2001 odyssey check engine light only on highway

Hello,
This has happened the past couple of trips between Washington D.C. and Cleveland, Ohio. While driving on the the PA Turnpike about 3 hours
into the trip the Check Engine Light and the TCS light come on. The TCS light goes off, but the Check Engine Light stays on. However, upon reaching our destination (either Cleveland or D.C.), the Check Engine light will go off after 3 local trips. One wrinkle, the last time this happened (last Saturday), the light came on about 15 minutes into the return trip on route 480 or 271(?) in Ohio going 55 mph. Anyone have any what might be happening, why the check engine light only comes on when traveling at highway speeds? Thanks.
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So the error is associated with constant throttle position and/or constant high RPM: A clue.

Get the error code(s) read. AutoZone will do it for free.
Without the error code(s), diagnosis is impossible.
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Went to Auto Zone today and the Error code is P0401 (text was EGR Flow Insufficent(?)). Interestingly, the Check Engine light came on today in city traffic.
Two days ago, I bought a new gas gap after talking with some people at work about the check engine light. My wife filled up the car yesterday, but she assures me she tightened the cap (5 clicks). Before going to Auto Zone, I tightened the cap as well (10 clicks or more). After leaving Auto Zone, (third trip after tightening the cap), the light went off.
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wrote:

EGR flow has nothing to do with a loose gas cap. That's a different code entirely and has to do with the EVAP system.
I think the light having gone off is concidental and it will come back on again, likely with the same code.
EGR insufficient flow suggests clogged EGR passages in the head or EGR valve, meaning they're carboned up and in need of cleaning. There is a Honda TSB on this: 00-009. I don't know if it applies to your year, but it's worth asking the dealer for a copy of it.
More reading: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3828/is_200402/ai_n9392519
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alldata.com (http://www.alldata.com/TSB/67/016705aE.html ) lists an emission recall for the V6-3.5L engine for the 2001 Odysseys. However, I have "heard" that it only covers certain VINs for the 2001, but I never received a recall notice. Would this fact give me "ammunition" with my dealer to get it repaired under warranty? Thanks.
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Ask your dealer. He will be more than happy to print it out for you. No charge.

Almost all TSBs do.
The point here is that a TSB is issued because these events have occurred: 1) The automaker discovers during production that there is a problem with something and cars have been shipped with the problem, and/or 2) a problem is discovered in the field, as dealers report back to Honda.
Once a problem is reported, it is fixed, and records are updated to indicate the start VIN and end VIN of the affected vehicles. Supplier records are accessed to flesh out this info. Automakers regularly quarantine vehicles in-plant that have been assembled with the problem, and apply the fixes before they are released for shipment.
If cars have escaped the assembly plant with the problem and made it to dealer lots, the dealers are made aware of the problem and issued fixes. These are the TSBs. These fixes range from manually bending metal bits to replacing entire transmissions.
Modern automaker records are precise to a degree few industries know, perhaps outside of the pharmaceutical industry. Franchised dealers may not be privy to all of what their franchisor knows, but the info IS there.

If your VIN is not included in the recall, then absolutely NO. You have no idea how exacting automaker records are. They KNOW if your car received thefaulty part(s).
Of course, the exception is the brand-new vehicle in its first month or so of production, which is when the first in-the-field problems begin cropping up.
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I got a copy of the TSB and it appears that my car's VIN is covered by the TSBs (00-009, 05-026), although Honda never sent me anything informing me of the problem. The TSBs indicate that Honda EGR is covered 8/80,000 but my car now has 82,000 on it, however the problems started to occur around 79,000.
What do you think the outcome will be if I ask my Honda dealer to fix the problem for free? Thanks for any responses.
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If it's really "your" dealer, as in you service your car there, or at least bought it there, pretty good chance they'll do for free or cheap. Otherwise, crapshoot, whattayagottoloose?
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Took it in and they "fixed" it under warranty. Unfortunately two problems occurred. First they appeared to use the wrong part. The part they used was for the 99-00 odysseys (06175-P8F-A01) not for the 2001 odyssey (06175-P8F-A71). Unfortunately I don't know if the parts are interchangable or not.
The second problem is that after driving it for less than 30 miles, the check engine light came on again. This time the code was p0420, Catalyst Deterioration. While I can't prove it, I figure that during the EGR repair, the tech cleaned the carbon right into the exhaust system thus fouling the Catalyst Sensor.
This repair would cost me $800.00 parts plus labor. The dealer claims the two events are not related and therefore I would have to pay for the replacement catalytic converter. The service rep would not even discuss doing the catalytic repair under the 8/80000 warranty.
I've had problems with this dealer before. An airbag recall repair on a 2004 accord turned into a broken seat adjuster.
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I had almost exactly the same situation on a 2000 Odyssey. The local Honda dealer spoke to the Honda rep and they did it at no charge at just about 82K. The local dealer is great, even though I did not buy the van there. I simply pointed out that the 80K limit is arbitrary and that the fact that I use good quality fuel, change the oil and filters regularly, and drive under no severe conditions may have extended the time before which THEIR defect in design created a problem. If the problem is with a lousy design, why should I be penalized for taking good care of the vehicle while someone who operates it more harshly, uses poor quality fuel, doesn't change filters, uses cheap oil, etc, get covered under warranty. If the EGR system was designed with inadequate porting, what made that design OK at 82K as opposed to 80K.
I also pointed out that we love the vehicle and would not think of going back to a Toyota product and have a new driver in the family and will be needing another car...
Getting an accomodation from a manufacturer often has a lot to do with how you present your case and the responsiveness of the dealer doing the service.
Leonard

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Your relationship with the dealer also has a lot to do with it.
The fact that I've used one dealership exclusively, and he gets ALL my Honda service (and knows it), has paid me back thousands of dollars over the years in things like this. Most recently was an idle air control valve, a $300 repair that I didn't pay for, a few months ago.
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wrote:

A relationship with the dealer can be very helpful in many service situations. It never hurts to ask anyway, however. In our case, we bought the van in another city because the dealer here had a long waiting list and they were in short supply. We never had any service to do on it so had never done any business with the dealer who provided the service. We will be sure to use them when the timing belt, etc needs to be done. The service manager simply had to ask Honda to cover it. They made less on the warranty repair than if we had paid for it, but did so as an investment in customer realtions. It will pay off in our case. Other dealers might not be so quick to trade service dollars for good will...depends on lots of factors...but if you don't ask and don't make a reasonable case, you'll never know.
Leonard
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Common problem with Odyssey of that vintage. Check forum at www.odyclub.com . More than likely EGR or Transmission. There are TSB's on both. Check with your dealer and have the code read. The codes and information is still there even if they go off. Honda has extended warranties on both depending on your mileage.........

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And I thought it was just me. I experienced the same problem on two separate 1000 mile trips to Orlando FL. And to answer your question it only occurred at highway speeds. Never identified the problem and it has not occurred again in over a year. Thanks for asking and hope we get resolution.

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(the amount it has to adjust what it expected to be injecting in order to satisfy the O2 sensor)? If so, it could be as simple as an air filter or fuel filter that needs to be changed or that was recently changed when it *really* needed it, or a fuel pressure regulator that changed a bit. Or it could be something else altogether :-}
"Check engine" lights remind me of that old lampoon, 'If Microsoft made cars there would be a "general car fault" light.' The best humor has an element of truth.
Mike
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Interesting that you stated fuel. The problem only occurred immediately after re-filling the fuel while on the 1000 mile journey.

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You need the code pulled to determine anything for sure. Anything else is pure speculation. Your van is a big computer and the computer monitors everything in it. AutoZone's will pull the code for you in most places. Some others will loan the tool for you to do it yourself. You could also buy one. I have seen some pure code readers for about $50. End result You need the code.

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That's because the ECU tests EGR flow on decel from 55mph.
If you never reach 55, chances are you'll never see that code.
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