When Boosting another Vehicle is this correct.

I had problems starting my car in minus 26 degree weather. The person I asked to give me a boost has a year 2002 Nissan and he stated that his booklet states Not to boost other vehicles
Nor other vehicles give him a boost. He stated that his vehicle has a chip that costs thousands of dollars and boosting can damage the chip. We went ahead any way, his engine was off and my engine was off I connected the jumper cable negative (black) to his battery negative, then the black jumper cable to my battery negative. Then I connected the red cable to the battery positives of both vehicles. Made sure the connections were solid. Then the Nissan started its engine, it continued to run and then I tried to start my engine. I could not start my engine and after 5 minutes of trying stopped. I went and purchased some fluid to spray down the throat of my carb and the Nissan again assisted me. I still could not get my vehicle started and we stopped.
What interests me there was no damage to the Nissan and is this claim about not boosting other vehicles the manufacturer protecting themselves as usual. Or do they actually mean if you connect the positive of one battery to the negative battery of the other or if you cause an arc it will damage the chip (ic). Are they implying a Nissan battery will never give you trouble and you will Never need a boost in ninus 30 weather Or do you have to have your vehicle towed to a Nissan dealer.
Your replies appreciated Denny
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I am lead to believe that the best way to boost a vehicle is for the vehicle with the good battery to be turned off with the headlights on. The headlights add a load to the system which will absorb the sag in voltage of the battery and protect the computer systems from a voltage spike or sag. It is easy to blow a computer board with a voltage spike so this is how I have always done it and it works fine. Running the engine on the good vehicle while boosting is exposing its systems to unnecessary risk. Steve

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the negative of the dead-batt car to chassis (ground it) and not to he Neg output - you are putting it parallel to the good batt and a good chance that you MAY kill that chip. Hooking ip (+) to (+) and (-) to (-) is wrong and bad.
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because I haven't done that a hundred times on newer vehicles... didn't damage any of them.
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Well, if you put them + to + and - to - and always use your own car to do the jump, your batt is gonna need replace - gonna run low on juice lol. Well, just make sure you have a good set of cables and try to match up the batt sizes :) I once saw some guy using a Honda Civi to jump start a Ford Windstar - the Winstar sucked the juices out of the Civi cause they decide to leave the cables on to "charge" the Windstar before cranking it. I drive a GMC Safari, so I ended up jumping the two of them LOL
--- take a quick read in your car's owner manual, they will show you how to properly jump start your car. *note. on some newer car's like the Chevy Venture, they put the "Negative" terminal in a super uneasy spot to reach on purpose so that owner's wont beable to help jump start other cars unless they REALLY know what they are doing - cause if not, they might damage something. Hence why again, the (-) of the bad car should go to a metal connection on the car, not the (-) - you end up putting the two batts in parallel, rather than series. Here is a quick goggle - http://www.carbuyingtips.com/jumpstart.htm - give it a read
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jabs wrote:

The negative side of the battery is connected to car ground. It does not make any difference if the (-) cable is put on the battery or part of the car. It is the same thing. The reason it is not wise to attach the cable directly to the battery is because there may hydrogen gas there. It may explode.
You want the batteries parallel. It would be difficult and dangerous to put them in series.
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I had to jump start my Grand Prix and I was using a Silverado to give me the boost. Had the negative cable hooked up to the battery (Gramps did it) and my car wouldn't start. Moved the negative cable to an unpainted part of my chassis, turned the key and it churned right up.
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@hotmail.com says...

Sounds like it either wasnt making contact at the bat post or it had a bad ground wire.
I guess if this thread tought me anything it is that Nissan doesnt want their cars jumped and I'll gladly oblidge them in that endeavor. ;-)
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"Bonneville" wrote:

LOL! Me too. GW
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Sounds like it either wasnt making contact at the bat post or it had a bad ground wire.
I'm probably going to check the wire when it gets a little bit warmer out (gotta love Milwaukee weather...one day its 60 the next it's 15). But then it may also have not been making contact. All I can remember is that it was freaking cold out and my alternator plug wasn't pushed into the alternator all the way.
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Phillip Schmid wrote:

Better ohm/volt out the cable. It is not grounded properly. It will lead to early alternator death along with a host of other electrical problems.
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Better ohm/volt out the cable. It is not grounded properly. It will lead to early alternator death along with a host of other electrical problems.
I'll check into the cable thing when it warms up a little bit. It happened just after I replaced the alternator too (first one @ 90k miles). Just curious, but could a loose connection at the alternator have done that?
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Phillip Schmid wrote:

A loose connection at the alt should not prevent jump starting with cables at the battery posts but it could shorten alt life due to resistance and transients.
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color=#000000 size=2>...</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>&gt; jabs wrote:<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; &gt; Hence why again, the (-) of the bad car should go to a metal connection on<BR>&gt; &gt; the car, not the (-) - you end up putting the two batts in parallel, rather<BR>&gt; &gt; than series.<BR>&gt; &gt; Here is a quick goggle - </FONT><A href="http://www.carbuyingtips.com/jumpstart.htm "><FONT color=#000000 size=2>http://www.carbuyingtips.com/jumpstart.htm </FONT></A><FONT color=#000000 size=2> - give<BR>&gt; &gt; it a read<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; The negative side of the battery is connected to car ground.<BR>&gt; It does not make any difference if the (-) cable is put on the battery<BR>&gt; or part of the car.&nbsp; It is the same thing.<BR>&gt; The reason it is not wise to attach the cable directly to the battery<BR>&gt; is because there may hydrogen gas there.&nbsp; It may explode.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; You want the batteries parallel.&nbsp; It would be difficult and dangerous<BR>&gt; to put them in series.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>Oops, my bad - you are right, the other way around - hah hah. :P Silly me, series means it will be a total of 24V when they are "good" LOL - not good for the rest of the electronics!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>The important thing, just get it right - and yes, not to wise to hook up to neg batt cause it may explode, I think that link give a description of that. </FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML> ------=
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When jump starting another vehicle you should shut the running engine off before connecting anything. Then connect both positive ends to the positive terminals of the batteries. Then connect the negative leads to a steel bracket on the engine of both vehicles, usually there are lifting brackets or an engine locating strut bracket. Note that I said; engine locating strut "BRACKET", not the strut itself as the strut is mounted in rubber.
When both ends are connected, start the running car and make sure you have good connections. You should be able to hear the alternator load up trying to charge the dead battery. Let the battery charge for a bit, as long as possible before trying to start the other car. If you turn the lights on it will just put more load on the already maxed out alternator. After the car is started, disconnect the negative lead on one of the vehicles first, then the negative on the other vehicle, then both positive. In that order of disconnect, you will run less risk of causing an arc, which could damage either vehicle. Never cause an arc anywhere near one of the batteries, they can explode. This has worked well for me for years and never caused any damage to either vehicle. Good luck

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"Denny B" wrote

There are enough stupid people out there that aren't careful how they hook up the leads and end up frying some valuable components. This is what the manufacturers are trying to prevent.
There is nothing wrong with just hooking up booster cables to the two batteries (correctly) even with the engine of the donor car running. I've been working on cars for 23 years, and have yet to have had any problems by boosting this way. The recommendation to put the negative cable away from the actual battery post is simply a precaution in case the battery is leaking acid and the spark ignites the battery and blows it up. If at all possible it's better to install the negative booster cable to a ground on the engine, but I've done it both ways.
Just the other day, I was talking to one of the service advisors about a customer who had just towed in their fairly new Blazer. Seems the wife and daughter had attempted to boost the vehicle, got the positive and negative crossed....and the vehicle almost went up in smoke. Who knows what they blew on that vehicle.....will be interesting to find out how many components they fried. But that's the main concern, crossing positive and negative. Boosting new cars is done all the time. I'm not dragging a car in the shop if I can just roll a booster pack out to it.
Ian
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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 17:12:41 GMT, "shiden_kai"

And every one of them is behind the wheel here in Southern Calif when it's raining. Except for me. I'm stupid, just not that stupid.

My prediction is: The sacrificial devices now installed by the factory are arrayed like a regiment of pikemen, lancers and bowmen. I don't forsee any factory component other than what was supposed to open up at the reversal will be affected.( Aftermarket things that they hang on and hook directly to the battery with a long wire run can sometimes fizzle.) That's not how I would expect the factory to do things, as I'd expect them to leave one component supply unprotected just to sell a part to a dummy. Let me know if I was right or just passing gas.

I concur. I think what the folks are trying to prevent here is damage due to voltage spiking during the establishment of the connection. But capacitors can be a sponge for those, especially big ones, and a car battery is almost a perfect capacitor, and a huge one at that. The component that's a bugger for killer spike generating is the cycling AC compressor clutch, and the AC compressor is included even in the defrost selection, so it's a well used component. The various points of the electrical system are already hardened for that stuff, with the first device being the diode across the compressor clutch supply and earth at the connector. Many of the sealed electronic components are internally protected, just in case some yahoo scratches his head wondering who the hell put a resistor on this here icebox? (true event)
Jack

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