Prius seldom runs on batteries alone?

Page 2 of 7  
wrote:


Short trips are the big killer (same as with conventional power trains). Cold weather means the warm-up time is extended, and short trips mean the driving is mainly in warm-up mode. The rule of thumb is that a cold engine will burn about twice the fuel of a warm one, and the Prius follows that pretty closely.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What size tyres do you have mounted on that Prius, and what brand? And do they really still sell gasoline in the U.K. by the imperial gallon and not by the liter, or I suppose you would spell it litre or some modern French- or Continental-based measurement of volume?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A multipart question? Good. Ans: Prius OEM (see other thread on Prius tyres); Goodyear?; no; doesn't everyone?; historically yes.
FWIW, "litres/100Km" sounds daft. Many UKians still say "mpg".
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2004-2007 UK tire Bridgestone Turanza ER30 195/55R16 87V
(Note the different size than the US!)
UK and Canada uses MPG using imperial gallons. Canada and most everywhere else use l/100km. Japan still uses km/l.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would go partway to explaining why a US Prius gets better mileage than a UK Prius. Although I can't find the exact size, Turanza have significantly higher rolling resistance than Goodyear Integrity tires. Also the 195 versus 185 width increases aerodynamic drag.
http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/sr/SR286Rolling_Resistance_Data.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For the sake of the experimental data, I have just been outside to check my 2005 UK Prius: out in the dark dank chill with just my feeble torch for company, as winds moaned and owls hooted...
Bridgestone Turanza. Couldn't make out the associated numbers. But the tyres fit fine. :-)
I hope you lot appreciate that this effort was above and beyond the call of any duty. Where do I apply for my medals?
BTW, why don't they fit Integras in this market? Mine was made in *.jp, so they can't be any harder to find. Conflicting road demands and/or national car type certification conditions?
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks!
We will award you the Parliamentary medal of freedom (all rubber).

The Turanza has better resistance to hydroplaning and longer tread life. Here are the Consumer Reports ratings of it:
Braking - good Cornering - poor Emergency handling - good With ABS - good Hydroplaning - good Snow traction - poor Ice braking - poor Steering feel - good Impact - fair Noise - fair Rolling resistance - poor Tread wear - very good
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tuthill" writes:

Okay, so long as it doesn't bounce. (OT: OTOH, if Parliament is involved, some kind of dodginess seems likely.)

Hmm, yes. It does rain occasionally in the UK, more than in the sunny parts of *.ca.us at least. And snow has been short lately.
Ta. I shall luxuriate in that low wear and loss of hydroplaning, while maintaining the proper tyre pressures.
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Andrew Stephenson" wrote...

I was just out there too putting some more air into the Prius' tires (in response to a RayO post that spurred me on), and saw that the Integras were "Made in Japan", stamped right on the tire sidewall. If the car came from Japan (which I believe they all do), they made a conscious choice to fit yours with the Bridgestones instead of the Goodyears. Tomes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill Tuthill" wrote ...

We are weenies too. We get 44-49 depending on the trip type here in west central NJ. I also look forward to seeing what it will do in the summer months. Tomes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

----- Barometric pressure and fuel quality can make either city or highway fuel efficiency flip flop. On level ground doing 101 miles an hour my digital display says real time fuel economy above 35 but less than 45 mpg. I hesitate to believe a traditional non-hybrid would even come close to that fuel economy range at that speed. So, when someone tells their husband they only saw such and such fuel efficiency you can sure as hell bet they drove much faster than what they said they did, or their range of speed was more like an up and down 60 to 80. Can't place blame on the car. mark_ -----
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
     snipped-for-privacy@notaspammer.net "who" writes:

I read Bill's remarks as meaning "really short trips", like those which don't warm up the engine properly and give the mpg time for "recovery".
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Andrew Stephenson" wrote ...

I read it the same way. The first few miles are always killer miles. Tomes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The gain in highway efficiency is in the ability to use a lower output engine due to the availability of supplemental power from the battery. When operating at cruising speed, the engine will be running at a higher % power level which is more efficient. In this mode, the electrical drive line saves fuel by merely being there if you need it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not in three mile trips from a cold start on snowy streets, seldom exceeding 28 mph and sometimes with chains, I bet.
The weather has cleared and I'm into the 40s again (three mile trips and all).
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
     snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com "Gordon McGrew" writes:

The point where the petrol engine fires up depends on a mixture of road speed and load being imposed. "Racing starts" are sure to get it going at low speeds, in the Mk2 UK "T4" at least. If just moving away gently from traffic lights (not a common thing in the US has been my impression <g>), here in the UK I tend to hit 10mph or so before the petrol engine joins the party.

Google for recent (Jan 2007) posts by me under the Subject 'More on Prius "EV" mode'. Being all-electric is not the point of the Prius. Being efficient in its use of fuel is. Huge difference.
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--
Incorrect.
The earlier hybrid Civics were mild hybrids meaning the electric motor could
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, except Honda update as another poster noted.
An after-market switch is available to make the current Prius operate entirely on electric motors, like a Euro model. After Andrew's test I thought it would not be worthwhile, but I'm having second thoughts. Steven Scharf (SMS) posted this URL describing how:
http://www.calcars.org/prius-evbutton-install.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ISTR more perspectives on this can be had by browsing around the website priuschat.com -- mostly by folks who wanted to do it and are mentioning odd details. In a UK Euro-Prius, the "EV" button occupies the right-hand position of two switch holes to the left of the steering column. If similar spaces exist in USian models that would seem a good place to put the control. OTOH, a couple of postings mentioned re-using controls on the steering wheel.
--
Andrew Stephenson


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A good example of all electric performance that goes well beyond *very modest* is when a Prius is *instructed* to back up an incline such as a steep driveway. Mine has yet to revert back to engine power when the accelerator is *pedal to the metal*.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.