Civic Hybrid Mileage

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We are considering the new Civic Hybrid and are interested in the the real-world mileage. The numbers seem pretty good, but are they realistic?
Any owners input would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
- Russ
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AFter 8,000 miles and 2 years, we get 34 winter, 31 summer in town, (air conditioner), 40 on the road. Extremely disappointed.
On Fri, 28 Jul 2006 22:32:44 -0700, Russell Lombardo

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Hybrids are hype and bluster and little substance.
My old '83 Civic is getting 35 in town and around 45 mpg on the highway... Low insurance, no payments and since it has faded paint, it ain't high on the "to steal" list.
Eventually, an electric will come along that will have a range of over 400 miles on a single one hour charge. When that happens, the gasoline powered cars will go into a steep decline...
JT
gerald musselman wrote:

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OTOH, our Toyota hybrid gets mid-40s around town with my lead-footed wife using the A/C heavily. It gets 45-55 on the highway, depending on the load and speed. If we got 30s around town I would start troubleshooting. Something would have to be very wrong to do that badly.
Look for better performance (both acceleration and economy) from hybrids in the future. The basic advantage, running the engine inefficiently less of the time, has a lot of room for improvement.
Mike
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What were you expecting?
What did Honda say the mileage would be?
Shoot, I get 24 in town and 28 on the highway in my 94 Lexus with 166K miles on the clock.
I don't get those that buy hybrids. I really don't.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Don't dispair. Give it some time. They will be where the pogo whips are.
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Thanks for the comments. We may just save some money and purchase a regular Civic. I think the mileage is mid-30s on that one.
Thanks again,
- Russ in Santa Barbara
On 07/29/2006 4:48 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@s13g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "Body Roll"

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Russell Lombardo wrote:

I'm looking at my son's fuel logs, for his '06 Civic Coupe EX Auto/trans. The car is averaging 21 to 23 in town (L.A.) and 31 highway (road trip all highway driving.) Those are "real world numbers." The car now has 2k miles on the clock.
F.E. is what it is.
Here's what Honda has to say about Fuel Economy:
Honda's Tech Line fields many questions on fuel economy, including why some vehicles don't get the fuel mileage estimates shown on the fuel economy label (part of the Monroney label that's on every new car and truck).
Question: Why can't I get the City and Highway mpg estimates shown on the label?
Answer: The mileage estimates on the label reflect the average mpg attained by similar vehicles in a model line under controlled laboratory conditions and are not the result of an actual road test. And remember, as stated on the fuel economy label: "Actual mileage will vary with options, driving conditions, driving habits, and vehicle's condition."
Question: Just how are the EPA mileage estimates made anyway?
Answer: Test vehicles are run by professional drivers on a treadmill-like device that easures exhaust emissions and fuel usage. During the test, the vehicle's headlights, A/C, heater, audio unit, and all accessories are turned off. Upshifts on M/T vehicles are typically made at 15 mph (1st to 2nd gear), 28 mph (2nd to 3rd gear), 41 mph (3rd to 4th gear), and 52 mph (4th to 5th gear). The City portion of the test simulates a 7.5 mile stop-and-go trip with an average speed of 20 mph. The trip takes 23 minutes, has 18 stops, and keeps the engine idling about 18 percent of the time to simulate rush hour traffic delays. The Highway portion of the test simulates a 10-mile drive with speeds averaging 48 mph. It's run from a hot start in a mix of rural and interstate driving conditions. There are no stops, and there's not much idling time. When both test results are known, the City mpg is lowered by 10 percent, and the Highway mpg is lowered by 22 percent; this makes the results closer to real worldls fuel consumption.
Question: How do I calculate mpg?
Answer: You divide the miles driven by the number of gallons of fuel that you used.
Question: How can I increase my vehicle's mpg?
Answer: To increase your vehicle's mpg, do this: . As often as possible, accelerate slowly and smoothly, keep your engine speed below 3,000 rpm, and lower your road speed. . Keep your tires inflated to the specs listed on the doorjamb sticker. . Keep your vehicle in top condition by following the maintainance schedule listed in your owner's manual and by using the recommended engine oil.
Question: Where can I get more info on fuel economy?
Answer: You can get a free copy of the Model Year 2001 Fuel Economy Guide by any of these means: Mail: National Alternative Fuels Hotline 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031-1207 Phone: 800-423-1363 Internet: www.fueleconomy.gov
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On Sun, 30 Jul 2006 14:50:30 GMT, TomP wrote:

Drove about 500 Miles (on the highway) this weekend, with an 06 Civic Siand averaged about 31MPG. I would have expected the EX Auto to do a little better with the smaller engine and all. Makes me feel better... ;-)
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You are certainly entitled to your opinion, and Honda's current offerings tend to support your view.
I have been excited about hybrids since I heard of the concept 2 decades ago. They are the solution to the most vexing engineering problem in conventional power trains: efficient throttling. After all, using 10 or 20 horsepower from a 200 hp engine on a continuing basis is a farce. My own prediction is that hybrids will be at least as pervasive in 20 years as fuel injection is now compared to the much simpler carburetion. The potential benefits of the change are vastly greater for hybridization than they were for electronic fuel injection. Honda's IMA theoretically has the capability, but the degree of hybridization the Civic uses is very small indeed. The Accord "hybrid" is more ridiculous.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

Obviously "your mileage may vary" applies here in more ways than one. I know people who've seen very little improvement in their fuel enconomy with hybrids vs. standard cars... I know of others who've seen SIGNIFICANT improvements. In the end, it will depend a lot of how you drive and what type of driving you do.
Let's not forget though, the other main benefit of hybrids is significantly lower emissions... which are important to some people who are concerned about being "green". And of course, are partially to blame for potentially inflated mileage figures, which in some jurisdictions are based on simply measuring the emissions produced.
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You mean like the Prius idiots I follow who are apparently so busy driving their video game and watching the fancy power screen that they don't realize that it's rush hour outside and they're impeding hordes of traffic as they drive very carefully to make the video game screen go all green?
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wrote:

You've been watching them do that when you should be watching the road? I assumed they were reading magazines like everybody else. ;-)
Traffic conditions and short trips are the big determinants of fuel economy with any car, and it really shows up with hybrids. 1 mile trips are a killer of fuel economy with anything on the market today except electric cars. Conventional cars drink gas with mild traffic congestion while the Prius (dunno about the HCH) thrives on it. The Prius suffers in heavy congestion; if you are averaging less than 20 mph you can expect the climate control to take a larger part of your fuel budget, whether heating or cooling.
Mike
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Our Accord hybrid gets about 27 mpg in my wife's mostly stop and a little go commute to work. Since they are not selling well you can get a healthy discount on one. Plus the tax rebate. On a 300M she used to get 20 mpg.

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Art wrote:

That is a pretty good improvement over the stock V-6 Accord. Ours gets around 20 mpg in that sort of driving.
Honda missed the boat on the hybrid Accord. They should have gone more maximum fuel economy by mating it with a small 4 cylinder engine instead of going for very high performance.
John
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wrote:

I think the real sad part is that now there is prejudice that a performance hybrid is a bad idea. I think a hybrid boost to a Civic Si could be a real improvement - a much better match than the V6.
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On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 05:19:12 GMT, Gordon McGrew wrote:

What V6?
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On Tue, 8 Aug 2006 03:37:42 -0400, Joe LaVigne

in the Accord
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On Wed, 09 Aug 2006 05:23:35 GMT, Gordon McGrew wrote:

Ahhh. I read your statement as the V6 in the Si which doesn't have one... ;-)
Really, I like the Si just as it is now. Hybrid doesn't really sound like the way to go. At least not yet.
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2006 02:08:43 -0400, Joe LaVigne

It isn't a no brainer, but here is my thinking. The high revving 4 is a great performer, but it could use a little help off the line. The electric motor is strongest at low rpm. the two complement each other. The high performance engine is not as thrifty as the mainstream Honda engines so the gain in mpg might produce greater savings in the Si than in the already efficient Civic and the fuel you save is premium. If you think of it as a performance enhancement that pays for itself, it could be attractive to the enthusiast buyer. It could have even been an Acura version, although Honda has indicated that they don't want to sell to sell Integra-class Acuras anymore. OK, fine
Personally, the Si is the first Honda car that makes me want to swap my '94 GS-R. Maybe in a couple years...
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