******* MYTH OF TIRE ROTATION...... ***************

TRUE OR FALSE?
Tire rotation refers to the regular practice of switching the tires... Purpose: Tire rotation helps to equalize tread wear and is critical to
gain.
ANSWER:
BULLSHIT! TIRES USUALLY LAST 2.5 YRS, NOT 4-YRS.
TIRE COMPANIES WANT TO MAKE THING APPEARS LONGER, THEY ASKED YOU TO ROTATE. YOU LOSE TRACTIONS. MY ADVICE IS TO KEEP THE DRIVING WHEEL WITH MORE THREADS, THAT SHOULD BE YOUR CRITICAL CONCERN. ACCIDENT HAPPENS IN WINTER/RAINING SEASON DUE TO INSUFFICIENT THREAD, NO TRACTION = FLIPPING OVER THE HILL.....Heehee.........
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What a load of rubbish. Is anyone stupid enough to beleive this crap, when you don't even have a basic grasp of the english language ?
Moron.
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It was a troll. Ignore it.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher Freelance science writer
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You're right. ever time i get out of the car and look, my tires aren't rotating, they're just sitting there. and i'm expected to believe that they wait until i'm in the car driving instead of watching them, then they rotate? just to have a joke on me? come on.
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You are a very strange person.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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Jakthehammer wrote:

freak though you are, you have a point there - you /do/ lose traction. i don't rotate tires very often for this reason, and if i do, i have to take it easy until the tires are re-worn back to the correct rotation and cornering sense.
http://www.mini2.com/forum/2nd-gen-mini-cooper-s/147821-tire-rotation.html

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On many vehicles now-a-days tire or even tyre rotation is a thing of the past having been left in a time warp of 1970 ish.
the reason behind this is the move to FWD and the newer train of thought in fitting different size/width wheels at each end. My new E65 has wider wheels at the rear than the front I know that BMW isn't the only manufacturers that does this.
The choice is yours but remember if its a new car the chances are the front tires (tyres) won't fit the rear rims.
Hugh
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On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 09:59:40 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@h-gee.co.uk graced this newsgroup with:

Not entirely true. Front wheel drive cars wear out the front tires significantly faster than it's rear tires. You'll be replacing the front tires at nearly a ratio of 2:1 in comparison to the rear tires.
The reverse holds true for rear wheel cars (of which many cars are still made that way).
Rotate them and you'll get longer life out of all four tires. Otherwise, you'll be constantly changing a set of tires. And many manufacturers don't make the same exact tire every year. You'll end up with two different sets of treads and/or manufacturers if you constantly only buy one set of tires.
Also, maybe you mean moving front to back/back to front but you don't actually take the tires off the *rims* when you rotate. You merely move the entire tire/rim as a single unit.
However, as you mentioned, if the front and rear tires are of different sizes, the ONLY rotation you can do is left/right and not front/back.
-max
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Not necessarily.
FWD cars have the front wheels doing all the driving, the steering, and the braking. Compare that to RWD cars, where the front wheels aren't doing the driving--they're just turning and braking.
Tire wear is more likely to be more even on a RWD car because of this division of duties.
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On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 07:51:23 -0500, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"

Front wheel drives are also the drive wheels. That creates additional stress on the rubber. Pulling foward and being pulled forward cause much different wear on a tire.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

I've found that all of my rear wheel drive vehicles still wear the front tires first due to engine weight/braking and steering also takes its toll. OTOH, I have found front end wheel alignments duration much more durable on the rear drive cars.
Of course, I'm living in the past...
<G>
JT
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Max wrote:

actually, that's not correct. each time you rotate, the tires have to scrub to the wear pattern of their new position, so overall average can be worse. your statement is the common belief based on people tending to notice tire wear more when not rotated simply because there will always be one or two wearing more than the others.

no, just one or two. tire dealers love to sell sets though.

and? what about cars that have different sizes front/rear? as long as you have decent rubber front and rear, and the same tires on each axle, you'll be fine.

which on a performance vehicle is immediately noticeable with inferior traction. and you can't even do that if the tires have a rotation direction, which many do.
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wrote:

Even on all-wheel-drive vehicles?
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