How to tell a genuine Honda Accord (05) Bumper from After market?

Page 1 of 2  
I recently had an animal run into my car and it destroyed my bumper. I took my ride to the Honda dealer for repair and my insurance is Geico. I made sure that I requested an original OEM bumper. I was able to get an OEM on my windshield that cracked for no reason, so I want to make sure that the car stays with original parts unless of course "I" happen to actually cause damage due to my neglegnece. SO far, things just happen to this car that is beyond my control.
Is there anything to look for as far as identifying the bumper as original OEM? It is the front bumper by the way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ask the bodyshop. They will have been told by the insurance company what to use. If they've been told to use aftermarket, you can either phone Geico and try to get them to pay for an OEM bumper (good luck!), or you can top up the insurance company's money to have the bodyshop buy an OEM one.
OEM is considerably more expensive than aftermarket unless you get a used one, and is considerably better quality. Used OEM is fine.
If the rebar is also being replaced, make sure that's OEM as well. Aftermarket rebars are badly made. The bumper skin will assume the shape of the rebar, so if the rebar is misshapen, so will be the skin.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I told the Geico man I wanted OEM and he said "no problem on such a minor thing." Since the Geico man and the Honda people seem very buddy buddy, I need to know how to tell that it is OEM. I have a $250 deductable and I would have to pay out of pocket for and aftermarket one when I could buy that on my own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
YOu might try asking someone in the parts department at your Honda dealer if there is a way to tell. Also if there is only one Honda dealer in your area, the bumper would probably have had to come thru him if it is original.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...
No reason they shouldn't be buddy buddy. Markup on parts sold to insurance companies is huge. If you really, really want to know, tell them you want to see the parts number sticker, bag or tag that comes with it.
Earle
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There will be a Honda parts sticker on the back, plus the molding die is marked up a certain way. You won't be able to see this without removing the bumper from the car.
You can do one of two things: 1) ask the bodyshop to give you a copy of the invoice for the bumper (price removed of course), or 2) ask to see the bumper when it comes in.
Anyway, I don't think you have anything to worry about. If you were told you were getting an OEM bumper, then you're getting one. The "buddy buddy" thing is probably just because they deal with each other all the time on business.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on the age of the car, too. Many insurance companies have a policy of using OEM until the car is three years old.
Also I understand some states mandate the use of OEM parts on insurance replacements, no matter what.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These days,fixed auto glass is GLUED in to add structural strength to the body,and if the body flexes,the glass can crack or shatter.
Formerly,windshields used to "float" in a rubber gasket.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recently had an animal run into my car and it destroyed my bumper. I took my ride to the Honda dealer for repair and my insurance is Geico. I made sure that I requested an original OEM bumper. I was able to get an OEM on my windshield that cracked for no reason, so I want to make sure that the car stays with original parts unless of course "I" happen to actually cause damage due to my neglegnece. SO far, things just happen to this car that is beyond my control.
Is there anything to look for as far as identifying the bumper as original OEM? It is the front bumper by the way.
--
For what its worth, I've been told that after market body parts are not made
to exactly match the OEM parts by design. Something about patents and such.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nah, it's just that the aftermarket simply does not have the budget to engineer the molds and dies the way Honda did. The appeal of aftermarket direct-replacement is economy, not quality. They have to find ways of making the parts cheaper than OEM, and that means cutting all the corners they can.
Their materials are cheaper as well. Quality control is much laxer in the aftermarket. They simply can't afford to throw away all the production that the OEMs do.
The aftermarket does not have access to the OEM engineering CAD files and blueprints, which are heavily guarded and protected. They have to get hold of actual examples of the parts, then work backwards to obtain their own specs. This is a terribly inaccurate way of engineering a part, especially something as large and floppy as a bumper skin. And then they're only going to spend so long welding up and grinding down the molds, since that takes time and money, so...
I've been involved in the OEM process. The detailed engineering of OEM parts is astoundingly expensive, exhaustingly intricate, and is only justifiable in huge production quantities. Low-volume OEM parts are developed the same way as high-volume OEM ones, but with a price that reflects the small amortization base.
Remember, Honda made hundreds of thousands of bumpers. The aftermarket makes a few thousand. Big, BIG difference.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Actually,some other company probably makes the bumpers FOR Honda under contract. Honda buys lots of parts from local sources.Cats,exhaust parts,sensors,... that's how they keep the US domestic content high enough to qualify as US- made.
No reason why they can't make extra bumpers and sell them thru their own distribution networks.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Of course. But that's irrelevant. The working drawings come from Honda,
The point is that Honda has the budget to develop the thing properly in the first place, and has the clout to demand extremely high standards. The aftermarket has none of that.
They may not be allowed to. Honda paid for the development, remember?
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


With modern CAD/CAM technology,they can take a bumper off a car,measure it and turn out detailed specs for manufacturing molds to make their own.They can buy the raw plastic from the same supplier the OEM company uses.
For metal parts,the materials may be of lesser quality,a cheaper alloy,or not as thick a galvanized coating,or maybe no coating at all.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My experience with aftermarket body parts is that they are grossly approximate in dimensions and usually fit poorly. This can only mean either poor quality or bad dimensioning, or both.
You cannot properly measure a made bumper and make a tool exactly the same as the original. You do not exactly know the shrink factor.

They can, but do they? Again, my experience is that if they do, they're buying a substandard grade or something, because toughness, flexibility and stability are usually not the same as OEM.

And bad dimensioning. Last aftermarket bumper rebar I looked at was bowed down in the middle. The thing was brand-new, so there was no excuse for that.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok. This is the part number for the bumper (front): 04711-SDA-A90zz ($259.80). It appears to be the same. I even compared it to other cars on the lot with the same color as mine. I also noticed that the right side that meets the headlight has a little gap along the bottom. The bumper seems to be a perfect fit otherwise. I have also noticed this same affect on other cars - on the same side...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The number appears to be a valid Honda part number.
Tong Yang Plastics in Taiwan is listed in my searches as the OEM supplier to Honda for that part number. But if your car was made in North America, then likely the bumper was made by a North American supplier intead.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recently purchased a 2007 CRV ( 2.4 L Petrol engine). So far so good. Very well made car however I am getting ridiculously high fuel consumption figures. On average in City/Urban driving I'm averaging 17.5L per 100km or 13.4 mpg. This is what you would expect from a truck not a brand new Honda. The worst consumption I could find on web reviews was 19.6mpg which is a far cry from what I'm getting. Am I missing something?
The car hasn't had it's first run-in service yet. I'm currently using RON 95.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My 2005 gets 17 mpg on a good day city, they will tell you break in etc... but my experience is the CRV is OVERstating the fuel MPG. best on highway I get is 23 MPG...Yes I know what some will say driving habits etc...I know... Not happy with the MPG Period,... I am sure yours will improve as it breaks in but not that much...If you find the reason send me an email as I have brought mine to dealer twice and all they say is all OK....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll keep you posted but no way are they getting away with 13 mpg.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2-wheel drive or 4WD/AWD?

Why hi-test? Doesn't the CRV call for 86-87 octane? You're wasting money using a higher octane than specified.
check tire pressures.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.