New Accord oil life

OK, just picked up the 07, and it has this new oil life indicator dohickey. Talking to the salesman, he says my old 2004 with the 10,000 mile standard service claim to an oil change, might have been
too optimistic.
I'm going to guess that the algorithm for the oil life is some combination of milage, revolutions, time, and maybe RPM (or engine heat - or just how smart can the computer really be!?) Does anybody know? The owner's manual appears not to say.
Nor does it suggest about what the miles will come out. So, if I just drive this thing like a creampuff, most miles at 65mph on the freeway, most *time* at 20mph on the same freeway (!), anybody have a guess when the bell will ring? Does the dohickey do anything different for the *first* oil change?
Inquiring minds want to know wtf I'm driving around now!
I guess I'll know by about next Easter ...
Thanks.
J.
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JXStern wrote:

translation: "we hate these things - we want customers to come back much more often so we frighten them by trying to spread fud".

service the car like it says in the owners manual. ignore the dealer.
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On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 02:36:30 +0000, JXStern wrote:

On my 06 Civic Si, the first change was at around 6500 Miles. The second one is getting close now (20%) and I am nearing 12K...
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JXStern wrote:

By all reports the system does work along those lines. GM was the leader in this area with it's oil life indicator technology which uses a combination of engine revolutions, start-stop cycles, temperature, etc. to estimate how used up the oil is.

I suspect that your indicator will says time's up somewhere between 5,000 and 10,000 miles. Personally I like to do the first few oil changes early in hopes of flushing out the high concentrations and wear metals found in new engines. With my TSX I did the first two changes when the oil indicator got down to 40% remaining life, which happened at around 3500 miles each time. Now I plan to go down to 10% on the indicator, but am using synthetic oil for a little extra safety margin. It looks like with my driving I will be doing oil changes every 6-8k miles.
John
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wrote:

Thanks.
It's a curious game, fun in some small, obscure way. Me, I'd prefer to see the algorithm and a daily readout of all parameters, if that's how it's going to work. But hey, I'm a geek.
J.
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You think it's geekiness, or more wanting to establish trust in the design? The latter would be my interest. Still, at present I would be very much inclined to trust the design, based on my understanding of it.
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I purchased the 2006 Accord V6 in Jan 2006 and the Oil Change indicator finally came on at 4700 miles after mostly city driving. I took it in before the maintenance reminder came on and the dealer wouldn't touch it. A quick drive by of the quick oil change places and they wouldn't touch it either.
Elle wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds reasonable. The old simple minded Honda recommendation for the V-6 was 3,750 miles for "severe" conditions and 7,500 miles for "normal" conditions. The maintenance minder is able to do a much better job of telling where in that range your use has been. 4,700 miles of mostly city driving is closer to the severe schedule, which is quite reasonable for stop and go driving.
The great thing about these new systems is that they should end up saving people money by extending service intervals when the conditions allow it. This also saves resources as still good engine oil isn't being turned into low grade burning fuel oil (which is where most recycled motor oil ends up) and it saves oil filters. On the flip side, people who would have ignored the service intervals now will have the car reminding them. Hopefully that will result in fewer vehicles being trashed by insufficient maintenance.
GM deserves a lot of credit for being one of the first large automotive companies to develop and push this technology. I'm also glad Honda has gotten with the program.
John
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John Horner wrote:

had usage-based metering for a while and real-deal spark spectroscopy has been on F1 vehicles for a number of years.
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jim beam wrote:

You are quite right that BMW was way ahead in this kind of technology. GM was the first large scale manufacturer to push it out across a mainstream product line. I think of BMW as being more of a niche manufacturer, though with their growth in recent decades I probably need to readjust my calibration.
John
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't understand -- your Honda dealer and the other place "refused" to change your oil, inspite of the indicator and inspite of you asking for it to be done? What was their reason? 4700 miles is plenty for 11 months of stop and go driving. It also fits the old time and mileage rules, so there would be no reason to suspect an inaccuracy in the indicator. What did the dealer actually recommend?
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