What GM's come without spyware?

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Ray wrote:


I don't know what manual you have, but they made it crystal clear in mine.
On page 7-9 of my Chevy Cavalier's owner manual:
Vehicle Data Collection and Event Data Records --------------------------------------------------
Your vehicle, like other modern motor vehicles, has a number of sophisticated computer systems that monitor and control several aspects of the vehicle’s performance. Your vehicle uses on-board vehicle computers to monitor emission control components to optimize fuel economy, to monitor conditions for airbag deployment and, if so equipped, to provide anti-lock braking and to help the driver control the vehicle in difficult driving situations. Some information may be stored during regular operations to facilitate repair of detected malfunctions; other information is stored only in a crash or near crash event by computer systems commonly called event data recorders (EDR).
In a crash or near crash event, computer systems, such as the Airbag Sensing and Diagnostic Module (SDM) in your vehicle may record information about the condition of the vehicle and how it was operated, such as engine speed, brake applications, throttle position, vehicle speed, seat belt usage, airbag readiness, airbag performance data, and the severity of a collision. This information has been used to improve vehicle crash performance and may be used to improve crash performance of future vehicles and driving safety.
Unlike the data recorders on many airplanes, these on-board systems do not record sounds, such as conversation of vehicle occupants. To read this information, special equipment is needed and access to the vehicle or the SDM is required. GM will not access information about a crash event or share it with others other than • with the consent of the vehicle owner or, if the vehicle is leased, with the consent of the lessee, • in response to an official request of police or similar government office, • as part of GM’s defense of litigation through the discovery process, or • as required by law. In addition, once GM collects or receives data, GM may • use the data for GM research needs, • make it available for research where appropriate confidentiality is to be maintained and need is shown, or • share summary data which is not tied to a specific vehicle with non-GM organizations for research purposes.
Others, such as law enforcement, may have access to the special equipment that can read the information if they have access to the vehicle or SDM. If your vehicle is equipped with OnStar, please check the OnStar subscription service agreement or manual for information on its operations and data collection.
-----------------------------------------------------
> Now I have to worry

This seems to be a "hazard" on just about any car that has airbags. On the other hand, I look at it this way: if I'm driving responsibly (like I just about always do) and the person I have a collision with isn't, then more likely than not the SDM will be in my corner, and I will WANT that data to be used to defend my case. Otherwise, it's my word against his or hers.
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Isaiah Beard wrote:

2001 Firebird. Page 1-26: Your vehicle is equipped with a crash sensing and diagnostic module, which records information about the air bag system. The module records information about the readiness of the system, when the system commands air bag inflation and driver's safety belt usage at deployment. The module also records speed, engine rpm, brake and throttle data.
No mention of "and if you crash, the cops and your insurance company will seize it to try and determine the cause of the accident."
I have a clean record, I'm just uncomfortable with having an electronic nanny onboard recording everything incase I might crash. How long until it's standard for your insurance company and cops to seize them from every accident?
Ray
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That isn't the concern as much as the accurate of the data being stored and used for a conviction. The average speedometer is 3-5% off but there are wide variations among that. "Theoretically" if one wheel was spinning on ice and the other on pavement a 30 MPH accident could be recorded as 70MPH, or a skidding locked up an 80 MPH accident could be recorded as 0 MPH for the person spinning into your car.
Or if perhaps you've got a defective speed sensor (not that GM ever has defective parts installed) incorrect data could be entered into the computer. I know that I don't know what my ABS data is as it's travelling down the road.
Perhaps I'm not as trusting of the government as most, just trying to figure out what new cars would be a secure purchase for me. Thanks for the info guys
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Of course the data needs to be interpreted, same with any other forensic evidence.
I don't think it's likely that any major speed measurement error in the case of a collision would go unnoticed, since the SDM also calculates the collision delta-V based on the accelerometer readings, which is independent of the normal vehicle speed indication.
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