New Honda owner

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Hello all,
First day as a new Honda owner. Got a (new) 2007 Accord EX for my daughter yesterday, and we are quite happy with it. Just a really well
built car.
One feature I'm surprised to not see is the "auto-door-lock" function. This is where all the doors lock as the vehicle reaches a certain speed (15-20 mph) after the doors have been opened. I'm used to it on all my Dodge vehicles, and didn't even think to ask about it on this one. Am I missing something, or is this feature really not here?
Anyway, I also got the 8 year, 100K mile, 0 deductible warranty on it, so am looking forward to many years of trouble-free operation. Glad to be a Honda owner!
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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Dan C wrote:

If you find it, let me know but I don't think it's there. I broke with tradition<g> and actually looked through the manual and was unable to find that feature for my 2006 Accord.
You're right about one thing, though. Great cars!
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 08:44:02 -0500, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Thanks, I will.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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I would not have purchased my 2004 Accord EX-L if it had this feature. What purpose does it serve? If you need your doors locked, hit the button right before you put on your seatbelt.
Automatically locking doors ranks right up there with DRL's. I won't buy a car with these pseudo-safety features.
As an aside, yes, wear my seatbelt (always have and always will) and no, i do not support a seat belt law.

agreed!!! :~)>
bob z.
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 13:54:39 +0000, bob zee wrote:

That's nice. What does that have to do with my question?

It locks the doors without any required action by the driver/passengers, as the name of the function would seem to imply...

Yeah. No shit. What does that have to do with my question?

Again, your (unrequested) opinion is noted. In the future, don't bother replying to a question of mine, if you don't know the answer. Have a good one.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 22:09:29 -0500, Dan C

I love it... an owner with an attitude !! Dare anyone say something he doesn't like.
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 09:18:08 -0500, wrote:

Whatever. It's notable that you snipped the entire post, and don't bother actually addressing anything. Was there something inaccurate or wrong about my points?
Didn't think so.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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On 7/12/07 8:00 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@lan.invalid,

As far as I know, that is a American-mfr-only feature. Never encountered it on any Japanese cars. Personally, I find it irritating and useless. I would spend some time researching how to disable it if it showed up on any of my cars.
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wrote:

My '00 Toyota Avalon XLS had it and it was a real PIA.
On stopping, the driver's door could be opened but before any passenger door could open, they (or the driver) had to hit the unlock button.
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My wife's 2001 Chrysler Sebring has auto locking doors to prevent outside access, but one can always open the doors from the inside, except the rear doors it the child proof setting is activated. My mid 90s Chrysler has auto locking, but it needs to be activated by the dealer. I hadn't been in favor of the feature until a few years ago when car jacking started becoming a problem.
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 14:26:10 +0000, E Meyer wrote:

Thanks for your opinion. I find it a useful feature, whether you do or not.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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On 7/13/07 10:05 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@lan.invalid,

I'm curious - what do you find useful about it?
As near as I can tell, all it does is force the emergency response team to have to break into the car to get you out after the crash.
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On 7/14/2007 9:54 AM E Meyer spake these words of knowledge:

Having your door locked can help to ensure that your door does not open when you did not intend it to.
This can be very useful in the event of a crash.
It can also be useful in a situation where others may open your door when you did not intend to have it opened, such as when you are in heavy traffic in NYC.
As a result of these simple facts, I lock my door every time I get in it, with the same automatic repetitiveness as buckling my seatbelt. If it were automatically done, it would save me having to do it. I fail to see why or how it can be a problem, or why it should even be a question.
RFT!!! Dave Kelsen
--
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maintaining a free civil government. This marks the lowest grade of
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That advice is a generation or two out of date. Before the '60s there were no significant standards for either door latches or door locks and door locks could possibly improve door integrity in an accident. Since the implementation of US NHTSA standards c. 1963 door locks were not relevant to latch integrity. If you look at a lock in any car since the late 60s you will see it only affects how the release levers actuate the latch and does not affect the holding mechanism. In the NHTSA's study of Rollover Mitigation http://tinyurl.com/2q9xc9 the report acknowledges the role of door latches but not door locks in preventing partial ejection.

That is useful. You should always lock your doors when people present more of a threat than traffic and terrain do. Otherwise, my take is that we are somewhat safer with the doors unlocked. As a first-aider, I dread the thought of coming across a car fire with entrapment and finding the doors locked or jammed. I can deal with other problems better if I don't lose time trying to establish an exit route. And it is important to remember that central locking and unlocking depends on electricity. If anything has happened in the accident to kill power (like the battery was destroyed on impact) rear doors are going to stay closed until somebody can get to the locks manually... and much longer than that if child locks are active.

You are entitled to your opinion. I'm just glad none of my cars have the "feature." Doing it manually when you feel it is valuable makes sense, having the car do it stupidly does not.
Mike
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 14:54:34 +0000, E Meyer wrote:

As some others have already explained some of the reasons, I'll just add one more. I said in my original post that it was my daughter's car, she's a college student, and it makes me feel safer knowing her doors are locked, even if she doesn't always think to lock them (manually).

I suppose that could happen, but thinking like that, you had better not even go out the front door of the house. You might get hit by a bus.
As for breaking into the car, it's not very difficult to break a window, especially for well-equipped emergency personnel.
--
"Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


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I am one of those pathetically prepared people who are always mindful of such things. I am aware that I rarely carry anything that can break a car window, although if I have no alternative I have a small pocketknife that would have an outside chance if I hit hard enough near an edge. Tempered glass is amazingly tough.
It is really only an issue in fires and potential fires, since the other crisis - submersion - requires a window to be opened before a door can be opened anyway. For other accidents it is almost always better to leave everybody where they are and protect the scene until the pros get there. Moving accident victims gives me the shivers.
Mike
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 16:27:36 -0700, "Michael Pardee"

On a recent Mythbusters episode, the crew thoroughly tested several myths about submerged cars, windows, etc. Among other things they found was that a power window unit continued to work for 45 minutes after the door was submerged. That surprised me. One other interesting thing they found was that those emergency hammer gadgets you sometimes see advertised on cable that are supposed to break windows actually work exactly as advertised. The hammer head is a sharpened cone. Even under water, bashing the side window with one of the things caused the window to disintegrate into little cubes of glass.
http://www.lifehammer.com /
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher
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wrote:

Those devices have actually been a normal tool for at least as long as I have been working - back in the '70s when I had to do simple metalwork an automatic center punch http://tinyurl.com/2ptt5x was indispensible. I don't have one any more, though - I don't like metalwork!
As long as the battery isn't damaged the power windows (and locks, if the controller hasn't wigged out) should continue to work for some time when submerged. Even ocean water isn't a great conductor compared to the admittance of a window motor.
Mike
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Seems like a good idea to me, it was in the news some weeks back that a lady and her kids drowned in their mini van after it rolled into a pond. Is it true that the tip of a spark plug (electrode broken off I reckon) will do the same thing? I've got enough old plugs, maybe I'll tie one to a piece of wood?
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 18:57:33 -0400, "MAT"

has a blade for cutting a stuck seat belt (in an emergency), so why not just get one of them.
Ace Hardware has 'em.
Elliot Richmond Itinerant astronomy teacher
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