Door Locks & Defoggers ?

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Cooler than with the windows closed, yes.
Of *course* cool air is part of the equation--but it's not the primary part.
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wrote:

but not comfortable. and not much cooler. sweating heavily in the 100plus -dry- desert heat still does not make a person comfortable. But the cool air of AC removes that heat and allows comfort.

Yes,it is. AC is primarily a HEAT transfer device. It's not specifically designed to remove humidity,but to remove HEAT.
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OK, fine. Consider this the next time it's a nice, cool, 63 degrees outside--and 100% relative humidity.
And ask yourself why the hell you are dying to turn on the A/C.
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Consider Death Valley;100 plus heat and DRY air. Yet you still need to remove the HEAT from your auto to be comfortable,rather than just use the fan to pull in dry outside air that's around 120 degF. To repeat,AC is a HEAT transfer device,and you have to remove the interior heat to be comfortable.

few people use their auto AC in such temps. such a use is SECONDARY to the primary purpose of -removing HEAT- from an auto interior.
I live in central FLORIDA,and I know all about humidity,and about hot cars.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

    "Few People" Man you need to get out more. Using the A/C in the winter months when there is snow and ice clears the windows of condensation so quickly.

     Removing the humidity is part of removing the heat from a vehicle or building.
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Brian Smith wrote:

technically, it's not. if you simply want to dehumidify, you don't bother pumping the heat outside.
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jim beam wrote:

    It's a lot better than just relying on a dehumidifier to remove moisture from a building. The heat that the dehumidifier generates while removing the moisture builds up rapidly. Better to vent the heat outside too.
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auto operators manuals all tell owners to use the AC periodically in winter months so it gets lubricated and doesn't rust up.If they have to tell owners that,then frequent use in winter is not common.
It used to be that most cars sold up North didn't have AC,unless ordered as an option.(and they were hard to sell down south without AC) Since foreign carmakers began bundling it as standard,that's changed,I believe. BTW,I grew up in Buffalo and lived in the North for many years.

a -secondary- part.Not the primary purpose of auto AC.

note there is a temperature control on every auto AC,but no humidity control.
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wrote:

wrong. ambient temperature DOES matter to the body. THAT is what makes one sweat,not how much humidity is present.

not as uncomfortable as a hot interior of a auto,at 100-140 degF or even more,despite how dry it might be.

wrong. the purpose of auto AC is to remove heat from the interior of the auto. moisture content doesn't matter in that respect.
the heat is what makes a person perspire. not the humidity. if the air temp inside is 110 degF,it doesn't matter to the human body if the humidity is only 10%.
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Both are somewhat true, though the temp is a bit more important, IMO.
If the humidity is high, when you sweat, it does not evaporate, and therefore does nothing to lower your body temp. That is why it seems more uncomfortable to be in Southern Florida at 100 F than in Arizona at the same temp. BUT, so long as the temp is 100 F, you're going to be hot, and no amount of de-humidifying is going to change that. And in a car, the temp will be even higher.
Therefore, you need cool air to reduce the temp, and some measure of de-humidification, especially in very humid climates, to help your body cool itself.
Also, the warmer air is, the higher a percentage of absolute humidity it can hold. 70 degree air simply holds less moisture than 100 degree air does. If you can lower the temp on the inside of the vehicle, it will be less humid by definition...
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wrote:

BTW,the air conditioning system is a HEAT transfer device; it works by moving -heat- from one area to another.
moisture removal is secondary,a side benefit.
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No, moisture removal--necessary for the body's evaporative cooling mechanism to work--is the primary goal.
To remove moisture, one uses the concept of condensation--which requires a cool surface to move the moist air over.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

sorry dude, it's the other way around. you can dry air without cooling it. you can't cool it without condensation. moisture removal is simply an artifact of cooling. thermodynamics.
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how?
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stuff that absorbs moisture;hygroscopic materials. like silica gel.
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so.....you have an air conditioner in your car and/or home that's full of hygroscopic materials?
My question to jim was, in the context of this conversation, how are you removing moisture without condensing it onto a cooler surface?
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

you could do it with pressure changes - moisture condensation is always a problem in paint shops and there's no significant temp change in air lines there - unlike a/c systems.
i appreciate that you think dehumidification is a great thing, and maybe it is a side-benefit of having a/c, but the objective of the equipment is not to simply dehumidify. if it were, it wouldn't go to the trouble and expense of venting waste heat to the outside of the vehicle, it would be used to re-heat the dehumidified air inside the car and thus save on componentry and energy.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Seriously? Ok. By *heating it*.
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wrote:

In the context of this conversation? Seriously?
But I thought you wanted COOL air.
And you don't remove moisture by heating. You change the dew point, but you don't remove moisture.
Condensation removes moisture.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

no, he's confused.

correct. but it's also correct that hotter air can hold more moisture. that doesn't make it "dry", but the proportion relative to saturation decreases.

correct.
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