GM U.S. July sales down 19.5 percent, Honda up 10.2%

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As you should well know, fleet use and private use are two different animals. Someone with a fleet car doesn't care about it as long as it is still functional and safe to drive. However, they would never put
up with the junky feel and increased NVH of worn components in their own personal cars. Thus a cheaply made car will cost a private owner much more over the long term than a well built one, unless the owner *acts* like a fleet manager and trades it in every couple years.
nate
Mike Hunter wrote:

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You have no idea what you are talking about. Fleet buyers do a far better job of maintaining their vehicles than the average owner. How may owners do you know that do things like changes brake fluid, do pressure tests monthly, take off door panels to lubricate window actuators, take apart and clean electrical connectors etc?
To a corporate fleet a vehicle is a 'tool' needed to run their business. Down time costs money. They generally keep them in service for five years or 300K WOF, because of federal deprecation tax laws. Many keep them even longer. To government fleets, maintenance is primary as well. To a police officer his patrol car is as important as his weapon, it has to work properly or it could cost him his life One state police department that we serviced, has Jeeps Cherokees from the eighties, with over 200k on the clock and still in tip top shape, in use in mountainous parts of the state.
The only high volume buyers that don't care about their cars are most of the rental car companies. Top fluids and get it back on the road. The difference is to a rental car company vehicles are NOT a tool, but their product that they get rid off in a year or less.
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:
(idiot top posting fixed)

I do that, and I try to remind those that I care about to do that as well. Not done on fleet vehicles IME.

Nobody does that, not even the fleet managers. I should know, having a fleet car. Well, I do, when I have to, on my own cars.

Not true; I turn in my car at 70K miles, I think the service trucks are kept a little longer but not much, maybe 100K or so.

That's the exception not the rule.

IME the fleet services treat the cars exactly like rental cars. When they are turned in at 70K miles they are just about smack wore out (well at least the Impalas the company that services the company that I work for uses are!) Before I got my company car, I drove my predecessor's car for a few days that was actually over the 70K cutoff. Aside from the ludicrously loud noises from under the hood, the shimmy, and the disconcerting creaks and clunks from the front end, it was just fine. I would find this totally unacceptable in a personal vehicle.
nate
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You must have missed the part of my post that said; 'an opinion based on your particular experience.' The facts, as I know them from serving thousands of corporate and government fleets in six states, are quite different. You are entitled to you own opinion, based on your personal experience with ONE vehicle in ONE fleet, but not your own facts pertaining to fleets in general ;)
mike hunt

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At least two; the last company I worked for had a similar vehicle program. Oddly enough we're talking about two of the very largest corporations in the entire world.
nate
Mike Hunter wrote:

--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
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Ford
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On Fri, 4 Aug 2006 09:20:01 -0400, "Mike Hunter"

Ford is lucky it never sold the Pinto (or much else) in Japan. The Japanese government takes public safety very seriously and they don't mind making an example out of any corporation/executive who puts it at risk.
The Toyota recalls are world-wide. World-wide, Toyota sells more cars than Ford. Also, the Ford recall is a continuation from last year when they recalled over six million trucks for the same problem.

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Obviously you prefer to believe only those things you chose to believe, and will not change, even though Ford was exonerated in all three instances. Search the NHTSA and the Congressional Record for the facts, WBMA. ;)
mike

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Mike Hunter wrote:

Why should that be a surprise -- since Toyota sells more than most others?
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How do you feel about projections? Based on projected sales released by each company at the beginning of the year, Toyota is expected to surpass GM in total worldwide sales in 2006. I don't know for sure, but I am betting that Toyota is doing at least as well as GM at hitting their sales targets so far this year.
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