Re: 1986 Honda Accord LXI, FI 2.0



So then, what we are talking about is a breach of the head gasket somewhere in the area of the #1 cylinder, most likely on the timing belt side, because # 2 cylinder is showing perfect pressure.
I have to tell you also that someone recently bought an s10 from me. Within a couple days they came crying foul that the heater core was bad and that coolant was spewing into the cab. The vehicle was sitting at my mechanic's shop and he had not personally seen the leak. I went over, started up the truck and sat there with the heat on high for 45 minutes. It never offered to leak, spew or dribble. The radiator and overflow were full. I called the buyer on it and he just stammered all over himself and said the mechanic must have fixed it. The mechanic had not. It is still not leaking.
So the possibility exists that this rat was trying to visit some kind of prank on me. He was trying to get money back that he spent on the truck, I know that much.
SO, yes, it could well be the head gasket. However, as Michael said, it would have been fouled antifreeze from the exhaust system. Wouldn't the problem also continue and not be a one time thing coincidentally the day after my run in with this hoodlum? The exhaust also does not blow steam, wouldn't that be concurrent with an antifreeze leak through the engine? Wouldn't I also lose antifreeze, I mean wouldn't my levels go down?
Elle I believe in logic as well. But I believe there are two threads here. Regardless, if I do a head gasket and new rings, won't the problem be resolved so long as the head is not warped? I have put together all of the parts for less than 80 bucks from various sources. Good brand name stuff that was sitting in the right places.
Until then, I am going to drive it and see what else it does and I guess I will call the cops if I catch someone on my property. Either that or let my hound dog lick them to death. Vicious beast that one.
Peace! Jack
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On the subject of a hoodlum messing with this Accord:
Jack, what exactly is the mechanism you are proposing said hoodlum used? I am trying to picture this. Turkey baster filled with anti-freeze dumped into exhaust pipe? Maybe I am just naive about the tricks du jour to play on people's cars. Michael? Did said hoodlum even know about this Accord's problem and that you were troubleshooting it? The theory seems a little far-fetched to me so far, but I can't rule it out based on what you wrote. I am not ruling anything out; just going with what I would most keep an eye peeled for. Namely, a head gasket failure.
You're looking at the antifreeze in the reservoir and comparing it to what blew out, right? I am not so sure they would match in color and consistency.
As for not consistently blowing steam, it may be intermittent depending on operating conditions.
While you are driving this sad little Accord around, monitor that reservoir level. Goes high = exhaust gases dumping into the cooling system. Goes low = blowing out tail pipe. As I am sure you know.
It is possible the breach is in the block but I would expect, based strictly on anecdotal reports, that the breach is indeed the head gasket. Plenty change their head gaskets, but like you say, watch out for warpage. Plenty also have their engine head machined as a part of the gasket change.
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I could only speculate how clean antifreeze would appear at the tailpipe, but I'm having trouble figuring how it would get there from the engine. If it's a fault in the head gasket at the #1 cylinder, the coolant could certainly find itself into the combustion chamber there. If it does it when the engine is running, we know that cylinder isn't firing (the injector has been disabled) and it could certainly be pumped into the exhaust manifold. There things get sticky. The other cylinders are firing, and glycol is flammable. I've seen only a couple of seriously bad head gaskets, and although the exhaust billows clouds of sweet smelling steam I don't recall that they dripped antifreeze. If the coolant leaked into the cylinder aftert shutdown it would wind up in the oil instead of the exhaust, since we are assuming at this point the rings are not sealing well. Any coolant from the engine would certainly be loaded with soot from the exhaust system, and it doesn't sound like that is the case.
It could still be a bad head gasket, but I'm not convinced. If Jack hadn't looked at the tailpipe we would have no other indications, which strikes me as odd.
Mike
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Actually, the hoodlum in question did know about troubleshooting the accord. He is always at my mechanic's place. He hangs around and does get into a lot of trouble. He was recently caught skeet shooting in the parking lot of his brother in law's business. During the day when all the workers were there. He wasn't even drunk. He really is not screwed together too tight.
#1. I am comparing the fluid that dripped from the tailpipe with that in the radiator itself. Copper/Brown, which is the same color as what is in the overflow bottle. The bright green stuff didn't show until I backed down the driveway and changed the angle of the tailpipe by doing so. On the carport the tailpipe is a smidge higher than the muffler. Backing off of the carport the car drops down to a 25 degree slope. It was at that point we noticed a puddle right where the tailpipe had been because the headlights illuminated it. I got out to inspect and it was bright green antifreeze. Again, how could it be bright green if what's up front is brown? With the combustion involved in the engine and the heat through the exhaust manifold it would certainly not refine it back into brand new quality. #2. I still haven't ruled out the blown head gasket. Because there is a lack of pressure. However, I did plug the injector back in because the car would not run right at all. I forgot to mention that back several posts. Over 40 mph or so the car would have a very hard and palpable miss with the injector unplugged. With the injector plugged in, the car drives well at high speed. #3. No soapy bubbles in the oil. It still hasn't come back out of the tail pipe again. It's 13 degrees here right now. If getting from 13 to operating temperature does not induce some kind of change in shape or pressure, I am not sure what would.
So, these are the things that are consistent: The cylinder appears dead at idle, but at higher speeds the car does not drive well with that injector unplugged. At this point I am pulling the plug after almost every shutdown. It has a small amount of carbon around the end of the thread head, but the point looks to be burning and is dry. It is not covered with gas. I haven't checked the cylinder pressure again, but last time a wet test showed 120# of pressure. Another good thing is that everytime I get into the car it starts right up. At least that's something.
I'm thinking I will make observations for a week or so on fluid levels and performance and see what I find.
Peace and Pleasant Greetings without any obligation to return, accept or believe in whatever. Jack
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