Question re first 3 month service

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I got an email from Honda saying my new 2007 Honda LX is due for it's first maintenance, an oil change.
Do I have to do this maintenance after 3 months, despite the fact that
I only have 1000 miles on my new car?
I thought you were supposed to do the maintenance when the oil light came on, on the dashboard?
No? What's the deal here?
I want to do the scheduled maintenances in order to keep my warranty good, but an oil change after only 1000 miles???
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.tv wrote:

From Honda, or from your Honda dealer?
Those are two VERY different entities.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.tv wrote:

The deal here is that you can't differentiate between American Honda Motor Corp, which doesn't sell or service cars, and your dealership, which does sell and service cars.
Your dealership has an automated system that begs people to come in every 3K miles and spend money.
American Honda Motor Manufacturing built an automated system into the car that tells the driver when it's time to spend money.
Two very different things, with two VERY different goals.
If you can't differentiate between Honda, the manufacturer and your Honda dealership, you're ripe for getting fleeced.
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Okay, so which one is it that controls when I have to get maintenance in order to keep my Warranty valid? Basically, what you seem to be saying is that the local Honda dealer is trying to pull a fast one and convince me that I need to do maintenance that I do not need to do, according to American Honda Manufacturing. So according to American Honda Manufacturing I do not need to do the maintenance until it comes up on my dashboard?
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That is correct.
However, you may want to peruse the Warranty booklet that came with your shiny new car. This booklet (published by American Honda) will tell you what exactly you need to do to the car in order to keep your warranty valid, this being entirely independent of what the franchised dealer wants you to do.
The dealer, of course (being an independent company from Honda), would like you to give them more money than you might otherwise bestow. What they want you to spend will certainly do the car good and not harm, but is it really necessary? Not if Honda doesn't say it's necessary. Clear as mud?
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Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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Tegger wrote:

to clarify, it specifies the service schedule, and to keep the warranty valid, the service schedule needs to be observed correctly. but legally, the work doesn't need to be done by the dealer - you can even do it yourself. simply keep records of the work done, the mileages at which it was done, and keep receipts. if you change the oil yourself for instance, keep receipts for its purchase and make a note in the service schedule accordingly.

the warranty booklet kinda sorta dances the tightrope of saying the work should be done by the dealer, without actually saying it in a way that breaks the law, the law being that warranty /is/ legally maintained if the schedule is properly observed. there are benefits of having the work done by the dealer of course, but economy isn't one of them, and in the case of san francisco honda [for example], they'll try and rip you for spectacular amounts of unnecessary work.
to the average driver, the cost benefit of taking an evening course in basic car tech, is HUGE. even if they never intend to pick up a wrench ever again, they can thereafter walk into a shop and have some knowledge of what's going on and often avoid substantial expense because of it.
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The latest cars do not have service schedules listed in their Owner's Manuals. You are supposed to go entirely by the dashboard's Maintenance Minder.
The Warranty booklet will list the required mileage/time-based warranty services that are to be performed.

This is very important, especially if you do the work yourself.
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Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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I am a Service Advisor in a Honda dealership..We advise on the newer vehicles to watch your oil life...at 15% you should call for a Service appointment.This is by American Honda Standards.There are two schedules for maintence for Honda Vehicles one for the older and one for the newer vehicles..if you dont put a lot of miles on a new vehicle an oil change should be done in at least 6 months..The older 3 months or 3,000 miles...We don't want to make any extra money off of you , we make our money off of people who DON'T take care of their cars.
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On May 17, 10:50 pm, Dancing snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Marcia M) wrote:

The little wrench in my Odyssey lit up the other day, when the oil life indicator turned to 15%, so you're right on, Marcia! Time for the oil change, I guess.....
Dan D '07 Ody EX Central NJ USA
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Correct. In fact, your manual specifically advises you to NOT change your oil early, for your first oil change.
You'll get service reminders all the time. Just ignore them until your vehicle tells you it needs service.
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or a synthetic mix in. me thinks no point to change the oil filter though.

wow. i'm glad i'm not buying a used honda not that i'd want a toaster on wheels with a slushbox anyway :^)
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Wow, are you out of date! Slushboxes were contemporary to the Beatniks and maybe Hippies. Although the term "slushbox" has been applied wrongly to automatic transmissions since I was a kid, it actually only fit the ancient Buick Dynaflow... although the 2-speed GM Powerglide came close in operation. Conceited stick jockies have used it to carelessly or mindlessly denigrate the entire gamut of automatic transmissions, good, bad and ugly, ever since. Modern automatic transmissions are mostly very much the same as modern manual transmissions but with controls (including lock-up torque converters) built in.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

My second car was a 1950 Buick Roadmaster. To increase fuel mileage, one would start in low then shift into drive. Gotya about 11 instead of the typical 10 mpg.
Even though, I love that biiiiiiig car! Wish I still had it..
JT
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single speed. A sister-in-law had some lesser Buick with a Dynaflow (aka Fluid Drive) when she and my brother first met. Doug said stepping on the gas would cause the engine to roar to life, as the car started moving slowly forward. Not the sort of transmission to mate with a small engine! Roadmasters were supposed to be quite the ride, though. IIRC they had enough power to make the Dynaflow useful.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

Yup... A huge overhead valve straight eight!
You could see the gas gauge go down as so did the gas pedal...
<G>
JT
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wrote:

I have a 1950 Roadmaster right now!
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snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM wrote:

Four door? Black?? Maybe it's the same one...
<G>
JT
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wrote:

really??? I thought DSG is only found on certain VWs and even those are far in between. Are you referring to the DSG clone in the upcoming evo? That car hasn't even been released to reviewers let alone the driving public yet. Would you please be specific which technological marvels you are referring to? found in which cars, specifically? we're not marketing here and don't like things to me left to imagination
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that gave rise to the term - was a fluid coupled torque converter with a manual granny underdrive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynaflow ); thus "slushbox" to denote the coupling didn't involve gears. If you know of things today that uses such an arrangement, please enlighten me. Even manual trannies are lubricated, so having liquid in the gearbox isn't the issue. Almost anything built in the last decade uses a lockup torque converter so fluid coupling isn't normally going on there - the torque converter is mostly a clutch.
Then there was Renault's powdered iron magnetic clutch on the electrically shifted manual tranny to make it fully automatic, back in the '60s... as dry as any manual tranny :-)
Mike
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