Door Locks & Defoggers ?

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Hi;
I have a 91 Civic and I will soon be shopping for a more modern used Civic or Corolla.
There are two things I don't like about my car that I am hoping to get
away in my new car.
The first is the way the drivers side front door locks. You have to pull the handle to put the locking button down. I'm guessing this was meant to help people to NOT lock their keys in their car, but it has never prevented me from doing that. In fact, it is almost a daily nuisance as a try to get out of my car and hold my bag in my hand at the same time.
Can this be avoided with a newer Honda?
My current car does not have air conditioning. The defogging mechanism sucks. When it is raining and chilly/humid my windshield and other windows still fog up significantly.
Will this not be the case with a car that also has air conditioning? Is there any way I can test defogging capabilities out while car shopping -- without having to wait for a rainy and humid day? :)
Thanks in advance for any info
Steve
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Most newer vehicles use remotes for keyless entry and no longer require you to pull out the handle to lock even when in the car (power locks). As well, with AC most will use the compressor when using the defroster/defogger. If not, if you can manually turn on the AC while using them it will clear up the windows much faster.
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In article

Yes.
But I had such a beast; it became, quite literally, an unconscious move. Methinks you're resisting it way too hard, if it's not automatic by now.

pssssst--A/C *is* the defogging mechanism. The entire purpose of A/C is to remove moisture from the air (most people think the purpose of A/C is to cool the air, but that is not the case). Without A/C, you can't remove moisture from the air. Hence, you don't have any sort of defogging mechanism.
You've been operating under a misconception.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Well, someone has, anyway. Your statement will come as something of a surprise to those living in hot, dry climates. The *actual* purpose of AC is hinted at by the very acronym: "Air Conditioning." It's supposed to both cool *and* dehumidify the air, in order to keep it in bearable "condition," temperature and humidity-wise. Not one, both. It's the cold evaporator coils that do the dehumidifying.
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wrote:

The *main* purpose is to remove moisture, to allow the body's own cooling mechanism to work.
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wrote:

IMO,the intent of AC is to provide cool air,and the removal of moisture is only a secondary effect of providing cool air.(IOW,I think you're wrong)
Remember that the hot interior of the car is not affected by moisture content.Thus the need for -cool air-,to pull out that heat.
That is what makes you comfortable.(and keeps you from sweating heavily)
--
Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

    The removal of humidity from the air is what causes the cooking effect.

    See above.
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Incorrect. Expansion of compressed gases is what causes the cooling effect. The removal of moisture is a side effect.
One can dehumidfy one's car without cooling it. I frequently have the compressor on during the winter to dry out the air, even though I'm also running the heater.

Says someone in Nova Scotia.
--

- dillon I am not invalid

"Gee, Jimmy,I'm sorry to hear that your girlfriend
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Dillon Pyron wrote:

while that effect exists, it's small beer compared to the real heat exchange mechanism - that of changing phase from liquid to gas. it's liquid /evaporation/ that causes the cooling effect.

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just like the example of 63 degree incredibly moist air proves it.
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wrote:

no,it doesn't. 63 deg "incredibly moist air" is not a "primary" reason for AC.
AC is primarily to remove -heat- from the interior,not moisture. The vast majority of AC usage is for HOT interiors.
People do not get into their hot cars and say "oh,it's too humid in here,turn on the AC",they think "it's too HOT,turn on the AC" to remove the heat,to get COOL AIR flowing on them,cooling them.
--
Jim Yanik
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But you said "cool air" is why you want A/C.
I say, cool it all you want--the human body will hate it that way.
And the windows won't defog, which was the problem the original poster had with his old car.

so you're saying that when it's cool, they simply don't use their A/C. Right? Because if it's cool, you don't need A/C.
People generally don't think about the body's cooling mechanism, usually out of ignorance.
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wrote:

YOU said auto AC's PRIMARY use was dehumidification.It's not. The PRIMARY purpose is to provide cool air,to remove heat from the interior.Auto AC is primarily used on HOT days.

Not on any hot day.

windows don't fog up on hot days,which is the -majority- of AC usage. Sure,a secondary use is defogging(with the addition of heat from the engine cooling system..),but not the -primary- use,as you claim.

Generally,they don't.Hardly at all,compared to hot day usage. In fact,auto owner manuals all emphasize that operators should run the AC pweriodically during cool weather to keep seals lubed. That shows that people generally do NOT use AC in cooler weather. Most people forget about AC in cooler weather.

Ah,a subtle insult.A sure sign of losing an argument.
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They are--they're getting warm moist air building up inside the car because the A/C isn't on, removing the moisture.
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ever think people may want to DEFROST their windows with the DEFROST control? (that actually just directs the -air flow- to the windshield instead of other vents.) Maybe they just want to direct some heat onto the window to clear it. Maybe they DONT WANT to run the AC unless they push the AC button.
you seem to think that one uncommon situation is the -primary- reason for AC,and it's NOT.
AC's PRIMARY purpose is to remove heat from the interior. That is what it's used for the most often.
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No, it's not.
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So you finally admit that the majority of users DON'T use AC -for- humidity removal,thus it cannot be the -primary- reason for AC. Thanks for proving my point.

You call them "ignorant";maybe they just don't like the AC coming on without them specifically turning it on. Who wants the AC coming on when it's cold outside and the windshield is FROSTY? In cold weather,the air is typically "dry";low humidity.No need to remove humidity.All you need then is heat.
You're too quick to use the term "ignorant".
Perhaps -most- autos do NOT turn the AC on for windshield defrost.

there you go again. ______
End replay.
You agreed with me,but now are back to your original nonsense that a seldom used situation is a "primary" reason for AC.
Perhaps you need to learn what "primary" means.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

    Apparently it is the class that many people should be in here. ;^)
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Cool air in and of itself is meaningless to the human body. The body's cooling mechanism depends on its ability to evaporate moisture--and if you have very damp air, if the dew point is low, then the moisture your body emits as a cooling mechanism has nowhere to go. If the moisture can't evaporate, the body can't shed heat nearly well enough.
Certainly you've had those days where the air is quite cool, but there's a bunch of moisture; it's quite uncomfortable, isn't it?
The point of A/C is to provide an environment where the body's evaporative cooling mechanism can work.

The cool temperature of the air is secondary to the fact that the moisture is removed. It's the removal of moisture, and that your body's evaporative cooling mechanism is allowed to work, that makes you comfortable.
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wrote:

So, driving through Death Valley at noon on a July day with the windows open to let in plenty of that dry air, we'd be cool and comfortable, correct?
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