Proper oil level checking

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But HOW would it have resulted in over-filling? If the reading was between min and max, why would you add anything?
Where does it say you should add oil when observing a midway reading? You only add at min or below.
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Where does it say that you shouldn't? I suspect that many people, having taken a reading on the garage forecourt and finding it halfway down to the minimum, would indeed put more in to avoid it dropping too far. You may know that you should only add at the min level but the average motorist would probably regard halfway down as needing a top up.
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Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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Maybe it's a logic issue then. I see no reason to add when it's "between the lines". If I was supposed to add when it's below the "max" line, then the shaded area between the lines would be labeled "add oil" while the line below min would be labeled "holy crap that's low".
I see max and say to myself, stay away from there cause you could go over. Between the lines is the "perfect medium". Not too high, not too low.
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But if the oil was mid-way between min and max, why would you top it off? Midway between those 2 levels is perfect.
I still with what the handbook says. It was written by people who know a hell of a lot more than me or anonymous Internet posters about how the car was designed and under what conditions those marks were calibrated for.
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When is that new 2010 Honda tractor coming out?? hehe
BTW, we are fortunate to have such a thread as this ... just think about those poor guys with Mercedes, BMW's, etc that have no dipstick at all. They will only be able to discuss the computer and its calculation of oil level, life remainging, etc.
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Wade wrote:

frankly, that's the way it should be. the computer can be relied on - "my grandpop used to do it this way, so i'm doing it this way too" usenet ignorants cannot.
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On 9/11/09 8:28 AM, in article h8dj8s$akg$ snipped-for-privacy@news.albasani.net, "Keith W"

I've been driving for 45 years and have yet to encounter a car with a dipstick calibrated in that way. It sounds like it might make sense the way you say it, but think about it a little deeper - To come up with a dependable "warm & after a few minutes" calibration, you have to be able to reliably define the temperature of the engine, the weight and condition of the oil and exactly how long a "few minutes" actually is. The only reasonable calibration for the dipstick is the level in the pan when fully drained down.
I was taught (and several different owners manuals actually stated) that the way you check the oil when you fillup is to do it last, after everything else is completed, which means the engine has been off for about ten minutes.
I think the current Nissans have a clearer instruction about checking the oil "wait at least 10 minutes after shutting down the engine before checking".

You are partly right, it goes in cold, but hardly straight to the bottom. It goes in on top of the valve train and has to work its way to the bottom just like after running the engine. Add to that the fact that you are supposed to run the engine a little bit after changing the oil to fill the filter and to check for leaks, you still have to wait for it to drain down in order to get a good reading.
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E. Meyer wrote:

where do you think oil "hides" after you pour it in then? have you ever seen the drains in a cylinder head? what size are they?

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On Sep 11, 8:58am, "E. Meyer" wrote: "Keith W" wrote:

Unless you are in the car manufacturing business, how would you know whether dipsticks are calibrated for oil warm and engine having been run recently for several minutes, or for engine having sat overnight?
The dipstick reading X with the car having run several minutes and then stopped for several minutes, then reading something different after sitting all night means nothing. Designers could calibrate for either. They choose warm, after sitting stopped for a few minutes, for convenience, e.g. the driver has stopped at a filling station.

Some of you seem to think the specific volume of oil changes a lot from normal engine operating temperatures to cold start in the morning. I do not. Most of the volume change one sees from normal engine operating temperatures to cold engine in the morning is simply oil dripping down to the pan. Nor do I think there are meaningful specific volume differences due to temperature for any given weight or condition (assuming normal oil change frequencies) of oil.
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On 9/11/09 12:21 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@d21g2000vbm.googlegroups.com, "Elle"

OK. I give up. As much as I hate to admit it, I agree with Beam - this is a retarded thread.
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E. Meyer wrote:

it's retarded because some people [like you] don't want to learn. all this "I've been driving for 45 years and have yet to encounter a car with a dipstick calibrated in that way" bullshit is completely ignorant of the facts. just open the freakin' manual and learn what the freakin' manufacturer has taken the trouble to write down for you. any reading that is /not/ taken in accordance with the manufacturer spec is WRONG. if you measure with the vehicle on a slope, it's WRONG. if you measure with the engine running, it's WRONG. if you measure cold, it's WRONG. again, open the manual and LEARN how that manufacturer wants you to do it RIGHT.
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On Sep 11, 7:28am, "Keith W" wrote:

Like Jim B emphasized, the owner's manual also covers how to check the oil after an oil change. My 1993 Civic manual says, in the oil change section, "Let the engine run for several minutes and check [for leaks]. Turn off the engine, let it sit for several minutes, then check the oil level."
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Elle wrote:

Is that a metric or imperial "several"?
a
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a wrote:

good one!
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