Ping Elle, Tegger

Page 1 of 2  
Do either of you know if the radiator temp sensors can be had at different activation temperatures?
My Civics, (Gen II), have 180F thermostats, (standard for those years),
and need a lower temp radiator sensor so as to prevent temperature modulation while idling etc.
Thanks,
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1. For newer Civics I am finding that Mugen, Mishimoto, and it seems Spoon make fan thermal switches that turn the fan on at a lower temperature. It seems these are for racing, hence I have some hope that you can find one for your generation. See for example http://www.mishimoto.com/mishimoto-honda-fan-temperature-thermo-switch.html
http://www.horsepowerfreaks.com/performanceparts/Honda/Civic/Electronics/Switches
2. Mugen for one says to get a thermostat that matches up with the thermal switch.
3. I gather yours screws into the bottom of the radiator. The late 80s ones screw into the back of the engine block. Still, it seems the interchangeability is likely from looking for aftermarket thermal switches. See for example http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FAN-SWITCH-HONDA-ACCORD-CIVIC-ACURA-75-91-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQitemZ190329540285QQptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories
4. I think I might go over to the junkyard, forage for the switch on various generations, and check to see if the mechanical fitting of the later generation thermal switches works on your older Civic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elle wrote:

I'll check this out.

http://www.horsepowerfreaks.com/performanceparts/Honda/Civic/Electronics/Switches
Exactly what I want to do.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FAN-SWITCH-HONDA-ACCORD-CIVIC-ACURA-75-91-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQitemZ190329540285QQptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories The Gen II Civics had two sensors (on some models), one in the head near the thermostat side and the on the lower radiator.

Oh, not many Hondas from 1980's in junkyards around here...
The issue is that the later Civics had a higher operating temperature for emission control reasons. I'm just wondering if there is some sort of coding to determine when a sensor will close the ground circuit.
I'm just trying to shorten the range between the thermostat and sensor.
That said, the current heat wave here will end today so this will be less of a concern. The car is not overheating but the temp indicator rises when idling until the fan kicks in. Needless to say, temperatures indicators particularly on old cars are not exact by any means.
JT
JT
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/23/2010 09:49 PM, Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

you can get aftermarket fan control units that have variable fan speed outputs - will do what you describe perfectly.
however, i'd question your rationale for this. honda tested their vehicles at extreme temperatures and if the cooling system is functioning correctly, there should be no need for augmentation. no point monkeying with fan control if the coolant circuit is blocked.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jim beam wrote:

I'll probably swap out the sensor in the radiator.

Cooling system is in top condition including a nearly new radiator. It just seems that the gap between the thermostat opening and the sensor kicking the fan on is too wide. This only occurs in heavy traffic waiting for a light. Even so, the temperature does not go into the danger zone just a little too high for my liking. My other Civics don't have these symptoms.
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You mean the GAUGE goes up and down? Or does the IDLE go up and down?
Simply swapping temperature sensors is not the answer here. There is something else going on.
The dashboard temperature gauge (like the gas gauge) has a damper component that is supposed to prevent short-term fluctuation. If that component starts to go bad, the needle will follow every movement of the thermostat. The thermostat is opening and closing all the time, especially at idle.
What's the amplitude and frequency of the "modulation"?
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tegger wrote:

The gauge will creep upward until the fan kicks in when waiting at light etc.

No sudden movement(s). Simply a creep when stuck in traffic until the fan kicks in.
Temperature gauges are not super accurate but I figure the temperature modulates upward as much as twenty degrees when it occurs...
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's likely the switch is simply faulty and in need of replacement with one exactly like it.
I've seen those switches fail three ways: 1) no power to fan 2) fan comes on too soon 3) fan comes on too late.
I suspect you have the third.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tegger wrote:

Could well be. I'll probably get around to "switching" it out maybe next week. (After all, it's been doing this ever since I put it on the road last September). why rush... (Oops, in retirement mode again).
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grumpy AuContraire ( snipped-for-privacy@GrumpyvilleNOT.com) writes:

Do you have a Honda workshop manual (OEM) for that Civic? The manual should have the specs for the fan switch in it. With an ohm meter, a good thermometer, and a pot of water that you can boil, you can check whether the switch functions to the spec (including checking a new switch).
Looks like the problem may be #3). Maybe an IR thermometer (pointed at the body of the switch) might tell you that.
These are the specs for a 1986 Accord in the OEM Canadian market manual. (I don't have a Civic manual).
Cooling Fan:
Fan-to-core clearance, 23mm (0.90")
Thermoswitch "ON" temp., 87C---93C (188F---199F)
Thermoswitch "OFF" temp., 83C (181F) or more (hysteresis 2C (3.5F) or more) [sic]
Looks like the above switch has a 'go, no go' spec (replacement context).
Regarding the '[sic]', it actually said '(hysteresis 2C (35F)'. They forgot the decimal point. Why it has what appears to be a redundant 'or more' beats me, but there was a transmission diagram, in the manual, that showed a 'Frange' (the instruction text said 'Flange'). Jap to English translation in manuals can sometimes be 'hysterical'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (M.A. Stewart) wrote in

According to my Integra's factory manual, my distributor has an internal "reak cover" to keep water off the electrics.
Japan tlanslating velly funny! Engrish speaker much raugh!
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tegger wrote:

You should have seen what it was like in the 1960's. I think that I have an old Akai reel to reel tape owner's manual somewhere.
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (M.A. Stewart) wrote in

Hopefully,he's replaced the thermostat already.(with an OEM model,and the right temp) I had the creep up/down temp gauge problem with my Integra,it was the thermostat. temp climbed up at stops,dropped when moving.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

Well, I haven't but you make a good point. I now have a couple of extra OEM thermostats and will try that first. (Besides, replacing a thermostat is less sloppy than the radiator sensor).
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grumpy AuContraire ( snipped-for-privacy@GrumpyvilleNOT.com) writes:

Get the OEM specs and test procedure for those stats, and test them. Make sure they're good. Test with the 'pot of water etc.' method. Record your results. Hang the stat and thermometer in the pot with wire. Use an accurate thermometer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (M.A. Stewart) wrote in

if the fan is turning on,there's nothing wrong with the radiator sensor.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

Well maybe since it's turning on late...
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
M.A. Stewart wrote:

The stats are from Honda for those, (Gen II), years. I put one in my other '82 and it solved an overheating problem in it. I have high confidence in the Honda labeled product.
The boiling pot test is way to involved for me.
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
M.A. Stewart wrote:

I expect that your specs for the later Accord probably are the same as my earlier Civic. Canada, (I believe), never had the complex carburetor as did we as mandated by the good ol' EPA.
Gotta luv them thar' Japanese instructions though...
JT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grumpy AuContraire ( snipped-for-privacy@GrumpyvilleNOT.com) writes:

Don't make that assumption. Get the OEM specs for your car.
Canada, (I believe), never had the complex carburetor

Maybe identical. The emissions stuff was a little less (not much) than a USA market Accord of the same year. Canada at that time lagged about 3 years or so behind USA re emission controls.
The 3Gee carbs are actually simple inside. The complex stuff was bolted/ attached to the outside of the carb. For example, the power valve (inside the carb) is actuated by an external vacuum hose connected to the intake manifold. Most other carbs incorporate that circuit inside the carb with the valve.

Some Datsun manuals called the passenger "the assistant driver"... what the hell?... don't they have mother-in-laws in Japan, and know that mother-in-laws should not assist in driving?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.