Does a car rust quicker, garaged

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The answer is definitly yes. Case in point. 1999 Isuzu Trooper, always garaged. 35,000 miles, four months over warranty, exhaust from cat back, warranty denied, $1200 for Isuzu parts on line. 51,000 miles,
fuel tank-fuel pump-sending unit, all rusted beyond repair. $1450 to repair at closest garage.No Isuzu dealers in sight, they dropped the line. Closest dealer offered to check the leak for $100 but assured me there would be no warranty as did Isuzu corporate.. I think no more Jap cars. Three new Maximas, one new Toyota, probably five other new cars but never a money pit like this.
Ron
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snipped-for-privacy@msn.com wrote:

This is VERY true. It is the heating, sweating and melting in a garge for engine heat that greatly increases rusting. My wifes 200 cherokee has never been garge kept and it does not have any rust on it or under it yet and we live in the salt belt too. I found out by accident about 30 years ago. WHen my parents moved to the country they did not have a garage for several years (out buildings but no close garage) and they left their cars out. Prior to moving there by dad's car would start showing rust after about 2 years from new when being garage kept but when kept out side it was still pretty much rust free after 5 years and 170K miles and it was not form improved factory protection either.
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wrote:

I've heard this before, but think it's over-rated. The water is hitting flat pieces of sheetmetal and bouncing off. Some gets into panel gaps. I don't see any real "forcing" of water into strange places any different from where rain-water would drip. Plus, those "hidden" places aren't what's going to rust first. What's going to rust first are areas where the paint has been damaged by rocks and sand.
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the wrap-around weld on the door and hatch edges (especially on fords), followed closely by the wheel arches where salt-laden crud and sand gets jammed against the inside of the steel, after sneaking past the fender liner. Certain AMCs and Chryslers from a few years ago had a big problem with the front fenders- there was an actual ledge in there where salt-laden sand would be packed against the inside of the top of the fender, and stay there till you cleaned it out by hand. With due respect to Japanese cars, which I own one of and basically love, I don't see many older ones around here that aren't totally bananna-spotted with rust. Guess they don't salt back home in Japan, so the engineers didn't spec coated steel or whatever. Now that many/most are made here in NA, maybe that has changed.
I'v had some luck, in years I wasn't too lazy, with saturating the door edges and under the hood with cheap spray wax mixed with hot water. Sorta like the shipping wax the manufacturers used to use. Gotta do this in the fall before the weather turns, however, and it is pretty easy to forget in the rush of real life.
But having said all that- I still get the cars bottom-washed whenever there is a thaw, if it lasts long enough for the lines to die down. And now that I have a garage (non-heated, but house leakage probably keeps it barely below freezing at worst), not scraping the glass in the mornings is worth the increased rust of the temp cycling to me. Neither of my current heaps is anywhere near collectible, and I drive the rusty one when the roads are white. I doubt it makes a significant difference- if sun comes out on a snowy day, greenhouse effect gets my car hot enough to melt off all the snow anyway. Very annoying to come out at 1700, and the doors are frozen from refrozen meltoff. (Also been too lazy to silicone the weatherstrip the last few years...)
aem sends...
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On Sun, 04 Dec 2005 18:00:16 GMT, "ameijers"

Well, your scenario #2 there is what I said.

Doesn't matter where they are made. AFAIK, starting in the early 90's all the major Japanese makers "got with the program" for corrosion protection. I know my '92 Prelude did quite well...
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Most use clean water for everything.
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"Most use clean water for everything. "
Is this true? I'm pretty sure the local one uses recycled water. And unless water was free or really cheap, I would think most would recycle at least the wash water?
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I work for an environmental company, and have done clean up at a few local washes cleaning out the traps.
All fresh.
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i agree, i've been there as well (in the south)
always been municipal water into a holding tank of some sort, that fed the pumps, some times with water softners to help soap and wax treatments do their jobs easier and of course prevent spotting etc.. the water drained to sewer, all the crud stuck in the PIT, when the PIT was full the crud stayed and the bays just flooded
definately would not want recylced water shooting on my car.
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I don't know but if you look at it long enough I think the process slows down considerably.
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On 6 Dec 2005 12:49:14 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Indeed. Cars do rust "quicker" if they're not maintained. Ie washed etc.
--
gburnore at DataBasix dot Com
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TP wrote:

Here in Montreal'surbs we get even more salt than you do...
CW says keep the car away from heated garages. There may be an electrical effect if the garage floor is bare concrete (which does conduct) and this might affect rusting. Might not.
I kept one Accord in an appartment garage many years ago and it did not have any effect that I could tell ... there was a little rust after 8 years. I did wash the car every couple weeks, however and that surely helped (though not underneath). I sometimes put my car in my garage in the winter, but I've blocked off the heat so the temp is usually just below freezing.
The best is an unheated garage. That keeps the snow off. If it's really cold, use a block heater for an hour before you use the car in the morning and it heats up pretty quick afterwards.
White cars seem to rust quickest. I believe it's because moisture behind the panels stays longer whereas darker colours heat up in the sun and evaporate the moisture quicker.
Cheers, Alan
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I live on Long Island, NY.
We use a nice mix of 30% salt and the rest sand.
Yeah our cars rust nicely and all turn white when we drive in the winter (hint, its not the snow that makes the cars white)
I have a 92 sentra that has always been garaged. What I found is that between the cars I own (altima and infiniti) the 92 sentra which was always garaged DOES show very little rust on it. The other cars are newer and do have more corrosion on the undercarage.
Just my 2 cents.
Tom
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The speed of corrosion is increased with temperature. The theory is you drive in salty roads and then when garaged the vehicle is subjected to above freezing temperatures and allows more corrosion. When salt spray tests are performed the temperatures are elevated to promote corrosion to speed up testing. I do not know if being garaged will in fact be worse but I guess it could. The fact is a warmer vehicle vs. a colder vehicle with the same corrosion environment will corrode faster where it can.
Tom

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