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Do a search to look for what is being hauled over long distances on trains today, mostly raw materials that are not needed quickly, vehicles and CONTAINERS both of which are then loaded on trucks for final delivery.
Materials that are needed quickly, or on time, are all shipped by long distance trucks.
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http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/management/2010-03-25-buffett23_CV_N.htm
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"Bjorn" wrote:
In many American cities there is no subway, maybe even no bus transport. Warren Buffet says that railroads are best-positioned to haul the raw materials and finished goods for a nation and economy that are bound to grow. Unlike trucks, trains don't have to compete on congested highways. Railroads are the only mode of freight transportation that can handle growth. We have no kind of national mass transit system as the European countries do. _________________________________________________________________________________
Mass human rail transit is a step backward in evolution. People no longer all live within walking distance of a transit station. They were freed by the invention of the automobile to visit, tour, or reside further from the tracks, and in any direction.
Freight rail transit is best used for hauling heavy bulk raw materials to and from sites with storage at a railroad spur. It is not practical to load all commercial freight onto trucks at manufacturers, take it to be reloaded onto trains, then taken form the trains and reloaded onto trucks for final delivery. Time, energy and money are saved by taking railroads out of the loop.
National security is another reason for keeping trucking capability. Rail cars and trucks can be thought of as transports with serial versus random access. They each have their uses but when enemy bombs fall, serial access is quickly killed. Trucks can drive around bomb craters.
Don't let socialist zealots force us onto bicycles and into railroad cars.
Rodan.
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Trains are making a comeback in many ways.
They have luxury for personal travel.
They have speed and comfort.
There are innovations of combining the trains which allow you to bring you car along.
There are combinations with rented vehicles at stops.
In cargo the innovations that allow containers to be transported easily of and on.
So the trains do definitely have a bright future and compete well with other means of transport.
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So the trains do definitely have a bright future and compete well with other means of transport.
******* It should be that way, maybe, but it is unlikely to happen in the USA.
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It is already happening
http://trains4america.wordpress.com / http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2009/03/18/ride-of-the-future-high-speed-trains-in-america / http://www.scientificamerican.com/report.cfm?id=future-of-trains http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-speed_rail_in_the_United_States http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/4282330
Obama is going in for more and better trains
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wrote in message news:16462e5c-653b-4cdc-

**** If you say so.... I have no great expectations.
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There is currently a high speed passenger train running from Boston the Washington DC. Like ALL long distance passenger trains, running in the US, it is loosing money and sucking on the public teat.
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http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2009/03/18/ride-of-the-future-high-speed-trains-in-america /
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At least it is for guys like you who work at McDonalds ;)
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The Volt and the EV1 is not the same thing.
Only thing they have in common is that they both have batteries and are over priced, over hyped and one is already over and the other one may well be over soon.
Volt is not an electrical vehicle so who cares anyway.
If the Volt will be made into an electrical vehicle it might be interesting but it is pretty surely priced way beyond any reason.
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Agree w/Mike on this.
I need three vehicles. I light-weight round-town 60-80 mile electric. About $ 15,000 in 2010 dollars.
And, a comfortable, over the road machine that gets good fuel mileage.
And, a performance car -- something that I won't care about gas-mileage wise. (will be driven 3-4K miles per year.
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That is most likely the case for many Americans. If gas mileage was paramount, we would be buying the midget and small cars that are available for every manufacturer. The fact is Americans prefer the larger safer, more usable, mid-size cars. GM, Ford, Chrysler, Toyota, Honda, as well as the European and the Koreans best selling cars are their mid-size cars, not their midget and small cars.
The best selling vehicles in the US are not cars, in any event, they are pickup trucks. The best selling single brand vehicle in the US and the world is the Ford F150, it has been for over 33 years.
I currently drive a 2009 Mustang GT convertible and a 2010 Lincoln MKZ, that I use when I need seating for more than four people. I don't care about the price of fuel, but the Mustang easily averages 23 and the MKZ 26.
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