wheel bearing adjustment

Hello Folks. 1981 Pontiac Parisienne, 305, RWD 85,000 KM.( YES, original) After installing new rotors, pads + front wheel bearings I drove for 300 miles on highway trip.
Noticed some play in front end - more prone to wind buffeting. On return I inspected wheel bearings. Left side was a little loose - I hand tightened ~ 1/4 flat on nut more whilst turning wheel. Left side grease was markedly different colour than right side- - black on left, original yellow on right. When I originally opened from a sealed package new outer wheel bearing prior to installing on left side, it was a little bit stiff to turn by hand due to excess lubricant / oil factory installed for storage. I packed it with grease prior to installation but didn't remove factory lubrication.
?? What would cause different colour of grease in each side? Does overheating result from slightly loose bearing + discolour grease?
?? If I decide to replace outer left bearing can it be removed without taking off caliper + removing rotor? i.e. What's a good way of coaxing outer bearing out with rotor in place?
Please reply to NG. Thanks, -JS
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Question Authority wrote:

I am guessing if your new bearing came factory prelubed that the grease may have been dark in color and that you may not have a problem, other than that now you have two different types of grease in that bearing.
Here is what I would do: remove the bearing - it just comes right out - scoop out any loose grease with your fingertip. Wash the bearing in a small can of gasoline until it has no grease at all in it. Let it dry thoroughly and inspect it - any pits? scoring? Blue color? if all answers are no repack with the grease you used for all the others and reinstall, drive happy.
If yes to any, you will have to remove the rotor to drive out the bearing race. It is not recommended to mix bearings and races; I've seen it done with no ill effects but it's not that hard to remove the rotor, just remove the caliper, hang it out of the way, and slide the rotor off. Drive the inner bearing out through the rear of the rotor with a brass drift, that will pop the inner seal off without damage and you will likely be able to reuse it. Now you can drive the inner race out and replace it.
BTW I have a cheap plastic bearing packer that works with a grease gun, it is a huge timesaver for jobs like this. I keep my grease gun loaded with Mobil 1 chassis grease, that is good for both wheel bearings and tie rods so I only need one gun. Doesn't hurt that my rear axle (Studebaker Dana 44) has threaded holes for a Zerk fitting so you can touch up the grease for the wheel bearings without any disassembly - gotta love old, user-friendly cars.
good luck,
nate
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Hello Nate. The new bearing didn't come prelubed, it was coated in an unusually heavy amount of oil / grease that was put on in factory before sealing package. Had lots more oil on it than the other , outer bearing from same manufacturer used on other wheel. I regret not cleaning the NEW bearing prior to installation. I didn't think that was necessary. Same grease was used on both wheels : yellow Quaker State NLGI #2 Wheel bearing was SKF BR3 Made in Mexico I didn't install races ( cones ? ) that came with new bearings, but used the ones that came with the new rotors. The new rotors didn't have the inner channels, grooves inside the hub to aid in removing races. In the past I have installed new races in new rotors / hubs but not this time.
What's a good way of coaxing outer bearing out of hub without removing caliper + hub ? In case the outer bearing needs replacing. Thanks, -JS

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Once you remove the nut, you can normally wobble the rotor enough to cause the bearing to back out of the race.
BUT, I agree with Nate.. it is risky business and not recommended to replace the bearing and not the race. The new bearing is made for the race that was supplied with it.
Last, I have seen bearings come with a greasy coating which I have always assumed is to prevent surface rusting. I have always thought it should be washed out, dried, and then repacked with a dedicated bearing grease. I may be wrong.
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