Do I really need new timing belt on '03 TL w/ only 23.8K miles??

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I have a 2003 Acura TL (purchased in November 2002) with 23,800 miles on it. The dealer is recommending I have the timing belt changed,because the manual says it should be done every 7 years
regardless of the mileage. It costs around $840 with their current $100 discount, and this includes the timing belt, water pump, drive belt, and I think up to 1 gallon of coolant.
NOTE: The dealer told me there is no way to inspect the condition of the belt because it is hidden.
Do I REALLY need to have this done on a car with only 23,800 miles on it (even though the manual does say it should be done every 7 years regardless of the mileage) or should I wait? If so, then when should I get it done? Let me know what you recommend.
Thanks,
Jay
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Correct.
Yes, you are past due. The timing belt does deteriorate over time hence why they give a mileage and time value, whichever comes first. If it will actually snap or not is a gamble. If it goes bad it could do a little damage to your engine, it could do a lot. Your call on if you want to take that risk.
As for the price, shop around. A good independent shop could come in at a much lower price. And yes, you do want to do the water pump at the same time.
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Thanks. Is there any correlation between the condition of the visible rubber belt(s) under the hood versus the timing belt. In other words, if the belt(s) that are visible look okay, then is it likely that the timing belt is still okay, or is there no correlation?
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Thanks. Is there any correlation between the condition of the visible rubber belt(s) under the hood versus the timing belt. In other words, if the belt(s) that are visible look okay, then is it likely that the timing belt is still okay, or is there no correlation? ------- Pretty informative.....
http://www.youngsgarage.uk.com/timing_belts_facts_and_myths.htm
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On 06/06/2012 03:50 PM, Stewart wrote:

you'd have to have a magnifier and some expert experience to have any chance of being able to tell. it's much safe to simply say "no" and replace on schedule.
but you can find a much cheaper price quote than the $840. and at that mileage, you do NOT need to replace the coolant pump or oil seals - what they always add on to the job list. replacement of these latter items may be appropriate for frod or gm, but on honda, it's much more destructive than constructive. don't do it unless you have actual leakage or bearing damage.

yup, that's pretty much it - you replace because it's safe and because most people can't typically tell signs of wear.
--
fact check required

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.
How is replacement of the water pump destructive?
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On 6/7/2012 1:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I imagine that what he meant there was that removing the old and installing the new one may result in some collateral damage accidentally. We all experienced that at times when we bothered to get our hands dirty.
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Well, that would be true for ANY auto-servicing, no?
I think if you're savvy enough to successfully install a timing belt -- which is NOT a beginner's job -- then the added complexity of a water pump shouldn't make much difference.
Me, I'd rather spend the extra $100 in order to know for sure I won't have to tear all the way back in again for the sake of a stupid coolant leak. The last pump I replaced felt like new. But what was it going to feel ike halfway to the next change? I didn't care to take the chance.
--
Tegger

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On 06/07/2012 04:11 PM, Tegger wrote:

except that it does because often times, people rushing to do stuff quickly screw stuff up. and worse, replace high quality oem parts with cheapo low quality aftermarket, and the thing doesn't last 30k miles.

that's because it's oem honda, and they're that good. and that's why if you look at the service manual maintenance schedule, the pump has an "I" next to it, not a "R".

--
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On 06/07/2012 01:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

as others have said, collateral damage. and i wasn't referring /just/ to the coolant pump, but to /any/ component replaced on a superstition/extra profit schedule rather than a knowledge schedule.
but you also have the matter of replacing something of very high initial quality and low mileage with inferior aftermarket. a friend of mine had a bunch of work done to his civic, at a dealer here in the bay area, and paid full dealer price, but they used aftermarket components. i wouldn't have believed it, but he showed me the invoices and the components clearly had aftermarket manufacturer names on them.
--
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wrote:

dingdingdingdingding
we have a winner
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

man, you are REALLY pulling shit out of thin air here, desperate to avoid having to maintain the car you bought.
How about looking at the tires? How about looking at the power steering fluid? Maybe you want to try to correlate the condition of your floor mats with the timing belt--"hey, look, floor mats are OK, therefore the TB is OK!"
You can solve this entire problem simply by leasing a new car every three years. No maintenance involved; problem solved.
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote in

No.
No correlation. You can't go by the appearance of the belt. The belt fails because the carcass weakens, not because the teeth become visibly worn.
The belt is a combination of rubber and fabric, with the fabric being the structural medium. But rubber ages. As it does so, it begins to delaminate from the rubber, which eventually causes the teeth to strip. You can't see this with the naked eye until after the event.
If the teeth should strip, you're looking at about a 50-50 chance of valve damage. That puts the cost of belt replacement at least double what it would have been. Are you a gamblin' man?
--
Tegger

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On 06/06/2012 05:57 PM, Tegger wrote:

actually tegger, the honda service manual does state an inspection procedure for timing belts. and it does specifically address tooth wear.

not left to its own devices it doesn't - not this rubber.

--
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On 6/6/2012 3:04 PM, Seth wrote:

Reading this thread prompted me to check the service manual of my '94 Accord if it specified any time limit for the timing belt but could not find any. It only specifies 90K mile intervals and even that is just recommended. So I don't understand why some models have a time limit besides the milage interval, others, like mine, don't.
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On 06/07/2012 12:40 AM, cameo wrote:

careful there dude - you'll lift the lid on the pandora's box of fud and obfuscation that is the gap between the facts known by the manufacturer and what's safe to tell technicians and owners.
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On 6/7/2012 3:40 AM, cameo wrote:

I think your car may be 60 months or 60,000 miles/100,000km
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On 6/7/2012 4:40 PM, Al wrote:

No, you've got that 6 upside down: the service manual is clear about this: it's every 90K miles, or 144K kms. But earlier I did miss the heading line with the time period and now I see that it has that down to 72 months. Shoot, in my current situation that comes sooner than the milage limit.
The older I get, the more things I miss. :-(
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On 6/7/2012 8:10 PM, cameo wrote:

what I saw was supposedly the Official 94-97 Accord Maintenance Schedule From the official Honda Shop Manual, Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Service Publication Office. It says 60/60. I found it at:
http://www.cd5tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?tG00
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On 6/7/2012 5:43 PM, Al wrote:

That's strange. I've never seen such frequent intervals before. If anything, I've seen less frequent ones than mine. The Service Manual I have is published here in the US, not in Japan and does not include figures for European models.
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