45K "Suggested Maintenance" from my dealer

I have a 2003 Accord that was a lease car I bought at around 30K in mileage. So I know all maintenance was done, mileage was low, etc. My question is this:
Knowing that dealerships LOVE to have you come in for checkups and repairs, I just got my 45K checkup/maintenance reminder. What would this cover, and do I really need it? I plan on replacing the trans. fluid w/ my next oil change - always smart to do regularly, I'm told - but should I let them squeeze the (probably) extra $100-$200 out of me? I love the car - my first Honda - and do want to care for it. Knowing this, what maintenance SHOULD I really consider top-priority over the next x-number of miles? Thanks for your help here - maybe I'll split the $$ with my answerers!
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bechard

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Waiving the right to remain silent, bechard

The recommended maintenance is probably in the service section of your manual. Or, you can always call he dealer to see what they do and what they charge.
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That's probably only medium service-- change oil and filter. Everything else will just be checked--eg fluid levels, tire air pressure,
At the Honda dealership in my town--they only do major service at 30,000 60,000 90,000 120,000
My advice is to wait until you have driven 3000 to 4000 miles between oil changes. Take it to the dealer and tell them to check the records to see if anything else (other than oil and filter) needs to be done. Also when you have about 75,000 to 90,000 miles on the car tell them to change timing belt major tune up adjust valves change upper spark plug tube gaskets. change valve cover gasket
I plan to have it done at 75,000 miles but a Honda mechanic told me that it's usually okay to wait until it has about 90,000 miles. The choice is up to you.
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bechard wrote:

I would follow the severe service guide in the manual with the following extra precautions:
Flush brake lines once every two years, regardless of mileage. Many European cars have this as a standard maintenance item and I feel that it helps greatly extend the life of the master cylinder and calipers by clearing accumulated moisture from the system.
Change auto tranny fluid every 30,000 miles. Honda and just about every other company says it can go longer, but on modern vehicles it seems that expensive automatic transmission failures are much more common than are expensive engine failures. New tranny fluid every 2-3 years seems a very small price to pay for extra safety margin.
Finally, change out the engine coolant at the same interval as the tranny fluid. Make sure to use real Honda fluid, not some generic substitute.
Dealers often add really bogus stuff like "fuel injection treatment" which means throwing a can of solvent in the fuel tank. Watch out for that nonsense.
YMMV, John
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Ignore it.
Follow your owner's manual.
You don't need the brakes dusted out or the exhaust manifold lubricated.
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wrote:

Don't forget replacing/flushing the blinker fluid.
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Generally speaking, the only thing that will get serviced is your wallet.
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I have 2001 honda accord LX auto. It crossed 35000 miles. I thought it is about time to change the transmission fluid. I do not go to dealers. I went to the local Mr. Good Lube. He said transmission fluids are not required to be changed until around 60K. He also checked the fluid and said it fine.

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CV boots should be checked at every oil change. You can do it yourself or most dealers look for no charge or is included with change. Some say change brake fluid but would agree of previous poster that it can wait. Now for a lease vehicle I agree do not take anything for granted. Now I WOULD do the transmission at owners manual recommendation or as frequemtly as possible. I do not know how difficult yours is but if it a simple drain and fill with no filter (not the full flush converter and all) than I would have it done when on special or do it yourself. I never put much faith in tranny fluid changes BUT having fleet vehicles for 10 years and 60,000 miles a year, they change the fluid as often or more than the manual says. THE FLEET COMPANIES ARE CHEAP CHEAP CHEAP when it comes to spending money. They have them serviced every 5000 regardless and we get nailed if we skip some. AND YET THEY CHANGE THE TRANSMISSION FLUID!!!! usually every 30,000. This tells me something about the research they must have done to make sure the transmissions do not go out as they have to fix them.Vehicles are usually traded at 60-100k.
2 cents Thanks Tom

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Don't assume anything was done during a lease program.
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