carburetors that allow you to drive 1000+ miles to the gallon

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Sorry, the conspiracy theorists have hoodwinked you once again.
Simple physics says there is NO way you could ever achieve 1000mpg with ANY gasoline (or diesel, or propane, or...) technology as long as approximately 80% of the energy is lost to heat and friction.

You cannot "bury" a patent. Every patent ever granted is accessible to the public at the various Patent Offices in various countries. I've been through stacks and stacks of them for customer projects.

You should try to be a bit more skeptical. GM is LOSING money. don't you think they'd spring something like this on the market if they could?

Carburetors don't burn gas, engines do. Carburetors only mix gas with air and send it on its way down a long pipe. You need a certain minimum mixture of gas and air to have proper combustion, or any kind of combustion at all for that matter.
Carburetors are very inefficient compared to fuel injection, and for fundamental reasons it is impossible for them to meet current and future emissions and fuel economy regulations.
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TeGGeR

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I canna change the laws of physics, Cap'n! It isn't the carburetor or engine that allows higher fuel economy, but the design of the vehicle. A bicycle could probably get several hundred mpg, but a car as we know it has too much drag.
The by-the-ways show up in discussions of hybrid cars all the time. We have a 2002 Toyota Prius, and it does indeed get as much as 50 mpg or slightly more in town. But an amazing number of factors can eat into that. Short trips can knock the average economy below 40 mpg (there is a display for trip mpg, 5 minute interval mpg, and "immediate" mpg). The A/C or defroster has about the same effect. Last winter I rolled the windows down and turned the heater on high to see what effect it had, and the next five minute bar dropped from about 40 mpg to 25 mpg! The car gets 65 mpg at 60 mph (no A/C on) and 45 mpg at 75 mph. When the edge is that fine it takes very little to dull it.
Mike
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Fuel economy has improved from maybe 12 mpg to 25-35 mpg over the past 75 or so years. Don't you think it's ridiculous for the next jump in efficiency to be to 1000 mpg?
Assuming that a car *can* get 1000 mpg, what do you think that will do to its performance? Zero to 60 in five minutes.
I can understand why the oil industry would want to thwart fuel-efficient cars, but why the auto industry? Does not make sense.
Carburetors are not efficient, period. Fuel-injector cars do not have them at all. The best improvement that was ever made to a carburetor to increase its fuel efficiency was to eliminate it.
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mopa wrote:

A bunch of urban legend BS. Your time would be better spent studying the laws of thermodynamics instead of reading unsubstantianed crap.
John
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Even more interesting:
www.snopes.com
Pagan
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Specifically http://www.snopes.com/autos/business/carburetor.asp
It's also worth noting that US patents expire after 17 years (non-renewable, unlike copyrights), and patents are not binding outside the countries in which they are registered. Any such carburetor would be in the public domain by now, and we would have seen them being made various places overseas - even if they could not be imported while the patent was in effect.
Mike
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