Just ordered an grounding strap for 99 Odyssey

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Our 1999 Odyssey has been shocking the heck out of us all winter. We've had this vehicle for a few years now and I never remember it being this bad. I just ordered a "stop shock" grounding strap from
eBay. I'm hoping this will help a lot. I called all the local auto- parts stores and not one of them carried this item.
Anyhow, have any of you had luck with grounding straps?
Mike
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Mike wrote:

------------------------------------
You might have more luck spraying the seat covers with a staticide, or by wearing a different pair of pants / jacket.
'Curly'
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yes,the charge buildup is on YOU,not the car. I just brush my knuckle against the door frame.
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Jim Yanik
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I agree, too. Drain straps were fairly common in the 60s to stop static popping in AM radios. I think carbon additives in tires mostly put a stop to that.
I've used antistatic sprays on the driver's seat before, and it helps for a day or two. I even got tired of brushing my knuckle against the latch, so I just live with the ZAP.
Mike
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Carbon has been added to tires since about 1920. Carbon is what makes tires black. Absent carbon, tires are WHITE.
Carbon (soot) was added to automotive tires to prevent decomposition due to ultraviolet radiation. It had nothing at all to do with electricity.
--
Tegger

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"Jim Yanik" wrote

Good plan - works every time. For me, the, uh, shock value is strictly SHOE dependent. I have one pair that just jolts the crap out of me when I get out of the car unless I hold onto the door jamb latch with my right hand's fingers as I exit the car. (There is no shock when I wear real leather dress shoes.) As long as I hold onto that latch when exiting, I receive no shocks whatsoever under any circumstances with any clothing in any season. I live in the desert southwest where it's really dry, and that dryness probably exacerbates the issue. So if that method works here, it should work anywhere.
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I don't know why;leather soles insulate fairly well,and the static discharge is to the auto chassis,not to ground. Unless your leather soles are really damp(and electrically leaky). I wouldn't depend on that pair when working on anything electric.

That is because you drain off the charge -as it is generated- by your butt sliding across the seat. Now,with the insulating shoes,try to not touch the chassis and instead brush your knuckles against the ground and see if you still get a shock;I doubt you will.

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"Jim Yanik" wrote
(There is no shock when I

I'm confused about the draining off the charge as I slide across the seat. I thought I was building up a charge when sliding across the seat. (These are 2004 Accord EX cloth seats. I have had the same issues with previous cars: '97 Civic and '91 Civic.) And yes, my point was that with the "insulating" shoes, I don't need to touch the chassis in order to prevent a shock, as there is none.
When you refer to "the ground," as in brushing my knuckles against the ground (which is how I normally walk) ;-) do you mean the concrete the car is sitting on? I suspect you do -- I'll try that today.
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When you hold onto the door frame and slide. When you aren't "grounded" is when your body builds up a significant charge.

Insulating shoes would RETAIN the body's charge,conducting shoes would drain it(if contacting a "ground");that's how an anti-static strap or shoe works in electronics repair(I'm an electronics tech),it has a resistor and connects to a earth ground to slowly drain off charges -as they are generated- by your clothes. They actually make shoes designed to drain static charges,you have to be on a conductive mat or surface.they make static draining floor coatings,too. I had to take a anti-static course every year as part of ISO9000 procedures for my company,wore anti-static lab coats,wrist AND heel straps,and tested every day to be sure they were working.I used to work on equipment sensitive enough to measure the charge generated when I moved just an arm or leg when ungrounded.

a reference; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Static_electricity#.27Static.27_electricity
sit naked on the seat,and you won't build up a charge either.Skin itself is not a good static charge generator.Don't do it in public,though!! Then the police will charge you!
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"Jim Yanik" wrote

Since that sentence is incomplete, I don't know what you're saying.

OK....
Regardless, today I wore my "bad" shoes and got out of the car without holding onto the door frame. I, uh, dragged my knuckles across the parking garage floor, and when I touched my car there was no shock. Pretty good! However, I tried the same in my home's garage, which has metal rods in the concrete. When I dragged my knuckles across THAT floor, I got a shock.
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On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 17:12:27 -0700, Howard Lester wrote:

Not sure if you are joking or not. I am going to approach it as if you are not.
When he said "ground", he didn't mean the ground you walk on. He meant electrical ground. IE the body of the car. Hold the door frame, slide across the seat and exit the vehicle, maintaining contact with the metal the entire time. You will not build a charge.
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"Joe LaVigne" wrote

I wasn't joking, because that is what he intimated. For years I have done exactly what you describe, and it is foolproof. Jim seemed to have suggested a different method, and, having tried it yesterday, it apparently does work (as long as there's no metal in the concrete!).
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Mike wrote:

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Now you've got me curious - doesn't the alternator belt just run from one grounded pulley to another?
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Michael Pardee wrote:

belt. it's got "anti-static, oil & heat resistant" written on it - didn't order it specially. and i'm reporting the result!
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Strange but true, I guess! Definitely worth a try.
Mike
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Static builds up on your body from sliding your butt across the fabric seat,as you exit. There's no way an alternator belt in the engine compartment would discharge your body charge.
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I got into the habit of holding the door frame as I touched the ground getting out of the vehicle.
No more sparky....
t
Jim Yanik wrote:

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Jim Yanik wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_de_Graaff_generator
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The belt in a Vandegraff generator rubs against a collector brush,inside the globe. Didn't you look at the diagram? Or read the text?
Also the support tube insulates the two pulleys from each other,unlike a engine block and metal brackets suporting the alternator.(and ground straps on the alternator and engine.)
you don't get a charge buildup rubbing an insulator against a metal object.It's strictly insulators/insulators.
BTW,I have actually held a VDG globe and had discharges from my toes right through my combat boots,in USAF PMEL tech school.They didn't insulate as well as the instructor thought they would.Didn't hurt,though.
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