2010 CR-V tpms warning on dash

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To be fair, he didn't really answer it; so far, you don't know if the spare is covered by TPMS or not.
Your owner's manual will tell.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2011 05:45:23 -0500, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

Ok, I will re-read the manual and thanks Elmo. I plead ignorance to start but now I'm learning <grin>.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2011 05:45:23 -0500, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

Right.... just found it on pg 326... spare tire does NOT have the sensor.
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wrote:>>

Didn't think it would. I don't think ANY Honda/Acura models have a pressure-sensor in the spare.
--
Tegger

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When properly setting your tires so as to keep the light off, remember this: Each 10 degrees F of temperature change means about 1 psi pressure change. The tires MUST be at ambient temperature when you do the final pressure-setting. This means that you can no longer fill up your tires at the gas station and count on the light staying off the next morning. And especially you can't use the gas station's built-in gauge as a guide to inflation.
So, to keep the light off, and assuming you have no means at home for filling your tires...
Step one: OVERfill your tires at a gas station. If your door-jamb sticker calls for 26, put in 32 or 34.
Step 2: Drive home. Leave the car to sit overnight. In the morning, before you drive the car, and before the sun hits the tires, check the pressures with a decent gauge. Lower them to 26 (or whatever the door sticker says). **Take note of the ambient temperature during the time you performed this step!**
Why should you take notem of the ambient? Because... If ambient was 40, and it drops to 20, you /lose/ 2 psi. If it was originally 40 and it climbs to 60, you /gain/ 2 psi. If you set the pressures at the height of summer at 90 after a highway run, and you never touch them again, by the time winter comes and the temperature has dropped to 40, you've lost more than 5 psi (perhaps as much as 10 psi), and the light may come on. This means you need to check and adjust at least once each season, adding or bleeding as needed.
--
Tegger

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wrote:

Appreciate all the good info here. I do have a compressor at home so I have no excuses :( .
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"Doug" wrote in message
Anyone have success fixing this problematic sensor without going to the dealer? I read on some forum last nite how some had to go to the dealer multiple times to fix, change rims, etc... to eliminate the warning on the dash. Lately our weather is colder so I realize that may have triggered my warning on the dash but tires look okay. I don't know what the original pressure was nor what it is now. I may just ignor the warning on the dash since I'm confident about the tires but if I could do some quick fix, I'd be willing to give it a try.
Best to invest in a decent tire gauge and one of those electric tire pumps. Check your pressure (typically around 30-32) monthly.
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I wonder what makes him "confident" about his tires if he didn't bother to measure the actual tire pressure? you can be 10 PSI or more low before the tire shows any sign.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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wrote:

See my previous post which might explain why it caught me by surprise. No argument... I'll put a gage on it first and then put air in one or more tires. I've got a compressor so I admit I have no excuse for low tires.
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I've found most people don't notice low tire-pressure until the pressure has declined to about 15 psi or less, and the sidewall has a serious potbelly.
--
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wrote:

Sometimes I go by touch rather than by sight. If I touch my tires often when properly inflated, I get a sense by touch when they aren't as hard. I don't claim to be perfect but I feel confident about this.
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I'm afraid that method is nowhere near accurate enough for any useful purpose, not even on vehicles which lack TPMS.
There is no possible way even the most sensitive hand is going to be reliably able to tell the difference between 30 psi and 25 psi, or between 25 and 20. Use of a tire gauge is the ONLY correct way to set pressures.
--
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wrote:

I don't claim to be as good as a gage of course but I think my hand is decent. Normally what I've done over many years is first gage the tire to proper specs and after several times doing this and feeling it with my hand (and eyes) I then use my hand/eyes for in between gage checks. It works for me for shorter trips / time. Of course if I were going on a long trip, I'd use a gage.
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wrote:

Just to add to my post, normally when I do put air in my tires, I use a gage.
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On 12/12/2011 06:40 PM, Doug wrote:

while i agree that a gauge is the way to go, there is a method of checking tire pressure that is a good deal more accurate than what tegger seems to be scared about and which is useful "in the field".
if you flick your finger against the tire wall, you'll hear a ringing tone. admittedly, you're going to have a hard time if you're alongside a busy freeway, but it's there nevertheless. and its tone depends on air pressure, much like a guitar string tone depends on tension [the concept shouldn't be too hard to grasp since the tire wall has tensioned strings in it]. you can thus quickly learn the tone for your tires when properly inflated, and can use it to inflate to within a couple of pounds of target if you don't have a reliable gauge handy.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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Interesting Jim. Never heard or thought of that but why not. Makes sense to me. I think we all agree a gage is always best but one could survive on the road without one ... at least for a while. I'll have to try your method tho I admit my ears aren't as good as they once were :-( Thanks Jim.
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You could survive just fine without a gauge for probably /all/ the time, but the tire-pressure light is not likely to stay off for you.
There's a difference between "safe" or "acceptable" tire inflation, and inflation that will make the TPMS computer happy.
--
Tegger

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On 12/13/2011 10:46 AM, Tegger wrote:

that snippage makes no sense out of context. but because you're so childish about any poster that doesn't play the way you want them to, you're prepared to discard context for avoidance. ridiculous.

of course, if you'd not been playing childish snippage games, you'd have to address the fact that using the method i described, it's possible to manage without a gauge, AND not have pressure warning lights.

[sticks fingers in ears] "la la la la i can't hear you!"
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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If you want the light guaranteed to stay off, you're going to need a gauge all the time, plus the steps I outlined in an earlier reply.
--
Tegger

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wrote:

I understand. Thanks for the help.
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