ping tegger--As seen at a Toyota Dealership

Went to the Toyota dealership to get some parts for work, and to check on some things for myself; Guess what they had on the parts section shelf? The
K&N golf ball display that totes how good the k&N filter is. I told the kid I wouldn't think a Dealership would promote an aftermarket product such as that, as the engineers do a lot of research in designing a car. He replied something to the effect that the engineers are bean counters and that on some areas they cut corners to make something cheaper. I told him of the Filter study done and it's results, but he seemed to think it was all internet garbage. I also pointed out the push for Genuine Toyota Parts on a Toyota Car, and how something like a MAF has difference specs for each car, that a aftermarket brand won't always have the desired results. In our shop we weigh the cost vs. availability and performance of such parts on a daily basis. Most of the time OEM looses over cost; but if the Dealership doesn't stick with OEM parts, why should we.
A instructor told us at a class "If the aftermarket parts world worked (such as performance air filters, fuel line magnets and such) the car dealerships and designers would use them, for in the dog eat dog word of cars every MPG and HP is a selling point.
I have a K&N in my truck, I fell for the Hype years ago. Someday I will replace it, but after reading the filter study I'll never own another one.
--
Stephen W. Hansen
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician
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That's true, but most of the K&N displays I've seen in Toyota dealerships have something to do with TRD (Toyota Racing Development). TRD does in fact sell K&Ns as OEM, but they're intended for off-road use, whether they emphasize that or not.

As you know, the dealership is just a franchise holder, just like McDonalds. They pay a fee for the right to display the automaker's logo, sell/repair those cars, and get training and documentation from the automaker. Other than that, they're free to use whatever the hell they like when repairing or accessorizing the car.
From what I've seen, the use of aftermarket parts is very common at most new-car dealerships. That's the dealer responding to consumer gripes about the cost of OEM parts.

Yes, but then again the bean counters do have a big role, as your Toyota parts guy says. There is constant pressure to get costs down, and not all decisions are good ones for parts longevity. If it were up to the engineers, the car would cost a fortune. If it were up to the accountants, the car would be a junk pile.

They're not for use on engines that are expected to last 300,000 miles without burning oil.
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TeGGeR®

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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Stephen H wrote:

Dealerships sell all kinds of aftermarket crap because they can make money on it. You are never going to talk people out of magic air filters and elixer-of-youth oil treatments.
P.T. Barnum was right!
Sigh, John
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