New Engine Block

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I have a 2008 Honda Civic LX, 5-speed.
About two weeks ago the local Honda dealer had to install a brand-new engine block due to coolant leakage from the block. (It was done under
an extended Honda warranty!)
I am not much of a car expert/mechanic, so here's my question: Is there anything in particular I will need to pay attention to with regards to this new engine block?
--
tb

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What was the problem? The dealer should have documented the problem on the service paperwork.
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On 8/5/2013 at 5:43:55 PM H. Ford wrote:

The block started leaking coolant... Honda became aware of this problem a few years ago and decided to extend the warranty for the engine. That's how I ended up with a new engine block.
--
tb

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tb wrote:

that's too vague for the mechanics among us, but if that's all they told you, we are left to wonder
GW
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email.me:

There are a number of TSBs dealing with coolant- and oil-leaks from poorly- cast blocks that have either cracks or porosity. The OP's vehicle apparently falls under one of those TSBs.
--
Tegger

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On 08/06/2013 07:28 PM, Tegger wrote:

On some 2006-08 and early production 2009 Civics, the engine (cylinder) block may experience coolant seepage that can result in engine overheating. For this reason Honda extended their warranty of the engine block to 8 years from the original date of purchase, with no mileage limit.
In my case, the Honda dealer had to replace the whole engine block free of charge.
--
tb

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On 8/6/2013 9:05 PM, tb wrote:

What happened at Honda that used to set a standard for car quality?
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It's still there. Cracked and porous castings are a problem for anybody that casts metal, especially aluminum.
--
Tegger

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On 8/7/2013 1:02 PM, Tegger wrote:

exactly true :)
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On 8/7/2013 at 1:02:20 PM Tegger wrote:

Well, I bought a honda hoping that I would not have to deal with these problems. IMHO it does not speak very well for their QI department...
--
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I don't think you'll find perfect castings anywhere, from anybody. All automakers inspect their blocks prior to building the engine, but defects sometimes only reveal themselves after lots of vibration and many heat/cool cycles.
Considering how many engines get built in any given year, flaws bad enough to cause problems are extremely rare.
--
Tegger

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On 8/8/2013 11:15 AM, Tegger wrote:

Yet, this kind of problem is virtually unheard of with the '90s vintage models. So that should be telling something, right?
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I don't think anything's changed at all over the years.
I see - one mention of oil leaks due to casting porosity from 1991, - one mention of the same thing from 2001. - one mention of cracks in the casting from ~2010 (the date of the TSB).
--
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On 08/08/2013 04:07 PM, Tegger wrote:

one tsb can cover 10 instances or it can cover a million - not an accurate measure of the extent of the problem.
--
fact check required

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On 8/8/2013 4:07 PM, Tegger wrote:

And did Honda issue service bulletins for all those model years?
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Yes. What I posted above was all the TSBs for defects in castings: about one per decade.
In other words, there's been no change in the historical incidence of defects in castings over 20 years.
--
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On 08/09/2013 04:40 AM, Tegger wrote:

again, a tsb is no indication of the number of vehicles affected.
--
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On 08/09/2013 12:40 AM, cameo wrote:

it's pretty much meaningless. if a quality defect is present, it's unlikely to be present for all the factories that manufacture the same part - it's usually restricted to just one source. honda engine blocks are produced in ontario, suzuka and ohio to my knowledge - so which one is it?
if one is present in the product of all three plants, then there's a fundamental design/spec issue, not a production quality issue..
--
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On 8/9/2013 12:46 PM, jim beam wrote:

I think that is a logical statement. I recall that GM had some problems in Corvairs with the cast alum. engines
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On 08/08/2013 11:15 AM, Tegger wrote:

not true. lots of complex forms like jet engine components are cast, and their porosity rate is zero. that's high end. cast iron frying pan porosity rate, which are as cheap as it gets, is zero.
casting porosity is the result of solidification voids. these are either due to:
1. gas coming out of the liquid as it cools, just like the air bubbles you see in ice that make it not clear.
2. shrinkage between the metal crystals that grow on solidification.
both mechanisms are very well researched and very well understood. they are easily avoidable with any competent producer that's not cutting corners on the alloy, its preparation, and the casting process.

not porosity - that's there day one. you can "fudge" its presence with the old fashioned "stop leak" preparations like crushed walnut shells, but they don't last forever. once they've softened, passed through, then the leaking starts again.

no, they're what the manufacturer considers to be "economically acceptable", i.e. the cost of repairing failures is less than the cost of the q.c. necessary to eliminate the failures in the first place.
--
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