WOW! I hadda got 35 MPG !

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Yet another illiterate who can't read figurative language or even commas.
Phillip, a man of the age of ignorance.
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It has to do with downshifting. You didn't believe that the car would apply gas to keep it at the same speed, all I've shown is that it does. Now, if you're coasting why would you want to keep it at the same speed? Wait, I don't want to hear it. It'll be as irrational as the other answers you've had.

Yet you should realize those were quotes. When writing dialog or even simple one sentence lines (much like those that were there) you always go onto the next line without any commas or semi-colons. I don't believe what you said before was figurative. I show how much you "know" and you come back with an insult.
I think "a man from the age of ignorance" would make more sense. That first "of" could mean that I come before the age of ignorance. It could also mean that I'm not a part of that age. We're in the age of ignorance, and you reign supreme.
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I used tranny gear down in my 92 Lumina and i guaranted when you hit low there is considerable slowdown from the engine drag (and it has TCC that releases on coast). Roy

down
doesn't
BTW...most
see
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Neo wrote:

Matched only by your repeated (apparently) lack of knowledge on the subjects we are talking about.
>> What is your point?....if the engine stalls, in either neutral, or

Well, you think wrong. "If" we talking about an engine that has stalled, then no, the automatics in this day and age will not turn the engine. If you are talking about "engine braking", then yes, to a very small degree, the automatic will "turn" the engine, though it's really more correct to think of the engine retarding the movement of the vehicle when going down an incline. Very few automatics these days provide any noticeable amount of engine braking if you are in top gear. If you pull it into a lower gear, then yes, you get some engine braking.

You are losing me here....obviously, we must be talking past one another.

See above.
Ian
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Some? Come on, try down shifting to 1st gear when coming to a light!
The fact that in top gear there's barely any engine braking is because top gears have a long ratio, but that's the same in manuals: barely any engine braking at 5th or 6th gears.
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With a standard shift/manual shift transmission you will get engine braking in top gear assuming you have enough speed & RPM. If your engine is at say 1,500 RPM in top gear, you will not get much. If your turning 3,000 RPM in top gear you will get some.
Automatics unlike standards/manuals have a controller. They will not engage first gear above certain speeds. Such as 80 MPH. It may try for a second then the pressure will be so high it will only engage one or two gears down, when pressure drops enough to engage first it will do so. Even old 1969 TH350's are like that.
With a standard/manual you can go in to any gear you can engage. Your only protection is gear speed. I have seen that over come before. My younger brother did it when learning how to drive standard shift. Went from 4th to first, in my 1986 Chevette 5-Speed. He almost killed the engine. Thankfully we were only going 33 MPH. Yes the car did have the 4.11 Posi Rear End, Yes they put those is Chevettes.
Ian said you will not get much or any engine braking in modern automatics in top gear. That is at normal driving speeds (under 85 MPH). This is because there is not enough RPM for that gear ratio to slow the engine.
Now if your in top gear at just off idle, and you drop to first gear, you will get violent engine braking. The transmission will nuke it's self before it will over rev the engine. To really do this on a regular basis, you need to know at what speeds you can safely go down to the next gear. Else wise you risk burning out the transmission. Charles
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Older transmissions would probably self destruct gearing down at too high a speed, but they could also engage and overrev the engine ( can you say valve/piston interference/ collision?). This would cause the engine to destruct. Roy

is
a
two
Your
from
Posi
gear,
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So I guess you're just a two-faced hypocrite...
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Kent Finnell wrote:

Why? Automatics don't have rear pumps anymore.
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Why would it need one if the engine is running? The front pump is still going is it not?
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SBlackfoot wrote:

That is true but the coupling is very weak. Take your foot off the gas with an auto and the engine goes to low rev even though the car is still at speed. No engine braking.
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wrote in message

Depends on the speed. If the TCC is still applied, it's got as much engine braking as a manual tranny.
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Neo wrote:

That would be true. I don't think the TCC would still be applied with closed throttle though. I don't know for certain.
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wrote in message

It does in my cars...
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Neo wrote:

That is interesting. The GM, Ford, and Chrysler products that I have driven all drop to idle when I take my foot off the gas at highway speed.
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wrote in message

Well, both my Intrigue and my Bonneville remain at 1700RPM at 60MPH, whether they're coasting or cruising (same tranny and final ratio).
But as I said before, it depends on the speed. Typically, below 40MPH the TCC is not applied, then RPM falls quite a bit, but still well above idle (~ 1200 to 1500RPM).
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he TCC releases whenever the accelerator is released if all is functioning well. Roy

gas
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lol, engine braking in a manual... My 5 spd 2002 Blazer, does not THINK about slowing down for several seconds after letting up. The GM (Helminc) service manual verifies this is normal. It's for emmissions reasons. GW
Neo wrote:

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That's scary!
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OK OK OK !!
i'LL TRY NOT TO PUT INTO NEUTRAL ANYMORE... IT WAS BECOMING A HABIT, BECAUSE MY IDLE IS A LITTLE MORE than i want it to be.
i don't like the feeling of it trying to pull ahead a little, so i was putting it into neutral.
REMember,
the 95 buick century has the "free wheeling" rear axle............you know what that is??
It coasts and coasts.........ha!, the pre-owner didnt like it, he went back to dealer and said i dont want that on my car! ha..I'm used to it now, it might use the brakes a little more..but its only money, and pads, or rotors or shoes...........
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