Maintenance Reminders redux

Page 1 of 2  
Hi
I thought the group might appreciate this short tale. I shared with you that I purchased a 2006 Honda Accord. It has now turned over 20.000 miles. Like clockwork, I got an email message from the service
facility at the dealer from whom I bought the car that it was due for it's "20,000 mile service."
Well, I dug out the owners manual, and looked for a schedule. Instead, it told me that the computer would tell me when the car needed service. No mileage schedule. I remembered the collective wisdom of this group and that this subject was discussed, so I dug through the archives. No mileage schedule. I searched the internet. No mileage schedule.
So, I replied to the email from the service facility, explaining that all of the information I had was that the car would tell me when it needed service and if the service manager knew something I did not know, then he should share it with me. Particularly, I wanted to know if there really was a mileage schedule that supplemented the maintenance minders.
No reply after a week.
I think I will take my car, when it really does need service, somewhere else.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
File

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sorry,that was a typo.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can bring your car someplace else, but if that someplace else is another franchised dealer, you will be faced with the same annoyance. You may even face the same problem with a well-run independent garage if you end up on their mailing list.
You see, it is the business of businesses to try to drum up business. Advertising is how they grow; part of how they manage to turn a profit and thereby employ persons (such as yourself) to perform the work that needs doing in the course of doing business.
Caveat emptor, remember? The smart buyer spends only what is necessary, and most of all, /knows/ what is necessary.
Having said all the above though, I find myself compelled to say that there is no such thing as too much service. Your car is like a woman: it loves attention and will respond well to it.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just got a service reminder for my 94 GSR that was stolen,stripped and torched the end of June. No email addy listed so I could update them and have them delete me and that car from their database.
I've already updated Carfax in case St.Farm sells the carcass and someone tries to refurb and sell it.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A sad end for a fine car.
I'm so glad I live in the sticks where I do, well away from the anarchy of the cities.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's not the annoyance, it's the deceit. If there is a maintenance schedule based on mileage, then Honda or their service departments should tell us about it. (I suspect there is.) It is also the failure to respond to my email request. That is what lost them a service customer. If they can take the time to send an emil to me, they can take the time to reply to mine. I know they are busy. So am I.
Lacking information about a "secret" maintenance schedule, my best bet seems to be to go by the owners manual (something that is often recommended on this group). The manual specifically states that I should have the car serviced when the maintenance minder says to. So, that's what I plan to do. There are no listed alternatives for more frequent service.
I do not think that going beyond service recommendations is cost effective anyway. One could change oil every 1000 miles, every 10,000 miles or somewhere in between. Where is the point at which more frequent oil changes do so little good, that they are simply not worthwhile? Clearly every 1000 miles is too often. But is 10,000 miles too long an interval?
On my previous Honda, I decided I would go with what the owner's manual said, which was every 7,500 miles, despite the local Quicky Lube's insistence that it should be every 3000. The car had just turned 200,000 miles and was running like a fine watch when it had it's collision with a concrete barrier which severely damaged the suspension.
Speaking of which, I now regret that I did not take the salvage value from the insurance and keep the car. I think I could have repaired it for less than the salvage value, especially if I had harvested good parts from the local automobile recycler. Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is not (aside from the servicing that arises from observed need).
What the dealership is trying to do is to get you to do more work than the Maintenance Minder indicates. If you were running that dealership, you'd do the same thing. The service department is a real money maker, mostly because nobody takes care of their cars.
I think you need to ease up here.

Two explanations: 1)( They got somebody else to send out the mass mailing on their behalf, or 2) they're like a lot of companies that do very little email and thus never check it.
I agree it's pretty silly to have a published email address, send out messages using it, then not respond to replies.
It's also possible the dealership didn't want to put any answers in writing for fear of later getting in trouble. Did you include a telephone number?

You RTFM! Everybody knows you're not supposed to do that!

Not if the Maintenance Minder says it OK. That depends on the use of the specified oil, too. You can't put just any old junk in there and rely on the Maintenance Minder.
Considering your desire to abide by the Owner's Manual, I assume you will use the correct Honda-specified fluids when it's time to change them? Honda fluids are more expensive.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, with one exception. The service facility I plan to use (a different Honda dealer) has always given me excellent and prompt service. Their prices have generally been lower than independents (e.g. timing belt replacement). They use Castrol GTX, so that is probably what I will go with.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wait--hold that--
--they're more expensive to purchase. They are NOT more expensive to operate the car with.
It's the cheapest man who spends the most.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep in mind that for the most part, those service intervals are heavily, heavily influenced by the marketing group. They absolutely need to compete on that level with everyone else who's claiming no need for service for 100K miles or whatever. Marketing groups serve their own needs, no one else's.
Also, the car makers are building them to be obsolete. And for the most part, the sheeple respond. When you see things like "7500 mile oil change interval" or "we'll tell you when", it may be true--or it may be that "if you follow our generous interval, nothing bad will happen to you during the 3 or so years you own this car before your stupid burning lust to spend $30K takes over and you go buy a new one".
For the information you're looking for, you need to find where the engineers go for beer and wings and buy them a round one night.
Going beyond service recommendations is not always a waste of money. There is a point beyond which it's throwing money away, of course. But given the variability of manufacturing, it may be that you have the engine that doesn't quite respond as well to the 7500 mile intervals as another car might--but will be very happy with a 5000 mile interval, for example.
You wouldn't know that until after the engine blew up, so what do you do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 15:07:27 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"
This may be true, but I see no compelling evidence. When I was a kid in high school, an automobile with 50,000 miles was due for a major overhaul. 100,000 miles on an engine was so rare that it was a news worth event. Now cars go 250,000 miles with no replaced engine parts at all except for maybe spark plugs and timing belt. And they still have good power and compression.
I had my 93 Honda far longer than any other car I ever owned and I tend to keep 'em for a long time. It was still running great and as far as I could tell had another 100,000 miles in it. Some plastic bits had broken off, but they were easy to replace.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's just say that longevity at best is a byproduct of other design and engineering decisions. The main decisions have to do with lowering the cost to build the car while making people happy for about 3 years. If in the course of doing so they end up making a car that lasts longer, so be it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nor do I. I do see copious evidence of cost-cutting, especially on non- critical components. This is not the same as building in obsolescence.

My dad had 140,000 miles on his '58 Dodge Regent (Royal) by 1970. It was the talk of the neighborhood at the time. The engine smoked and the 2- speed automatic leaked badly.

Try over 400K these days.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tegger wrote:

there /definitely/ is built-in obsolescence, but it depends on manufacturer. honda & toyota are finally rumored to be getting into it, but for the vintage vehicles we drive, it's not an issue.
it's quite a difficult engineering task. in terms of technology development, it used to be detroit closely followed by the euros. did a project on it at uni. the crazy thing is, some of it costs more to implement, but it pays back with increased sales.

japanese, not domestic. they're better than they were, but when chevy make a big deal out of 200k, you know that's stratospheric for them. contrast that with the high mileage club over at toyota.com!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, we had a 1956 Desoto with a 350 ci hemihead engine coupled to that model transmission. The gear selector was a set of push buttons at the far left side of the dashboard with a mechanical linkage to the transmission.
Even with a two-speed, that thing was a rocket.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. And one thing we kids discovered was that you could push all the buttons behind the faceplate at the same time. Drove my parents nuts. :)
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's the same as not caring if the cost-cutting causes the car to become obsolete beyond a certain (short) point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That, and the desire to not piss off the environment lobby, which has considerable political clout these days. Long oil change intervals are supposed to be more "environmentally friendly".
And a 10K interval IS too long if you're not using a synthetic.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tegger wrote:

it depends. the latest engine computers keep combustion pretty clean, and that leads to better oil life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.