Q. Factory oil additive?

We're all told that the factory, wether it's Honda or Harley put in this 'special' additive in the engine oil, to help break-in.
I think that's a bunch of crap.
If they did, then wouldn't the dealer offer an option, during the oil change, to add that fluid back in, especially during the critical break in (and soon after) period?
Why the hell don't they? Why do the factroy reps, salesmen act so secretive o is this special oil additive?
To get peopeles' imagination going, I say..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yep! You got it all figured out. No one else could figure this problem out but you. Congratulations. You don't work for our President do you?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure exactly what you are referring to, but historically engines came with "break-in" oil. I don't know all the details, but I understand it is low detergent oil that is intended to transport and precipitate the metal particles from break-in better than normal oil is.
I'm seeing a lot of info (that I haven't quite digested) about modern engines being designed and built differently in ways that either eliminate or change the requirements for break-in. The honing process is supposed to produce a more nearly ready cylinder wall, for example. I expect it varies by mfr, too.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually primarily low /dispersant/ oil.
Dispersants are the chemicals that hold contaminants in suspension until you change your oil. These are the chemicals that are defeated if you leave the oil in too long.
--
TeGGeR

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com (George C.) wrote in

A brand-new engine has many new, roughly machined surfaces that need to achieve their final finishes. As they wear in, much jagged metal is released into the oil.
Break-in oil is very low in dispersants and detergents. The idea is that the metal mentioned above will settle out of the oil and not risk recirculating through the engine, causing damage.
Once the break-in period is over (but not before!), that oil is removed and replaced with normal oil. It is not necessary (or even desirable) to keep break-in oil in the engine past the initial oil change interval.
After the first oil change interval, the nature of the metal released into the oil changes dramatically.
--
TeGGeR

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Question?
Where can you buy 'this' break in oil?

and
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Buy a new car and it comes free/included.
After the break in period, why would you want more of it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.