oil change drain plug with valve

Has anyone here tried these easy-change oil drain plugs? They have a valve with a locking lever to open it. http://www.fumotovalve.com /
I was considering one after chainging my oil recently.
One version even has a nipple to use tubing to drain the oil into a container. No chance of stripping the oilpan threads out.
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

thing, but the possibility of total dump from a component like this? sorry, not for me. and you don't strip threads if you know what you're doing.
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If you examined the pictures,you would see the LOCKING lever and the notch it fits into,preventing unintended oil dumps.
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Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

speeding car where all kinds of debris kicks up, and it's subject to vibration. hence my position that i'd definitely never have one on my car. you are however welcome to have one on yours and i wish you well with it. [what i don't understand though is why you'd bother to ask for comment if you've already made up your mind and don't want to hear anything against it... ]
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Jim Yanik wrote:

I used a similar product from Fram once, I think it was called Sure-Drain. I ended up ditching it after a few uses because it slowed things down and protruded enough under the vehicle that I worried about the extra chance of road debris breaking it off.
I've done hundreds of DIY oil changes over the years and have never stripped a thread.
John
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I agree with jim and John. I always feared (maybe wrongly) that those gadgets would fail on me when I'm out driving in the middle of nowhere. I have never stripped the threads on my drain plugs over the years either so the appeal of those things means nothing to me.
It's your call though.
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My Integra's plug is on the rear of the oil pan,so it would not stick out. I wouldn't consider it either if it stuck out frfom the bottom of the pan.

Well,I just don't like removing the plug and the hot oil splashing all over me until I can move my hand out of the stream,especially while lying under the car on my back.
It appears the design prevents any accidental oil dump. (ball valve and locking lever)
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Jim Yanik wrote:

You could wear white cotton gloves to keep your hands clean.
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where nothing could hit it . You also had to safety wire it closed. I don't think I would trust one in the open and without a positive lock closed.
Bob
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I've had more trouble controlling the mess when changing the filter. With the plug I usually get just a couple fingers oily, while with the filter I try to avoid having the stuff run into my armpit.
Mike
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The Fumoto valve is the best thing to come along since sliced bread. I have a Ridgeline, and like most Hondas I think, it has an aluminum pan. That means BIG bucks for replacement and threads can be more easily stripped, even if you think you know what you are doing. Put the Fumoto on once and thats it for the life of the vehicle. I replaced my plug with a Fumoto (a $6 adapter is also required for Hondas) at the first oil change. I purchased the kind with a nipple so as to be able to attach a hose and run it directly to the oil catcher or bucket - not a drop of oil on the hands or floor.
The spring is very stout and I doubt there is any way you could have it fling or knocked open under normal circumstances. If I did lots off roading with my Ridgeline, I would purchase the little optional device they sell that locks the spring in place. Off roading is the only time I might be concerned with a failure but even then I would think it is remote.
This device not only makes changes a snap but it also makes it easy to take used oil analysis samples. Many people want to see how their oil is doing at certain mileage intervals rather than waiting until the final drain. Just open the valve for a few seconds, take your sample and shut it. The sample oil is replaced by simply topping off. A piece of cake!
Another good thing about the Fumoto is that it works in any position, even upside down. This makes it easy to put it in an accessable (or, if one is overally concerned, in a more protective position). On my Ridgeline, I had to position it to the side due to an exhaust part that would make it too hot to get my finger in there to release the spring (I change my oil when hot so as to increase flow rate and insure any particles are suspended).
This contraption must not be screwed in real tight, just snug like the normal drain plug. It requires a washer between the adapter and pan and also between the valve and adapter. They provide washers and I used one between the adapter and valve but for the oil pan I used one that came with the Honda filter as it was thicker. I used the Honda crush washer instead because in order to have the spring lever in the exact desired position, you simply use a thinner or thicker washer as the case may be, rather than trying to position it by tightening it further beyond just "snug". This device is very well made and the customer support, via email, is top notch. They are more than happy to talk to you about it and answer questions.
I think the whole thing, with adapter and the more expensive nipple style came to $35 shipped. That is the best money I've spent on this truck since I've owned it.
MARTY
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Marty,
That's good to hear but I agree with Mike's contention that removing the oil filter is more of a messy ordeal than the drain plug.
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I stuffed a wad of paper towels under the filter,and still got a splash on my glasses.I don't know why they don't position the filter so it does not empty when removed.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

indoors and have lunch, come out, remove filter. while you're eating, the filter drains. no more spill.
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