Honda "Drive by Wire" question... what if the power goes out?

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Don Bruder wrote:


LOL, interesting turn of phrase.
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The temp gauge should be pointing to about 2 o'clock (according to the manual) but is actually down to about 4 o'clock. obviously the idea that the car is running too cold is ridiculous (unless Santa has taken up residence under the hood and is making it snow).
so what's up with the gauge saying she's cold? just a bad gauge?
mdr
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It could mean a worn out thermostat. If the interior heat is lower than normal, it would indicate that.
Or maybe the plug and socket for the sensor is just in need of a clean. Contact cleaner is best but WD40 will work also.
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Mark wrote:

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thanks. I'll check that. cold enough in TX to be checking your heater these days...
mark

that
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My 96 Accord and my friend's 00 Accord, both temp gauge point to 4 o'clock. I believe this is normal for a Honda. My 01 corolla's temp gauge points to 3 o'clock.
Ted

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manual says it isn't but I wonder if it has always been that way and I just didn't notice.
mdr

that
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Well, how is the heat in the car?? if it is hot enough, then it isn't your thermostat...
Fwed
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More than likely a bum thermostat. Don't let run cold too long, it'll cost you in fuel mileage, and make it sludge up faster.
Erik
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Elle wrote:

If these guys' thinking had predominated, we'd still be living in caves and hoping the fire doesn't go out.
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I think you are operating under the mistaken impression that the "drive by wire" system is referring to the steering gear. It does not. The only part that is "drive by wire" is the throttle. Instead of having a conventional linkage or cable between the accelerator pedal and the throttle plate in the intake, the accelerator pedal is connected to a rheostat which feeds positional information to the car's engine management computer. The computer then uses this information to open or close the throttle based on all the inputs. Toyota, Ford, GM, BMW, and others have been using such systems for several years in an effort to improve engine performance, reduce emission, and increase fuel economy. I see some complaints from Toyota owners about lagging response in their fly by wire systems. I have a Ford with a fly by wire system and did not even realize it until I looked through the shop manual.
Failure of the fly by wire throttle system is not more dangerous, or likely, than the failure of a traditional throttle cable (I've had two of those fail in my life). The most likely failure mode is the engine dropping back to idle. I feel certain that you'll be able to control the car if this happens.
See http://automobiles.honda.com/models/engineering_overview.asp?ModelName=Civic+Sedan
Regards,
Ed White

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Too many years ago (high-school years), I went to pick up a friend to go to school. As I pulled into their driveway, which was on an incline, I had to tap the gas pedal to get up the driveway. I hadnt realized it, but one of the motor mounts was broken, and when I tapped the pedal, the engine twisted up on one side, "pulling" on the throttle linkage, and thereby going wide-open-throttle. I immediately locked the brakes and turned the key off just a couple of feet away from their garage door :)
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mst wrote:

With the electronic throttle control servo failing in the WOT position and ABS second guessing your braking, you would likely have gone right through the garage, both the front door and the back wall.
Pete C.
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That would have ruined their breakfast !!!
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wrote:

I woudln't go that far but you would have at least spilled some milk.
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Pete C. wrote:

But the traction control system would keep the car going in a straight line. =)
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Yea, even if you didn't want it to.
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Pete C. wrote:

Do you have a cite for this assertion?
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And what does this have to do with "drive by wire" throttle systems? The Civic does not have a steer by wire system.
On the other hand, I do own two farm tractors that have drive by hydraulic systems. They have no mechanical link between the steering wheel and the front wheels. It is all handled by hydraulics. I had a line blow once and had to steer off the road with the brakes.....
Ed
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"C. E. White" wrote:

One of the times the split brake pedal is quite handy.
Pete C.
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I'm getting a real kick out of reading all the wire=boo!, mechanical=yeah! luddite comments. Must be a buncha young whippersnappers with no history under their belt. Two cases in point. One, blown hydraulic hose on a '67 Ford Mustang. Fortunately, I got it to the side of the freeway before the fluid was completely drained. Second, '72 Dodge van, borderline stripped spines of universal joint (mechanical) to hydro steering gearbox finally reaches yield point and suddenly way to much slippage of rotating steering wheel yields little/no corresponding front wheel response. IOW, I'm coming hard hard a'stabard, but the front wheels are not!! Both incidences were not "catastrophic" but I can assure you they were too damn close for my tastes and I was damn lucky to not suffer a "world o' hurts"!
Bottom line: shit happens
nb
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