News Report re: Hybrid Accords

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though

Hello, I understand your points. I have a neighbor that once owned a monster sized pick-up truck. He had a full sized camper mounted on the bed of the truck. He told me that a major wind storm almost blew over the truck. He said that he was afraid to drive the truck whenever there was a storm. He does not have a camper mounted on his new truck. Please tell me if you agree with this statement: "Monster sized pick-ups and SUVs are more likely (than most cars) to roll over in a high speed accident. The reason is because monster sized pick-ups and SUVs are more top heavy than most cars." I should note that I have driven my Honda Accord in a major windstorm and did not have any problems controlling the car. It would NEVER blow over in most windstorms. Jason
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 14:29:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Jason) wrote:

ANY large truck or SUV is. doesn't have to be monster sized (like the one my wife's cousin drives - an f350 whose wing-mirror I can walk under, and where my 2yo can walk under the engine without hitting her head.

used to have a 98 daihatsu hijet as a work vehicle. We'd take the 4 rear seats out, and literally lioad it to the window level with gear, inlcuding some 350lb of batteries. COG was really low (lower than most cars, in fact, since the engine was mounted under the front seats) a moderatly windy day would blow it around even then. Any high-sided vehicle will wander, when its very windy. Heck, my 87 and 97 minivans wander when its windy. Its what they do.

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monster

so much

disadvantage to

shogun
pickups to

less likely

accidents take

intersections.
inside small

sized SUVs

We are in agreement. Last year, I had to use a rental car and took the cheapest car on the lot to save money. It was Toyota Echo. I was amazed that a company like Toyota would build a car like the Echo. It's really narrow and was even taller than my Honda Accord. It also had really small wheels. Despite the fact that it is a car--it is very high profile (aka top heavy). I drove the car thru a wind storm and had a very difficult time keeping the car under control. I was driving at a high rate of speed on the freeway and the wind almost blew the Echo into a car in the other lane. I have driven my Accord thru the same sort of windstorms and never had trouble controlling the vehicle. I know that the drivers of monster sized SUVs and pickups trucks that have a camper mounted in the bed will agree that High Profile vehicles are more likely than cars to turn over in a high speed accident or major wind storm. Even high profile cars like the Echo are also at risk of turning over or turning upside down in a high speed accident. Do you agree? Jason
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flobert wrote:

Interesting theories, but the real world data is very straightforward, for example:
"In the latest crash figures available from 2003, provided by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (see chart below), there were 142 fatalities per million registered vehicles for the smallest cars. That figure drops to 108 fatalities for the next larger class of cars. For large sedans, that number drops to 61 per million. "
That was from:
http://www.edmunds.com/ownership/safety/articles/106748/article.html
IIHS and others have studied this issue extensively, and the occupants of smaller automobiles die in accidents much more often than to those in larger cars. You can try to handwave it away with driver demographics, but that doesn't add up either.
John
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Small cars *can* be made much more resistant, but then it's not all other things being equal, "ceteris paribus".
J.
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OTOH, anybody who gets only 33/38 in a hybrid complains bitterly - especially that city rating. If a Prius gets below 40 in any weather short of snowy roads there is something wrong - our first generation has *never* dropped below 40, in town or on the highway (round trip where applicable). Combine that with the improved performance of hybrids, especially off-the-line, plus the spectacularly smooth power delivery of Toyota's system, and it's easy to see why cheap cars are cheap. I wouldn't buy an economy car if I can afford better.
Mike
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 16:50:48 -0700, in alt.autos.honda you wrote:

You're not paying for better physics, or golden engines. cheap cars are cheap because they don't pack in the luxuries. I've been in plenty of cheap cars with smooth power delivery. i've been in expensive cars with terrible power delivery (Jaguar s-type diesel for starters, any USDM diesel except the sprinter, and a buick I rented back in 03 spring to mind.)
Friend had a bottom of the range [but new] ford fiesta, power delivery was a lot smoother than in my [then] 8yo volvo, despite the volvo costing about 3.5x more when new (this was in 98)
cost and smoothness are two different things. The price between my 360 and his fiesta was not in smoothness, but in other areas, like how I could get in my boot almost everything he could get in his car with the rear seat down too, i had more power, RWD to his FWD, and heaters, wipers and other severe weather gear everywhere (oh, and I be hit by another car at 40-50mph, and still be able to tow them home, very important that!)

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My wife test drove the Accord and Civic hybrids and the Prius. She went with the accord because she did not want to give up so many creature comforts. The Toyota hybrid SUV gets mediocre gas mileage too at a high sticker price. That fancy interior in the Acura will never pay for itself either. Hybrid is just one more feature. If you pay for it in the Accord you are rewarded with a little more power and better gas mileage.
wrote:

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wrote:

What he said, though it was brave of them to try.
Now, if they want to take the I4 and put on a double hybrid boost so that it outperforms the V6 and still gets better mileage than the plain version, we might have something!
J.
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(Note: also posted elsewhere in the topic)
I have had an 03 Civic Hybrid and now have an 05' Accord Hybrid. If I had to have one or the other, in today's market and gas prices, I still choose the Accord. It is my trip vehicle and the 03 Civic did not cut it. Wandered, under powered (Do NOT get the CVT Civic if you pull out onto busy 50 mph two lane roads, regularly), and uncomfortable, even with the Leather interior (aftermarket) upgrade I had on it.
Yes, I like power and my first new car was a V8 back in the day - '70s. The Accord Hybrid (as is true of ALL current Hybrids) will NOT save you money over the life of ownership, fact - read any study. The premium cost is too high to be made up by gas savings. Heaven help you should need something unique fixed. (The AC radiator/condensor is $750) So, why own it.
It is the fastest production Honda Accord with 15 hp ('05) more than the non-hybrid V6. The Hybrid gets 29 mpg in town (and I do get about that) and I get 34.5 mpg at 80 mph average highway and the rated 37 mpg if I average 60 - 65 mph. The non-hybrid 05 V6 comparably equipped, actually gets 18-22 city and 27- 32 highway.
So, I ride in luxury (the Accord starts with everything and adds hybrid), get the best mileage of any vehicle with comparable performance, can comfortably transport 5 and have LOCKOUT-ABLE trunk storage (the Prius has no secure storage when you leave it for service or leave valuables in the "trunk").
I work around and build military hybrids and chose to own one, just to say that I do. Status - which is the only reason to own one - today. That will not be the case in 5 to 10 years.
BTW: Yes, I am hunting for some lightning bolt symbol magnets to put on the side to flaunt that it is a hybrid,
Honda did just fine, by me. (except for the lack of a spare, which I have solved - after market.)
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"..get the best mileage of any SIMILAR SIZED vehicle with comparable performance,..." CC

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