2006 Honda Civic Hybrid

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I recently purchased a 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid and am very dissapointed in the fuel economy. I am only getting an average of 40~42 MPG vs the advertised 49~50. I was told by the dealer to let it break in and then the
milage will get better. I have over 900 miles on the car now with the same fuel economy. snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
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So give it time to break in and then see if you have something to complain about {;^)
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MPG can vary a lot depending on many factors. The EPA says: "the EPA rating is a useful tool for comparing vehicles when car buying, but it may not accurately predict the average MPG YOU will get."
http://www.fueleconomy.gov /
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You got ripped off!
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Welcome to the club. I have one that's two years old with 7000 miles on it. I got the same BS from the dealer about break in. When I had 700 miles they said wait until 5000, when I had 5000 they said " Just what mileage do you expect"? I told them I would be happy in the low 40s. After two years, I have never seen more than 34 in town.
On Tue, 21 Feb 2006 08:52:54 -0500, "Flyifyoucan"

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Driving it 3500 miles per year is not conducive to good milage in my experience. In fact, with such little use I would question the wisdom of buying any new car, much less a hybrid. At the rate you are driving, even if you were getting 40mpg instead of 30 mpg, you would only be saving about 30 gallons per year.

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For the longest time (25,000 miles), we averaged about 43 mpg combined (70% hwy, 30% city) with our "04 Civic hybrid. As of late (and mainly due to a change in driving techniques, I might add), we are averaging around 46 mpg. There is some truth to the "break-in" claim, but the best way to save fuel is through modifying your driving habits.
Check out this site for info on actual mileage results from other owners, as well as driving tips for maximizing fuel economy:
http://www.greenhybrid.com/compare/mileage /
Good luck!

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Thanks, Spaz_pop Great Site. I'll have to register my Accord, which is my second Honda Hybrid. I had a Civic CVT, but my wife didn't like the small car ride. Nor, since she was brought up with a 4-speed could she ever get over/use to the "slipping clutch" feel of the CVT.
On Wed, 22 Feb 2006 16:27:34 -0500, Spazpop2000

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We're batting around the idea of an IMA Accord as well; mileage isn't as great as it could be (if they offerd it as a 4-cyl vs. the 6-cyl), but it's also nice having the extra power and cabin space.
Did you buy an '05 or '06? I'm curious as to the reduction in EPA mileage estimates on the '06 vs. '05- it wouldn't seem that the extra 80-90 pounds that a spare and sunroof adds would decrease mileage by that much. There are claims that it is just matter of weight class; the extra poundage kicked it into another class, which reduced mileage figures.
I did take an '06 for a test drive on the perimeter around Athens, Ga.- got it up to 65, set the cruise control, and let it run for 15 miles. It averaged 38.6 mpg on the gently rolling terrain. Mieage was much worse in the stop/go traffic back to the dealership, though...

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I have outfitted my '05 with a spare at mucho $$$$. Currently getting the EPA 29 "in town" but that is not a lot of true stop and go. Pretty straight shot to work on a limited access at 55, but the humps are enough to drop it out of 3-cyl mode. I get over 37 mpg on interstates from your neighboring state to the west traveling to the neighbor in the east to see the grandkids.
Sunroof would have been nice... I think the calculation method for hybrids was or is changing to assure the same charge in the battery at the finish as at the start. (Not sure if it was a requirement in the past.)
I wish I still had the Civic, also, for around town, but the wife would not let go of having a (German) American car and trade hers in.
If I could only have one and it was my trip car - I take the Accord. The Hybrids are status not $$$ savings, anyway, for the next 5 years - no matter whose it is. Maybe then the cost penalty will lessen and the technology will improve.
TTFN
On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 17:30:40 -0500, Spazpop2000

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Well, I guess it's a moot point now; with the increase in MSRP on the '06, coupled with the limited supply (and thus the unwillingness of dealers to move on the price), the IMA Accord is just too pricey for us now. So, we'll keep the '04 IMA civic and enjoy our newest purchase...an '06 Audi A3.
So, I guess we have a couple of things in common; although my wife has the hybrid and I have the German car...
Later!
BH

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I have yet to find anyone who actually achieves the fuel economy with their hybrids that the "EPA" numbers suggest. Somehow or another the car companies, Honda included, are gaming the process.
The break-in argument is a smoke screen.
John
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Very few people have achieved the EPA numbers since they were developed three decades ago. That's why the disclaimers that the numbers are for comparison purposes only and that your mileage may vary.
That said, our 2002 Prius is usually within 10% of the estimates in decent weather; upper 40s to lower 50s around town and roughly the same on the freeway. Cold weather takes a toll, and today's freeway speeds no longer match the EPA test conditions.
Mike
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My 2003 Civic got an overall 40 to 41 (grand total during ownership) with High 30's in town and 44 to 45 on the interstates. If I stayed at 55 mph then I could get 48 on the highway. LIke Mike, within 10% if you always behaved.
On Fri, 31 Mar 2006 05:58:20 -0700, "Michael Pardee"

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John Horner wrote:

Not really John. The database at greenhybrid.com, tank by tank, and car by car, show folks getting considerably above the EPA estimates. I personally get 47.5 city and 51 highway, about spot on.
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Hi / I also just recntly purchased a honda civic hybrid 2006. great car, but I am not yet overly impressed my the mileage i get in town (note though that the twon is mexico city, and the high altitude (around 7000 ft) might have an influende. But perhaps jdsnipes could tell readers a secret or two how to hande the hybrid. Is it worth paying attention to not using the aircondition a lot?, does it make sense to try and keep the battery full? is i better use the breaks or the lower gear when driving downhill? how "soft: should one best accelerate ? I am sure that driving patterns matter, but which exactly are best suited to the hybrid? By the way, I never ever seem to have had the electric motor only move the car forward.., even when rolling at low speeds.. is there a trick to make this happen??
regards gr
rysa4 wrote:

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I added an old post below, also.
1) The current crop of Honda's never move on electric only. The engine must always be running.
2) As I explain below, I do get the rated mileage on the Accord but was between 5 and 10 % under epa on the Civic.
3) As you coast you will see it start charging (called regeneration or regen mode), then as soon as you touch the brake, you will see it increase the regen and with significant braking pressure the regeneration goes to maximum. So, in general, the care and feeding of the battery will take care of itself. Even when living in a mountain state where you MUST use the engine on long downhills and PUMP the brakes, remember BRAKE PADS ARE CHEAPER THAN ENGINES. The brakes are usually the better primary means for passenger autos.
If you know you are going to climb a long hill, then yes it is better to have a full battery to start, but there are limited, if any, things you can do that are worth doing. If you need the electric boost to have sufficient total horespower, then maybe going out of the way to charge the battery first has some merit, but very little. Once the battery is gone, hill climbing capability gets pretty poor in the Civics with CVT. Not a problem in the Accords.
Other than that here is what I think of the Accord:

wrote:
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Flyifyoucan wrote:

Wait until about 3-5000 miles.
Also, if you are in a winter climate, that will decrease your mileage too, particularly on the highway. As well, check your tire pressures and your driving habits.
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Most cars get 20 percent below epa ratings. Don't expect much improvement. That is why the EPA is going to change their tests soon.

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Art wrote:

My '93 Accord gets 15-20% above EPA ratings on the highway.
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