I broke off my Oxygen sensor

Page 1 of 4  
In the process of trying to replace my O2 (Oxygen) sensor on my 1993 honda civic EX, I broke the old one off. I tried some usual stuff, knocking it with a hammer, liberal WD-40, running the car for a bit to
heat up the manifold. Anyway, TINK! it broke. Any suggestions?
Two pictures of the sensor and manifold
http://img416.imageshack.us/my.php?image=exhaustmanifold7eh.jpg
http://img416.imageshack.us/my.php?image=o2sensor9it.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Danny Beardsley wrote:

First of all, WD-40 is not a penetrating oil, claims to the contrary by the manufacturer and thousands of users notwithstanding. It's a little late now, but really, you should have used Kroil, PB Blaster, or one of the other purpose-made penetrating oils rather than WD-40. Guess you will remember that next time :/
Now as to your immediate situation - that sucker is broken off in a very difficult way. I would personally suggest, if you have access, dropping the downpipe so the bottom of the manifold is open, and then trying to drill it out with successively larger drill bits. If you are lucky the drill bit will "catch" and spin the remaining piece out into the manifold (this is why I suggested dropping the downpipe.) If you are less than lucky, you'll end up drilling it out to the threads, in which case a spark plug thread chaser tap should clean them up.
You may find it easier to remove the manifold from the car; I haven't ever worked on a Honda so I don't know how difficult access is vs. manifold removal.
Needless to say, put some anti-seize on the threads of the new O2 sensor, and next time you go to replace one, before you get to the point of breakage, try heating the manifold around the sensor with a torch, pref. oxyacetylene if you have access to one.
good luck,
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Liquid Wrench penetrating oil. Soak repeatedly. Then pull all the garbage out of the center of the O2 sensor that is still in the manifold, and use an EZ OUT, or just drill the sucker with a large drill bit until it spins off on its own.
Lg
WD 40 is $hit in a can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or you can also use a pipe tool that when you turn it counterclockwise, will grab the inside of whatever is left in there and will come out. I had a similar problem with my lawn tractor.... the drain pipe for the oil was way too short and wanted to lenghten it. Well somehow, it broke off right at the edge of the engine block and I used one of those pipe tools that goes inside. I got it at home repo (depot) for not too much.
Good Luck,
Fwed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fweddybear wrote:

Hmm, I've never seen what you're describing, but it sounds like something to add to the bag o' tricks. Is this a plumbing tool? I will have to look next time I'm at Home Despot.
nate
PS - I have never had any luck with EZ-outs. They always seem to break on me.
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Because I have to *anneal* mine first, the big ones, by heating with a propane tourch and then letting them air cool. It takes the brittleness out of them.
Lg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, they are sold at home depot....when i had this problem, i didn't know what to do either until I went there and started asking around..... one of the people there showed me it....and told me it works wonders...forgot how much it is, but I don't think it was too much.... it comes in three sizes....well the one i have did...
good luck,
Fwed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

just don't bite well enough.
I had a thought, though. The threads are jammed because they have tried to weld together, with the "pull" direction being the main force. When the EZ-out is seated, how about a few judicious taps with a hammer (or whatever will fit in the space available) on the end of the EZ-out to try to weaken those welds?
MIke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Me too. I wonder if I am doing something wrong? I usually end up breaking the EZ-out in the screw I need to remove. That then makes the job twice as hard since the EZ-outs are so hard. -------------- Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think it's a matter of drilling a deep enough hole for the EZ-out to go into,if you don't get deep enough,the stress is at the EZ-out's thinner,weaker section.That may be why some like the shorter,square-type of "EZ-out". Also,the EZ-out,when biting into the screw,expands it,and makes it harder to turn.
The EX-out has to be hard in order to bite into the screw and not get chewed up itself.It's hardened tool steel.
Some people prefer a left-handed drill bit,where the drill is used in reverse and aids in turning out the screw while drilling into it.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Excellent idea. LEVERAGE IS YOUR FRIEND. Long handles are in fashion.
Lg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| WD 40 is $hit in a can.
Popular Mechanic's article says it's good, so I bought a can : it cannot loosen rusty bolts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TE Cheah wrote:

Probably because it's become "common knowledge" that it works; kind of like "Budweiser is good beer."
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Budweiser is beer?
--
/"\ Bernd Felsche - Innovative Reckoning, Perth, Western Australia
\ / ASCII ribbon campaign | German words of the year 2005:
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bernd Felsche wrote:

LOL. Reminds me of that joke about having sex in a canoe.
Ulf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

option available, then it's better than nothing in a pinch). It works well for cleaning up oily tools, for getting wet ignitions going, and leaves a nice smell on your hands; manly (sorry, Elle) and pleasant. It will also restore ribbons if you have a dot matrix printer around. Some people have used it as diesel starting fluid, but I've never had the occasion.
When I was a cyclist I used the WD-40 chain lube system. Every weekend I'd spray the "power train" (chain and everything) with Gunk, hose it off, and spray it with WD-40. It's a lazy way to keep the chain clean and lubricated enough for light use, but the chain does wear faster than it does with real chain lube. Oddly, sometimes bicycle brakes work better (don't chatter, more even grip) if the rim is wiped with a bit of WD-40... testament to the limitations of WD-40 as a lubricant.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael Pardee wrote:

I agree with Mike. It cleans up tools really well.
I am restoring an old VW bug and its rust just laughs at WD40. A much better choice is PB blaster or Kroil for penetrating oil.
Remco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure, if all a man wants around him is other manly technicians.
I advise "Goop" or similar, followed by ordinary soap, then, for men, cologne or aftershave. (Tip: Amazing how huggable men are when the scent of even a little aftershave is in the air--I'm not proud of it, but with enough aftershave, I'll swoon even before men of a different political party affiliation.)
Anything but that WD-40 (or PB Blaster, etc.) odor...
Brandy? Rav?
I've stopped bringing penetrating oils into the house for even little cleanup jobs at the kitchen sink, because they make the whole house reek for a day.
Happiest of New Years to all. Be safe, find peace.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elle wrote:

So using that handy dandy WD40 spray can as room refresher is out, then? :) May all your Hondas keep running.
Remco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Remco wrote:

Completely apropos of nothing, but I actually love the smell of gear oil. I can't quite warm up to the limited slip additive, however...
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.