Help! Oil Drain Bolt Stuck on '92 Accord

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On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 19:38:14 -0700, Michael Pardee wrote:


AAAARGH! I was getting a friend's 66 Chrysler 'Special' (It was an Unmarked Luxo-barge for Government use) ready for the summer and couldn't get the lug nuts off. He called and asked how it was going. Fine, except...
Guess you don't know the lug nuts on that side are LHT, do you?
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But it sure builds up manly muscles trying to get them loose. At least it feels that way.
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On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 17:08:56 -0700, Michael Pardee wrote:

LOL! I knew I wasn't THAT much of a wimp!
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Hi: Yes, I was going counterclockwise on a Honda, so I think the direction is correct. I was thinking of trying an air impact gun to get the bolt off (using a 1/2 in. drive and a steel impact socket), but I'm not sure how much PSI to start out with. 90 PSI coming out of the compressor translates to about 400 PSI out of the gun, so I guess it's about 1:4 in vs. out. Anyone happen to know how much PSI (out of the gun) I should start out with? That's assuming, of course, that it's alright to "fight fire with fire" by using the air gun at all. Thanks. - Paul S.
On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 13:54:48 -0400, Linuxiac <"at yahoo.com "> wrote:

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I'd be eyeing the air gun at this point, too. I fear the threads in the pan are already in bad shape, and that the plug has been fastened in. I hope it isn't epoxy!
The advantage of the air gun is that you are delivering straight torque rather than levering it. Even sockets want to lift unless you can apply the same amount of support as you are applying torque. As long as the impact socket is a nice fit and it can be set on straight rather than a bit cocked I'd go that way. The torque is nowhere near linear with air pressure; 40 PSI is probably a good starting point. I doubt you would even get impact action at that pressure, but you can always go up :-)
If the plug is fastened in or badly cross-threaded or both, all is not lost. NAPA carries drain plugs for Hondas in single and double oversize. There are complications, but let's hope for the best.
Mike
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Thank you Mike for your very helpful post. I have a Campbell Hausfeld compressor that goes up to 100 psi (just used it to repaint the hood of my '92 accord...THAT was difficult), so like you say it's probably best to start low with the air pressure and gradually work my way up. I'll let you guys know how it goes tomorrow. - Paul.
On Thu, 5 Apr 2007 19:20:36 -0700, "Michael Pardee"

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On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 22:28:03 -0400, Paul S wrote:

How did the paint come out, and what kind of gun do you have? I bought a fairly expensive Craftsman compressor (150 PSI/ 45/90CFM) for two reasons: DA sander and spray gun. The DA definitely needs it, and the best gun I can find is about 40 CFM @ 45 PSI!

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Hi - I used a Mastercraft gravity fed gun at 35 psi for this job. There was the whole adjustment thing with the paint feed, airflow, and spray pattern which had to be reckoned with, so I practiced for awhile in the back yard on sheet metal. This was a repaint of a rosewood brown colored hood on my '92 accord, and the OEM shade variations on the swatches were a bit tricky in terms of a good match. Especially with all the sun-related fade, since this car spent most of its life in North Carolina. Maybe a custom scan would have been better, as you can still see the shade difference on the finished hood at night under fluorescents. It's not that big of a deal, but it is noticeable if you look for it. Since it was a hood, the fenders had to be blended along with putting on new striping. I never realized the extent to which automotive painting is such a subtle skill, and it was difficult learning how to slowly build up mist-like layers of the primer and paint without going too fast. By the time I made it to the clear coat phase, I felt like I'd earned my pay. The repaint wasn't perfect, but it was a first for me in terms of body work, and I think in that capacity it turned out pretty well. As you say, there is no greater satisfaction than doing a job like this yourself...regardless of how things evolve, you never stop learning. And of course, there's always next time to do it even better! - Paul
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On Sat, 07 Apr 2007 18:13:42 -0400, Paul S wrote:

Yeah, painting is an art and requires practice. I did the doors on a Celica I had and tried to match the fade, but didn't work. The upper part of the door matched the lower (unpainted) part, but the doors looked darker than the rest of the car.
Then I did three cars, a VW for the boss' friend, a pickup for the boss, and an '83 Tercel AWD Wagon. These were complete, so there wasn't any blending to do. By the time I got to my Tercel, it was fantastic. I used Urethane with a Pearl topcoat, in yellow. LOL! THe car glowed in the dark! But I drove it mostly at night in the winter, so this was a Good Thing!
Urethane is great; not quite as easy as BC/CC, but when it cures you can wet sand it and buff it and the finish looks (IMHO) at least as good as a Clear Coat finish!

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Michael Pardee wrote:

In aircraft manufacturing, a simple device is used that fits on air tools between the tool and the incoming air line. It is a simple "volume" control that is adjustable from full on to full off by a series of click stops. Sure wish such was readily available on the "civilian" market...
JT
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Actually my air gun has an adjustment like that on it.
G-Man

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Hi To G-Man and Everyone Else Who Was Nice Enough to Respond About My Stuck Oil Drain Bolt Issue:
I finally got the bolt off today!! Hurray!! It's the simple things in life..... No, actually it was the air gun, which worked like magic at 75 psi. It's a great tool, as long as you use it to take the bolt off but not to put it on. No sign of any leaks yet with the new oil, but I'll keep watching just in case. Looks like I may have dodged a bullet. Replaced the washer, painted some anti-seize compound on the threads of the new bolt, and hand torqued it to 33 foot pounds,
Thanks again! - Paul.
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Let the fun begin.
;-)
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I wouldn't have guessed you'd get off that lightly, but let's celebrate victories when the fates allow!
Mike
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Thanks, Mike...I am definitely celebrating the fact that I won't have to go through the hassle of another oil pan. I topped things off with a brand new Bosch Premium oil filter, and I'm good to go....ready for the trans-Canada highway this summer and another 185,000 miles. And speaking of miles, I am determined to take this '92 accord past the half million mark - it's an ego thing! Thanks again for your help and encouragement. - Paul
On Fri, 6 Apr 2007 20:32:36 -0700, "Michael Pardee"

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On Fri, 06 Apr 2007 17:04:06 -0400, Paul S wrote:

Great. Glad to hear you didn't have to shell for a new Oil Pan. What a PITA!
Congrats! (A job well done feels good, doesn't it? No matter how much huffing and puffing and cursing it took along the way! ;)

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Wow...that sounds pretty neat. I wish one were available too. - Paul

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This may be a similar regulator that I am familiar with.
http://www.skygeek.com/5401.html
JT
Paul S wrote:

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Looks like a great idea for people who don't already have a dial type regulator on their compressor. - Paul.
On Fri, 06 Apr 2007 23:50:52 GMT, Grumpy AuContraire

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On Fri, 06 Apr 2007 17:36:53 +0000, Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

They are, you have to look. And they aren't cheap!
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