Whats the difference between federal and California Emissions on a 2000 Chev. Astro

I have a broker/buyer searching auctions for a 2000 Astro for us here on the west coast. The biggest auctions (most selection) are in California and as a result most of these vehicals have code YF5 (CA
emissions).
Not living in CA I am hung up on not wanting a vehical with CA emissions equipment (poorer gas mileage, more difficult/complex problem troubleshooting, etc.)
What is everyones opinion? Is this no big deal and should I just not worry about it?
Does anyone know what the differences are (if any) between a YF3 and a YF5 code Astro after about 1998.
Hoping someone has some info...it could greatly expand our search choices.
Thanks
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It used to be that the actual CA emissions standards were stricter, but on a late model vehicle like that, there are most likely no equipment differences, because I believe the emissions certification standards are currently the same. The differences are mainly on the regulatory side, I believe, in terms of manufacturer certification of the vehicle.
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Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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Robert Hancock wrote:

Correct. In 99% of the cases, it's just a sticker. Yet, you can't bring a non california sticker car into the state. It's a scam, IMO, because it means 80% of the cars in the U.S. can't be bought if you are in California.
All in all, a California compliant car is therefore worth more - especially if it is rust-free, since it can be sold anywhere.
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You can, if it is used enough. See:
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/brochures/howto/nonresident.htm
In at least some cases, the manufacturer's warranty on emissions control related parts is different in California versus non-California vehicles (in some cases, that may be the only difference). The owner's manual warranty section should describe any warranty differences if they exist.
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There are two federal emission standards, one is known as the 'California' standard and is somewhat stricter than the other. The 'California' standard is required for all new vehicles delivered in New York state and all of the New England states as well as California. Testing within the states is something else again, not all states require annual emission testing. Some, like Pennsylvania, only require those vehicles registered in particular metropolitan areas to be tested annually.
mike hunt
Robert Hancock wrote:

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On Wed, 19 Nov 2003 19:16:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

NY is the same as PA, only certain areas require emissions testing. All areas require safety inspections...

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And my wife wonder why I drink! LOL
mike hunt
Mike Levy wrote:

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What's wrong with cleaner air?

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Nothing... but what do emissions laws have to do with cleaner air anymore? NOTHING. It's all a big Bureaucracy.
Can you explain to me why my truck can pass a sniffer test with flying colors, yet a visual inspection will cause it to fail, just because it has no cat? If it's within spec for emissions, then it's not polluting too much. Why should it matter what equiptment it has or doesn't have on it?
It shouldn't, but to the EPA bureaucrats it does.
Tony
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Compared to the original emissions standards for the vehicle when it was new, a sniffer test is generally a joke, even the newer dynamometer tests. The federal emissions standards cover a wider variety of conditions, including such things as cold-start emissions which a sniffer test doesn't measure at all. Therefore, because a vehicle passes a sniffer test doesn't mean it's anywhere close to the vehicle's original emissions level.
If the vehicle could pass the EPA emissions certification tests without a piece of equipment on it, it would NOT be on there, unless the manufacturer was trying to advertise the vehicle as being low-emissions..
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Robert is 100% correct.
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