Bought a used Honda for my daughter today with ABS problem--please help!!

Yesterday, I bought a 1992 Honda Civic EX for my daughter. I test drove the car and everything appeared fine. I also test drove several others. I talked to the previous owner and looked at previous repair
records on this vehicle. Any way, today I returned with my daughter to sign papers and pick up the car. I had the dealer change the oil, water pump and the timing belt as the car has 116,000 miles on it. I asked the dealer when signing papers if he had driven the car and if he felt the brakes needed anything done to them and he replied "no". Tonight after my daughter drove the car home, I took it for a test drive and noticed after driving a short distance the ABS light comes on and stays on. I checked on the internet about ABS problems and heard the "horror" stories about the expense to repair these. I feel that I have been somewhat ripped off by a used car dealer, but maybe I am overly concerned about the ABS problem. Please advise me as to what I should do??? My daughter already owes me big time for the car and the work I have had done on it. Thanks for any and all help. Dana
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On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 20:54:07 -0700, against all advice, something compelled snipped-for-privacy@huskeraccess.com, to say:

People have been stopping cars without ABS for a long time now. A talented driver can stop a car shorter without ABS than with.
I'd get an estimate, and if it is prohibitively expensive I'd ignore it, assuming the car stops at all.
--
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snipped-for-privacy@huskeraccess.com wrote:

Not sure where you are, but most areas now have Lemon Laws, which require the dealer to fix any such problems that show up within a certain amount of time. Go back to the dealer, show them the light, and tell them you want it fixed.
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On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 00:17:38 -0400, against all advice, something

Yeah.
Let's see.
2007 - 1992 = 15. Run off you your nearest Honda dealer and raise a ruckus over a fifteen year old used car that is indicating a fault. I'm sure the dealer will fall all over itself in fear of violating some lemon law.
--
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Steve Daniels wrote:

Hey, fuckface, she said she just bought it from a used car dealer. That's precisely what the lemon laws are there for...
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On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 01:09:37 -0400, against all advice, something

Lemon laws apply to new cars, not fifteen year old You Buy Here You Pay Here cars.
But please, let us know if your White Knight Riding To The Rescue tactics get you laid. I mean, after all, whatever works.
--
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On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 23:25:07 -0700

In NY, the lemon law certainly applies to used cars, and was a large part of the reason it was written...
Now, into the bozo bin where you belong...
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Joe

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Joe LaVigne wrote:

Laws vary by state, but Joe is certainly right about NY. As long as you paid at least $1500 for the car, you should have a 30 day warranty on the major components. If you don't live in NY, check with your state's Attorney General's Office.
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Joe LaVigne, wrote the following at or about 7/27/2007 2:46 AM:

I'll be damned. New York State DOES have a used car Lemon Law which reads, in pertinent part
"Under the law, a used car is one which satisfies all the following five conditions:
(1) It was purchased, leased or transferred after the earlier of (a) 18,000 miles of operation or (b) two years from the date of original delivery; and
(2) It was purchased or leased from a New York dealer; and
(3) It had a purchase price or lease value of at least $1,500; and
(4) It had been driven 100,000 miles or less at the time of purchase or lease; and
(5) It is primarily used for personal purposes."
Two questions and only one counts for anything in this discussion.
1) what makes you think he purchased the car in NY State?
2) He DID say that the car has 116,000 miles on the odometer so... it's automatically excluded from the lemon law under para 4 above
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On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 19:45:36 GMT

I did not know which state the car was bought in, which is why I said "some states". And while I did know the mileage, I didn't bother to research the letter of the NY law to know the cutoff mileage, which is why I recommended they check their local laws.
In my original response, all I did was offer an avenue for research. I made no claims as to the specifics of her case, as I didn't know enough specifics to give such advice.
--
Joe

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Joe LaVigne, wrote the following at or about 7/27/2007 12:09 AM:

Actually (at the risk of incurring your wrath) that's not correct, Joe. "Lemon Laws" typically are in place to hole the feet of the MANUFACTURER to the fire when your shiny NEW car spends more time in the shop than it does on the road or your garage. Even then, "Lemon Laws" take effect only after a set number of attempts by the manufacturer or his rep (dealer) have been made to repair the problem. That number of required attempts varies by state.
With a used car dealer his only recourse is to pursue any warranty which was offered or purchased. Seems unlikely that he could prove fraud in this case. The brakes work and apparently there was no indication of impending failure when the deal was struck - assuming the purchaser drove the used car, right? Problems with ABS MAY be intermittent but, then again, what notice do you have the FIRST time there's a problem? Right! The trouble light comes on. That trouble light is NOT something you can typically jerry-rig to remain off until you sell the car. So, once again, the warranty, if any, is his recourse. If he bought it "As-is" then, of course, he owns a car with a failing ABS system and it's his problem alone.
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On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 19:37:40 GMT

In NY, the Lemon Law clearly covers used cars. They were pursued by lobbyists in NY in an effort to keep used car dealers a bit more honest. As I originally stated, and another poster has stated since, your local laws may (and will) vary, but it is quite worth it to find out what those laws cover.
I have personally had a used car dealer correct such problems on my previous car (1997 Caravan) within a week of buying, as it was required by law.
--
Joe

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