V5 compressor seal replacement

My 1996 S10's V5 compressor seems to have a bad seal behind the clutch. I evacuated it and added one can of R134a and it was trying to work. (did not add any more R134 until i was sure it was not leaking)
But when i shut it off, i could hear the constant hiss in the area of the compressor clutch long after the motor was off. I had dye in the system, but could not see behind the compressor clutch.
What special tools do i need to do this? I know there are two groups of them. One set to take off the clutch and put it back on, and another set to remove the seal and put it back on. I don't need a $250 tool set to do this once. Autozone might have the clutch tools in there loaner program, but i don't think they have the seal tools. Any suggestions to do this economically? Since the compressor is still pumping, i hate to replace it when all it probably needs is a front seal?
From what i see on line, these compressors are prone to leak. Any tips? Will any other cars V5 sub to a S10? From what i can tell, the early ones used o rings on the back and will not directly sub.
Bob
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<snip>
My advice: Replace the compressor. If the system never completely emptied of refrigerant you could probably get away with changing JUST the compressor rather than the compressor and the receiver/dryer.
Chris
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Now days the accepted practice is to replace the compressor rather than try to reseal the shaft. Replacing the shaft seal is a tricky job that often requires multiple attempts. Now, if you worked in an A/C compressor reconditioning factory and your job was to replace the seal on every compressor that came through, you would probably become very efficient at it and would have a very low failure rate, but if this is the first seal you ever replaced the chances of you getting it right the first time are rather slim. Having the correct tool is essential and developing the correct technique is something that usually takes practice.. Who knows though, you just might get lucky the first time and save yourself some money. It's your call, but at least now you have been cautioned . BTW, I doubt that you will easily find a source for the specific seal replacement tool because it is customarily sold as part of a universal set, most of which are rather pricey. You could try OTC, Snap On, or RobinAir sites to search for the correct tools to service the compressor, just to name a few.
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Kevin Mouton
Automotive Technology Instructor
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Kevin wrote:

Well, a little searching found a V5 tool seal set for $23.99
http://user388353.wx15.registeredsite.com/miva/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=E&Product_Code "-190&Category_Code=MVP-acTKit
I would still need a snap ring tool (i have) and the clutch tool (which i think is on the autozone tool loan program).
Is it a crap shoot? You Bet. But i know the pump works And a replacement pump is hundreds of dollars. I also have seen many post about people buying replacement rebuilt pumps only to have them leak too.
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wrote:

A lot of times these seals fail because the compressor wears. You are sealing in a high pressure gas here so every little bit counts... As the bearings wear and allow just the tinniest bit of wobble of the compressor shaft the seal will fail. You can replace it but the new one will fail again in short order.
Steve B.
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I'd put the system under vacuum and see if the vacuum holds, before I jumped to any conclusions. The compresssor has a high-pressure relief valve which may be the 'hiss' you hear.
Dave S(Texas)
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