2010 Civic: Security and Spare Keys

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Hi;
I traded in my 20 year old Civic yesterday for a new 2010 Civic.
One of the advantages of the 20 year old Civic was that theft was not so much an issue. That was good as locking myself out of the car is
once or twice a year. I got around that by hiding a key in a magnetized case underneath the car. I don't feel so great about that option with a new car. I would to solicit polite suggestions for how I can plan for this situation. I have a roadside assistance plan, but I am looking to cut down on the cost and inconvenience of that.
Is it possible to get copies of the valet key made through normal channels?
Thanks much in advance for the info and polite suggestions
Steve
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If all we're talking about is for unlocking the doors, then you can have the metal copied pretty cheap. Even get it with a flat head (as opposed to the big plastic cover) so you can stuff it in your wallet.
If you want the key to start the car, then you're stuck with one of the expensive keys that can only be made by the dealer and locksmiths that have extra gear. Local hardware store would probably not be one of those.
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That actually sounds like good news because my problem is only locking myself out. If a cheap spare can't start the car it isn't much of a risk to hide the spare underneath the car.
Do hardware store copies NOT start the engine by design or is it a matter of their copying machines simply not being good enough? In other words, can I rely on the cheapo copy being bad enough to NOT be able to start the car?
Steve
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On 4/28/10 4:41 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@k17g2000pro.googlegroups.com, "steve"

key has no chip, so it will unlock the door mechanically, but won't answer the challenge from the car computer when you try to start the engine with it.
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It won't start the car cause it is missing the RF chip that's embedded in the head to signal the ECU that it's OK to start. No chip, the ECU assumes it's a hotwiring attempt and won't start.
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wrote:

Except that if a crook finds out about it, you've just given him free access to your car's interior and engine compartment.

It's a matter of the OEM key having a computer chip inside of it, and the hardware store key /not/ having one.

Not "bad", just missing a critical component. That critical component is part of your car's security system.
--
Tegger

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I eliminate that little problem by carrying two keys: the valet key is on my house-key ring, and the "chip" key with all the buttons is on a key fob, and that is also in my pocket. The latter key is the one used in the car's ignition switch. God forbid I should accidentally leave it in the ignition (or on the seat), and the doors lock with me on the outside... I still have a key in my pocket to open the door. I don't understand why this is so difficult for so many people.
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Howard Lester wrote:

Heh... Even on my ancient autos, I leave the ignition key under the seat and carry the door key on my key ring (which has about fifteen other keys on it as well).
Simplification of process is not an accepted practice by the mooing masses these days...
JT
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Don't blame the mooing masses. Blame the activists and the government workers they target.
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

Yeah, but it's the mooing masses that permit it to go on and on and on and...
JT
(U gits wot U voted fer)
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When unelected (and all-powerful) bureaucrats mandate immobilizers on all new cars, automakers would be suicidal to defy them.
--
Tegger

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On 05/05/2010 05:00 AM, Tegger wrote:

read: "insurance industry lobbyists"

well, it's not like consumers don't benefit. even if they get charged a few hundred for keys over the life of the vehicle - it's a good deal more convenient to not have the car stolen. unlocking the car while you're walking up to it as opposed to having to fumble for small holes in the dark is a good thing too.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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no,he's referring to the "car czar" and other unelected gov't orgs that are not under the purview of Congress. Lobbyists merely advance positions to CONGRESS,who either enacts them or rejects them.

having had my beloved Integra GS-R stolen,stripped and torched,despite my anti-theft mods and efforts,I like immobilizer keys. However,it should not cost $100 to get a new key made for your vehicle.
--
Jim Yanik
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Regulations are usually the purview of the bureaucrats, not Congress. So lobbyists may work on either the bureaucrats or Congress, depending.
Of course, that depends on how the original enabling bill was written...
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

...and those catch-22 thangs called executive orders...
JT
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On 05/05/2010 07:43 AM, Jim Yanik wrote:

wow, you're an unsuspecting innocent!

you failed to install the "rottweiler" and "glock45" security options.

--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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jim beam wrote:

I prefer the Glock 19 (9mm) solution...
JT
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Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

How about two Glock 18's, full auto 9mm, each with a 33 round magazine?

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pws wrote:

Sheeeeeeyit!
Too easy to empty your wallet in a hurry.
Then again, living in a border state...
JT
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No,Congress is -supposed- to have the intelligence and morals to act in the people's best interests. Instead,they go for the highest bidder. We really need term limits;NO careers in Congress. That's the only practical way to fix the problem.
BTW,many lobbyists used to BE members of Congress.

I had the second covered. "Gone in 60 seconds" is pretty accurate.

--
Jim Yanik
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