2000 hinda civic will not start after rain

my car will not start after it rains overnight, when it warms up (when the weather) . it starts right away. what can i do. i have a new battery, new starter. any help will be appreciated. Thanks

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On Mon, 4 Oct 2010 21:13:50 -0700 (PDT), john sunday

If it turns over and not starting when it is wet it is caused by bad plug wires and probably a bad distributer cap. I can almost guarantee it.
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On 10/5/2010 8:12 AM, Clete wrote:

I second this - try replacing plug wires with a new set and make sure they're well seated.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/maintenance/1272351
a
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wrote:

I would agree if the OP said this happened after driving in the rain as the engine area gets wet from splashing. But every car I've owned the engine area stayed dry when sitting there, even if raining.
Unless you are saying the increased humidity of nearby puddled water was enough to make the plugs and wires act wet.
I'd be looking more towards a more sensitive component than the plug wires and/or cap.
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On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 11:10:23 -0400, "Seth"

this one. I would bet if he sprayed his wires in the dark the light show would be like 4th of July fireworks.
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wrote:

you could get enough of a temperature change from a rainstorm to cause condensation under the hood on plug wires or dist.cap.,particularly when combined with the higher humidity.
If the HV is leaking away,it's not going to ignite the cylinder charges.
causes for no start; no crank no fuel/too much fuel no spark/spark not getting to plugs(going elsewhere)
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Jim Yanik
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On 10/05/2010 08:10 AM, Seth wrote:

just general humidity can be a severe problem on ignition systems if maintenance is not performed properly. this is because sweaty hands leave salt residues. salt is both a conductor and hygroscopic. this can easily create either full or partial conduction paths to earth for the spark current.
ignition systems should always be worked on with gloves. all sensitive components like plugs and distributor caps, especially rotor arms, should be carefully be wiped clean with a clean lint-free cloth prior to assembly.
on a side note, never clean spark plugs with a wire brush - it leaves metal residue on insulators which has much the same effect of creating a conduction path at high voltages.
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wrote:

dirt and grease films can also conduct HV.

Good point! ceramic is much harder and more abrasive than the metal of the wire brush bristles. it's like wiping a lead wheel weight across concrete;it's gonna leave a track of metal.
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