How much brake fluid would ge good?

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Hmm, so, just put the new MC in and attach the hoses slightly and then bleed the master cylinder? Interesting approach. I guess just bolt it onto the booster and and attach the hoses. I like the fact that it
would be connected to the brakes which I could pump from. I may have misunderstood you of course...
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That's my usual approach. I wrap a shop rag around each fitting and bleed it by pressing the pedal and keeping the reservoir full until the rags are getting wet. Then I tighten the fittings and bleed each wheel until the fluid is clear... I rarely see bubbles come out, just murky fluid. It's a really lazy approach but it works for me. Disclaimer - I have not had to deal with ABS, and this may not work well with ABS.
Be sure to wash all the areas well when you are done.
Mike
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It's my understanding that the conventional system should not be affected by the presence of ABS. The fluid chambers are different, so I don't see what one fluid would do to the other fluid in another reservoir.
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ABS Master Cylinders are much more complex inside.
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They're pretty stiff. They won't move very much at all.

Provided you've bench-bled the new master cylinder, there won't be any air left to get into the lines. If you hook everything up again and the pedal feels as firm as it was before you began, then there's no air in the lines, and a full-bleeding is optional (but a good idea anyway).
If air does get in there, no, it's not horrible. It will eventually be ejected at the wheels. Occasionally air can get trapped in the rear caliper's mechanism and be a bit difficult to remove. There's a workaround if you run into that.

Hope it helps.
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You got air int he cylinder, the new one. you're going to have to push it out via the lines anyway, who cares if theres a little more air int he lines? Its not a big deal, since you're gong to be pushing the rest of the crap out. look at the system, and apply a small amont of common sense.

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scube wrote:

Your thinking was correct. Flush the system AFTER replacing the master cylinder. Remove the fluid from the reservoir of the old master cylinder first, replace the master cylinder after you've bench bled it (check your service manual for bench bleeding instructions), and then flush the whole brake system until you get clean fluid from each caliper/wheel cylinder. I strongly recommend AGAINST draining the whole system and then trying to bleed it. There will be so much air in the system you'll be bleeding it for a long, long time.
Eric
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Eric wrote:

OK, here's one of my old posts which describes bench bleeding a master cylinder, http://tinyurl.com/o5t6q .
Eric
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scube wrote:

How much brake fluid would be good...hmmm...interesting question. As a start, enough to fill all the lines and the reservoir.

Flush ALL of the old fluid out and use only new fluid. And be sure to bleed the brakes following the manufacturers recommended procedure for that car.

I'm more than a bit concerned by your questions because they tell me you don't have a lot of experience working on brakes. Brake work can be done at home, but someone at the work site has to be knowlegable in how a brake system works. My strong suggestion is that you either ask a friend who has that knowlege to sit with you or that you have a mechanic do the work. Brakes are not something you want to have fixed just part of the way.
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The order of bleeding for the '93 accord is Rear Right, Front Left, Rear Left, Front Right. I'm going to have to figure a way to tackle the pushrod freeplay issue. Okay. I got my refurbished MC and so I'm just waiting for the opportune moment, like when I have a 3day weekend or something... I've always got AAA to drag me to the mechanic ..
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Well, to answer my own question, I used a little less than half a quart of brake fluid. I probably would have gone through the whole quart, but I couldn't get the rear left valve loose.
Using my flare wrench, I couldn't loosen the rearleft bleed screw. The head is rounded and I don't know how I should go about turning it w/ out breaking it. Any suggestions?
Once loosened I can replace it with a new bleed screw I guess.
Any one w/ experience here? Thanks!
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if its already wrecked, use some penetrating oil on it, and a small pipe wrench shold do the trick. Get a new one from the wrecker or honda.
scube wrote:

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I was afraid the penetrating oil might contaminate the brake system. Is there a compatible lube I could use in this application, one that might be better in a 'brake systems' situation?
It's a pain because I didn't get to finish flushing my Brake System. I got the new MC on and made sure to bleed that, but I couldn't drain all the lines. The line going to the rear left tire is the guilty bleed screw... I'm not horribly worried, I just I wanted to get that old fluid out of that line. I also hope all that old fliud stays in that line and doesn't migrate throughout the rest of the system, but I guess it makes sense that it would eventually mix together, but hopefully not too soon.
Thanks man!
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On 5/29/06 2:08 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@j55g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "scube"

If you know you are going to replace it anyway, try the vice-grips.
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E Meyer wrote:

Yeah, this is what I'm thinking. I need to make a run up to the junk yard and see if I can locate one. Maybe a few, I doubt I'd find my identical car, just similar ones a year or so apart. I couldn't find simple bleed screws anywhere, just the fancy ones that have valves or something in them so you can bleed them easier. I've got a one-man brake bleed kit which is quite simple to use, just a bottle w/ a tube going to the bleed screw nipple, so I'm not interested in these more expensive screw types.
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Did you check with the counter people at Autozone? IIRC, they keep ordinary bleeder screws behind the counter for a few dollars each.

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Elle wrote:

sweet, I'll check that out. I've got a MC core to return....that's great!
I'm curious how much fluid I'll lose when I pull that old screw out.
Thanks alot!
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scube wrote:

That would depend on how many times you press the brake pedal while its out.
-jim
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jim wrote:

oh sweet, I had a hunch that was the case, for when I opened the other bleed screws there was just a slight drip until I pressed the brake.
How long is too long to let brake fluid sit around before you use it in an opened container. We've been told that it collects water, but any clue how long is too long?
I'd like to report that after about 6 or so days w/ my new MC the brakes are like new. At first I thought there was a bit too much play in them, but after driving to and from work a few times I don't notice it, and the pedal doesn't sink anymore at hot temperatures.
There may be a slight amount or air in there, when I was bleeding the MC I just kept bleeding and bleeding, eventually I'd seee more airbubbles in come through the tubes ... so..?
Ah well, thanks so much all for the great advice and tribulations. I am very pleased at the results of several of my adventures w/ my car in the past few months, including CV axles, new front struts, fixed cruise control, and clean MC. It went as smooth as it did with all of your help. Thanks again.
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News==----
Newsgroups
=----
It depends on the humidity. Around here where the humidity is always around 100% a few minuites is all it takes , but never use brake fluid from a container that has remained open overnight unless you live where the humidity is Zero.
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