Are the DIY AC recharge products worth the time and $$?

I'm asking because the AC in my '98 CRV doesn't perform like it used to so I bought one of those products last Saturday(with a gauge built into the unit)
only to find the refrigerant level to be well within the specs of being fully charged. Aren't there compromises when you're only adding refrigerant to the low side? I remember my Dad telling that the correct way is to let a qualified shop do the work since their equipment is able to deal with the high side as well.
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Have it towed to the dealership and have them fix the problem so that you will not have this problem again. It's my guess that there is a factory defect related to at least one or more of the injectors. Jason
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I have always recharged my own R-12 systems successfully - "by ear" (listening to the compressor cycling), by thermometer taped to the evaporator suction side, by high/low guages or by sight glass. I figured I could recharge an R-134a system by ear and guage, but I found out the experts were right and I was out of my league.
I recommend you take it to a pro, who will empty it and put the right weight of refrigerant in. You can do the DIY route like I did, but I can only be sure the charge will be wrong when you are done. Mine sure was.
Mike
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