We already knew that turn signal DRL's were a bad idea...

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On Nov 2, 2:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Brent P) wrote:


Seems to be common everywhere, there's a lot of Torx on my '93 F150 as well.
nate
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Interesting, outside the hotwire sensor (security torx, which I have not had need to touch, but did notice) and the seatbelt bolts I haven't encountered any on my mustang.
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Brent P wrote:

Just thought of something I didn't think of before...
were this my own car, an acceptable "fix" might be to simply break apart the amber lens and shake/vacuum it out of the housing. then use a 3157NA bulb in place of the regular 3157. Wouldn't fix the discoloration of the reflector or the hazing of the polycarbonate, but at least the lens could be polished, and the discoloration just looks bad. The right fix would be, of course, to disable the DRLs completely, but I have no idea how difficult that is on that particular car. I'd bet losing the amber lens would also help the assembly run cooler, even with the DRLs.
nate
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Or a 5702KA, if you don't want to be replacing 3157NAs every month or two. This works if the amber lens is only for colour and doesn't contain any optics.
DS
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I like Torx. It doesn't strip (Phillips, hex) or slip out (Phillips + slotted) or round off (hex bolt). And the drivers, being slightly tapered, work in some hex screws which have been partially stripped or were just badly made to begin with.
Security Torx, though, is just silly. I have a set of drivers for them, it's not like they are restricted items. It just makes the lawyers happy because it keeps the average Joe Moron out of whatever dangerous thing is behind the panel, and lets them blame the better-than-average Moron when he opens the panel anyway.
5-sided Torx is an abomination too. I don't have any of those yet. What's the point, except to get people to buy more tools?
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wrote:

Camcar's patents?
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Yeah, which comes down to getting people to buy more tools. I think they claim it is more secure because authorized dealers are only supposed to sell to authorized persons and whatnot. Which doesn't mean I can't find them on Amazon.
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Big snip....
Square drive is all the rage now in appliances. First glance it looks like a Phillips and a Phillips might work but if it's tight no way. Robertson drive seems to come to mind as the official name. More tools, better hang on to my Whitworth stuff in case it comes back......LOL
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Robertson is correct. It's been extremely common in Canada for many years on wood screws, drywall screws, machine screws, and sheetmetal screws. Works better than Philips, much better than slotted, and the colour-coded drivers make tool selection easy on the fly.
DS
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Repairman wrote:

Yup, Robertson it is... for years and years the only place I'd seen it was on a camper shell that my grandfather had bought back in the early 70's for the '73 Chevy pickup that my dad now owns... I think the tool we had was actually an old Phillips screwdriver field-modified on a bench grinder, only time it ever got used was when we mounted the camper shell and had to tighten up the trim (was aluminum over wood frame.) Seen it more and more lately though.
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The amber

Were the bulbs the correct size? I found a bubbled lense in a Tbird and found that some genius had put a similar appearing bulb into it, but the wattage was far higher. Dont know if this is even possible in this application.
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HLS wrote:

According to Sylvania's web site, yes - 3157LL (looks like a 1157 but with a plastic wedge base instead of the usual dual contact bayonet base.)
nate
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Probably because Sylvania don't supply the correct bulb, which is 4114K (much longer life and slightly cooler running than 3157LL).
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Daniel J. Stern wrote:

Apparently GM did not either, the 3157LL was in there previously. Unless it'd already been replaced.
nate
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Well, GM have certainly done stupid things before. Let's see if this is one of them. Here are some major (bright) filament life ratings for various S8 wedge-base bulbs physically, electrically, and photometrically compatible with one another:
3157LL (3157K): 2k hr @ 12.8v, 1k hr @ 13.5v, 624 hr @ 14.0v
4157K (4157LL): 4k hr @ 12.8v, 2k hr @ 13.5v, 1.2k hr @ 14.0v
4114K (4114LL): 12.8k hr @ 12.8v, 6.4k hr @ 13.5v, 4k hr @ 14.0v
Which looks like the smart choice for DRL service? Which looks like the dumb choice?
DS
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Stern wrote:

That data is not relevant to GM decision makers. How much does each bulb cost from various suppliers and what does the decision maker get from choosing a particular vendor?
If a rep for a Chinese company that can supply 3157LL's for a tenth of a penny less each than any other vendor on any of the bulbs plus throws in some superbowl tickets, that's the "smart" choice given the priorities.
The buyer has to replace the burned out bulbs so it is not something GM has to worry about. (Plus, all the buyers who know better stopped buying GM cars two decades ago)
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On Nov 6, 4:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Brent P) wrote:

Maybe *new* GM cars.
I'd still like to find something similar to my dad's '67 Cutlass. Back in the day, GM knew how to bolt a car together. I still would rather have, say, a '67 Barracuda... but hey, guess what, both Olds and Plymouth are now history... sad.
Does anyone subscribe to Hemming's Muscle Machines? This month's issue featured a '67 Dart GT... I immediately snapped back about 10 years. I was living in Pittsburgh and trying to find various pieces parts to keep my '67 Dart on the road, found a junkyard in McKee's Rocks that still kept all the "old stuff." Got to know the owner, turns out he was a CMU alum, so we'd chat for a bit every time I or one of my friends needed something. Found a '67 Dart GT in the 'yard, identical in every way to the car in this month's HMM except this one was dark metallic green. Gorgeous car, and didn't really show any reason why it should be in the junkyard. Only thing I could see wrong with it was the driver's door had a padlock hasp screwed into it (?!?!?!?!?!) I'd talked to the owner about possibly buying it off him as a resto project, and he tried to talk me out of it, saying that I'd be stuck with a salvage title if I went through with it. Well one day the decision was made for me when someone bought the transmission out of the car, and they removed it by flipping the car on its side with a forklift and torching out the rear mount.
I know that when you run a junkyard, you can't get sentimental about your stock, but a little part of me still is sad about that. I felt like that guy in that TV commercial that's sobbing as he picks up the old Camaro and drops it on the pile...
(yeah, I know I'm getting a little OT here...)
nate
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Last 30 years give or take 5.

That was 40 years ago ;)

Salvage titles can be cleared by going to a state that doesn't keep track of such things. As much as you've moved it would have had a regular title by now ;)
I've seen a fair number of cars in junkyards that really didn't seem like they belonged there.... then watch them get cut up, stripped, and generally abused.
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Brent P wrote:

I meant some of us still buy cars "gently pre-owned." My "new" car turns 20 next year. Should I bake it a cake?

I came by it honestly, it was at least 14 years old or so when it went to the Big Parking Lot in the Sky due to frame rust over the rear axle.

Now you tell me :( Actually I knew that, but it would have been a better long-term investment than the 914 that is still sitting in my parents' barn.
I suppose if I'd held onto it but never registered it that I could probably have gotten a clear title from Broadway by now, not that I would ever suggest that anyone do something slightly dishonest. (for the record, I've used Broadway exactly twice, once for a '62 Stude that was never registered, ever - seriously - and once for my '55, which had been floating around unregistered for a decade or more. So my conscience is clear.)

True, but it's rare that you see something truly collectible in that state. And when you do, it's really, really sad.
nate
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My 'new' car turns 11 in a month and half.


Probably the most collectable car I've seen like that was one of these:
http://www.myclassics.homestead.com/70SkylarkConvHome.jpg
http://www.buickbombsight.org/72akins.jpg
Early 70s skylark convertible... looked like it was a fairly solid and clean car. By the time I saw it, it had been stripped to the bone. A red one, factory red (I know for sure because there was no interior left at all, just nice red painted sheet metal), at that.
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