OEM Online Honda Parts Sites

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My 91 Civic is due for some new ignition wires. I started checking OEM online Honda parts places that I have used in the past. Shipping seems to have shot through the roof. From
reports here and some other shopping, I have become vaguely aware that dealerships increasingly offer parts online at discounted internet prices. So I googled for {online OEM Honda parts [my state]}. The second hit yielded a dealership five miles from me selling prices as competitive as I have seen at Majestic and San Leandro Honda (long-time online dealers), but of course without the shipping charge. I get to pay sales tax, but I am obliged to do so anyway even with online purchases.
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If you buy online from a supplier who does not have a "business nexus" in your state, they can't collect sales tax from you any you're not "obliged" to pay it
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Inigo Lopez de Loyola wrote:

Bzzzzzzzzzzt! Wrong answer! At least it is in all the states where I have a passing knowledge of their revenue act and that's a couple dozen.
Just to make sure though, why don't you make a couple of large on-line purchases from some firms that don't have the business presence or nexus in your state? Then, tally up your receipts and call your state revenue department and tell them you purchased goods in a foreign state for use in your home state but didn't pay any taxes. See what they say about that. I'm sure they'll be more than happy to send you the appropriate reporting form.
Granted, it's an honor system in 99% of the cases but just because it's an honor system does not mean you are not obliged to pay the tax.
OTOH, those that don't report it are probably at 101%<g>
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Say What? wrote:

not for online transactions - the supremes nixed that. http://www.cbpp.org/12-13-99tax.htm

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jim beam wrote:

Jim, please re-READ what you have quoted. It's pretty clear but you do have to read and understand what their ruling was. I stand by my original post.
Quote from your link, above:
Who Will Remit Sales Taxes on Internet and Mail-Order Sales?
The vitality of the sales tax as a critical state and local government revenue source has been eroded in recent years by the rapid growth in mail-order and Internet sales. Sales taxes are due on mail-order and Internet purchases just as they are on purchases in stores.(1) But a large majority of the sales taxes due on mail-order and Internet purchases made by individual consumers and a significant share of the taxes due on purchases made by businesses are effectively uncollectible. States and localities are unable to collect these taxes because the Supreme Court has prohibited states from requiring mail-order and Internet merchants to charge the customer for the tax and remit it to the customer's state unless the merchant has a physical presence or "nexus" within the state's borders. This means that although an Internet merchant like Amazon.com presumably has customers in every or nearly every state, it can only be required to collect sales tax from customers in its home state of Washington and a handful of other states in which it has built warehouses or stationed personnel.
If the seller does not charge and remit the tax, laws require customers of Internet and mail-order companies to pay the state and local sales tax directly to their home states. However, compliance with this self-remittance requirement is almost non-existent in the case of individual consumers and is spotty in the case of businesses that make purchases from Internet, mail-order, and other "remote" sellers. The combination of weak tax compliance by purchasers and a sharply limited tax collection obligation on the part of remote sellers is eroding the sales tax base of state and local governments
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Say What? wrote:

what part of: "...because the Supreme Court has prohibited states from requiring mail-order and Internet merchants to charge the customer for the tax and remit it to the customer's state unless the merchant has a physical presence or "nexus" within the state's borders" is unclear?
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jim beam wrote:

I saw it but kept on reading which, apparently, you did not.
What part of...
"Sales taxes are due on mail-order and Internet purchases just as they are on purchases in stores."
and
"If the seller does not charge and remit the tax, laws require customers of Internet and mail-order companies to pay the state and local sales tax directly to their home states. However, compliance with this self-remittance requirement is almost non-existent in the case of individual consumers and is spotty in the case of businesses that make purchases from Internet, mail-order, and other "remote" sellers.." is unclear to you?
Remember, if you will, that the OP said that he had no obligation to pay the tax himself. He is obliged to pay it. As you have pointed out, the merchant selling to him is NOT required to collect it unless they have a physical presence or nexus in his state. The synopsis of the USSC decision also points out that the tax which is due is "effectively uncollectable," I said as much in my post.
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Say What? wrote:

in other words, you're arguing against yourself. well done.
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"jim beam" wrote

You'd make a good lawyer.
;-)
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Howard Lester wrote:

I wouldn't retain him based on this thread.
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Howard Lester wrote:

Not really. It is important to understand the law before arguing it, and obvious Mr. Beam doesn't.
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jim beam wrote:

You really need to do something about your reading comprehension.
"Ignorance can be cured but stupidity is forever." You appear to be either terminal or a troll.
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jim beam wrote:

Well, actually you both are... It is legislation that was passed that prohibits any form of internet taxes except when a vendor has a physical presence in the affected state...
But the short of it is, generally no tax..
JT
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On 12/26/2007 8:05 PM Grumpy AuContraire spake these words of knowledge:

Altogether wrong.
Remember that we're talking about state taxes here.
What the Supreme Court said was, in essence, 'you owe the tax, but we're not going to force the seller to collect it.'
The buyer still owes it, and the state can (and if it knows about it, will) collect it.
RFT!!! Dave Kelsen
--
Brian Kernighan wrote, "Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code
in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as
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Dave Kelsen wrote:

So, did you pass fifth grade civics?
It appears that YOU have the problem parsing here...
JT
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On 12/27/2007 10:11 AM Grumpy AuContraire spake these words of knowledge:

I'll accept your apology after you ask a tax preparer in your state. Note that I'm not asking you to take my word. Do the research; it's easy. You can also ask a representative of the Revenue department, in your state capital. Rather than making yourself look stupid here, why don't you try that?
If you get some other answer, by all means let me and all the others here know, and I'll be the one looking stupid. I'll be reading and waiting.
RFT!!! Dave Kelsen
--
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On 12/26/2007 5:06 PM jim beam spake these words of knowledge:

No, Jim, he's not. It's just this simple.
1.) Here's how it works out: purchases accrue tax to the state and at the rate of the purchaser.
2.) The business which is the seller is not mandated to collect it (if they do not have a physical business structure in the state of the purchaser.)
2.) does not eliminate 1.)
If you make the purchase, you owe the tax. If your state can document that you owe it, they can (and will) collect it. If your state can document that you lied about making the transaction, that's tax fraud.
RFT!!! Dave Kelsen
--
"Strange as it seems, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and
higher education positively fortifies it." - Stephen Vizinczey
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jim beam wrote:

All the supreme court did was to nix requiring the various mail order companies to collect taxes on behalf of the home states of their purchasers. However, the individual buyer is still legally required to pay the taxes to their home state. In practice almost nobody does so and in practice the states have rarely tried to enforce this law against individuals, but I know first hand that they sometimes go after business purchasers because there is enough money potentially there to make the costs of collections worthwhile.
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Say What? wrote:

Bzzzzt! Really Wrong Answer!!!
If they, (the vendor), has no physical presence in your state and the order is via the internet, NO TAX OF ANY KIND CAN BE COLLECTED.
So called "use tax" tactics DO NOT APPLY to internet sales.
(One of the very few good things our conggress critters accomplished)
JT
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On 12/26/2007 8:02 PM Grumpy AuContraire spake these words of knowledge:

When you file your state income tax this year, look for an entry about this. You will be asked to declare the amount of your untaxed out-of-state purchases; this will absolutely include any purchases made over the intarweb. If you lie, you are committing the crime of tax fraud. The chances of being caught are small, but only because the various states aren't pursuing this avenue currently, not because the records are hard to get.
If you don't want to wait until you file your taxes, ask a tax preparer; they should be popping up like jack rabbits in the next several weeks.
RFT!!! Dave Kelsen
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Whenever I think about the past it brings back so many memories...

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