Drive by wire (DBW)????

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Can you tell me what "Drive by Wire" is please, on new honda accord 2.2i-CTDi, thanks.
Haven't heard of that, cheers.
AE

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Control of something by electrical impulse over a wire rather tugging on a cable-- like in the old days there was one from your gas pedal to the butterfly in the carburetor that opened it wider when you stomped down. When you tromp on the gas pedal these days, it sends a signal to the fuel injector and fuel pump to step up the flow.
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actually,the ECU makes the injectors stay OPEN (duration) longer,thus more fuel flow.(by sensing throttle pedal position with a variable resistor)
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

not on its own it doesn't. throttle position is just one of many sensor inputs that the ecu uses to calculate injection duration. these also include:
oxygen sensor coolant temperature air temperature air pressure - manifold air pressure - atmosphere
throttle position is just part of the equation. if you want to check out how the math is done, read this: http://www.megamanual.com/v22manual/mfuel.htm
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Richard Blaine wrote:

In most cars, there is still a cable that attaches to the butterfly in the throttle body. Injector operation is controlled by the ECU based on the airflow measured through the throttle body or manifold, and assorted other sensors' input, rather than direct input from the pedal.
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Matt Ion wrote:

none of the above guys. drive by wire is simply having the throttle operated by a computer controlled servo. it means there is no mechanical connection to the pedal any more - just a sensor that acts as input for the ecu, and the ecu uses that in conjunction with a bunch of other info to calculate how wide to open the throttle. it's especially advantageous for automatics as it means you can de-throttle when the gear changes. injection really has nothing to do with it.
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No,"DRIVE by wire" is electrically controlled STEERING. You are describing "throttle by wire".
My 2003 Nissan Sentra SE-R SpecV has throttle by wire;the throttle plate is controlled completely by the ECU. Because of some wierd problem,my RPMs sometimes rev up to 1500-2000 RPM and hunt around there for a second,then slowly drop back to idle,without my foot even on the gas pedal.It's caused a CEL of "idle RPM too high".I either need a new PS pressure switch or new programming of the ECU(according to a service bulletin),which can of course only be done by Nissan dealers;....at some charge.
I might be able to get the reprograming done under a different safety recall at no cost.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

no such thing that i've ever seen on a civilian road vehicle. honda is simply mechanical power steering [just like any other car] but with electronic control on the degree of assist.

which is referred to, by honda and other manufacturers, as drive by wire.

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the steering is actuated by an electric motor that is controlled by a servo actuator loop at the wheel. They're trying to eliminate the power steering pump and reduce load on the engine.
IMO,not a good idea;if something glitches or fails,it WILL kill you. There's a reason FlyByWire F-16s got the nickname "Yard Dart".
On an F-16,F-15,F/A-18,you gain a lot of maneuverability,something important for fighter jets,but totally unnecessary for an auto.
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Actually, as I understand it, there is an electric pump to reduce the load on the engine, there is still a mechanical connection between the front wheels & steering wheel.....I could be wrong.

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Justbob30 wrote:

yes, electrically controlled power steering. that's not drive by wire.
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it would not be "drive by WIRE" then. for "drive by WIRE",the steering commands come through the wiring,not through any mechanical linkage.
And by top posting,you destroy any logical continuity of the thread.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Drive by wire means that the linkages in a system are not all mechanical. The system can be brakes, steering, throttle, etc.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drive_by_wire
Jeff

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Jim Yanik wrote:

I agree. In airplanes (that receive continuous maintenance) it's ok but not in cars many of which are driven by idiots or worse.
Give me a mechanical link to the function of steering, throttle and brakes anyday!
OTOH, the L1011 is a fly by wire plane with a perfect safety record.
JT
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From Honda's website... http://automobiles.honda.com/accord-sedan/features.aspx?Feature=drivebywire Drive-by-WireT Throttle SystemInstead of a mechanical linkage from the accelerator to the fuel-injection throttle, the Accord Sedan uses Drive-by-Wire technology. The system uses an electronic position sensor connected to the accelerator pedal that sends an electronic signal to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

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Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

still have one.

why? all a throttle does is control air. with a diesel, "throttle" doesn't even do that!

if you have hydraulic or air brakes, and most us have for at least 50 years, you have no direct mechanical linkage.

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jim beam wrote:

So, as usual you are cantakerous and take statements out of context.
Drive by wire means EXACTLY that. Kindly stick to the basics, OK?
JT
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Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

"drive by wire" is not "steer by wire".
kindly stick to "share what you know, learn what you don't", ok?
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jim beam wrote:

You all sound like a bunch of bickering women.
"Drive by wire" is a term usurped from "fly by wire" in the first place, used to refer to electronic steering control, throttle control, potentially braking control (haven't seen anyone using that yet, but it's only a matter of time), or any other electronic, non-mechanically-interfaced control of a car's "drive" systems.
The term is used differently by different manufacturers as to which system it's referring to, and indeed, probably refers to multiple systems in some (throttle AND steering together, for example). Since the meaning varies with the specific make of car, debating it here is completely meaningless... same as debating whether the proper term is ABS for Antilock Braking System, or ALB for Anti Lock Brakes, or any other acronym for that type of system, which varies from one manufacturer to the next.
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Matt Ion wrote:

Sez you... You wanna make somethin of it???
<G>

Actually, I'll accept your description since the application "...by wire" is somewhat generic with automobiles.
Anti lock brakes have been used in aircraft for a long time but again, airplanes are subject to specific mandatory maintenance regimens.
JT
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