Re: NEVER BUY WALMART'S BATTERIES OR YOU WILL BE SORRY

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You are full of crap. Tell me about some other store where they let you return a battery.
Your dribble about voltage is equally ridiculous. There are only about 3-4 companies in the US that make batteries, and Wal-Mart gets theirs the same place as many other retailers.
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I have always gotten my batteries at Walmart and they have all lasted me in each vehicle I have owned. Tom is an idiot.
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Costco
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Good thing I still have my Costco membership, I may have to renew it though since my batteries are still new ,1 1/2 years together with the car. I really haven't paid attention to the batteries in Costco. Are they Kirkland batteries or good brands? Are they like in the tire center and they will install the battery for you and test them?
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They are Kirkland signature, but that just means they are made by some other battery makers. I've used a couple in my vehicles, never had a problem, never owen the car long enough for one to fail. People used to say that their Alkaline batteries were no good, but they are just relabeled Duracell (Consumer Reports). In my experience the kirkland brands are pretty good quality.
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Consumer reports again? ehehe. I had returned 2 kirkland products. Shampoo and dish washing liquid. The dish washing liquid label says lemon fresh scent, but it actually smells like stinky feet. I like the vitamins and other products, never tried batteries yet, hopefully when that time comes I'll buy one from them.
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have my issues with Consumer Reports also, but battery testing is pretty straight forward, plus they revealed that the AA Kirkland signature batteries are the same as the Duracells they sell for 4 times the price, and there test also showed that all alkaline batteries are essentially the same, no matter what the label, so you may as well just buy the cheapest.
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Stinky foot scented soap can't be good :) We buy there soap products all the time, and never noted any problems, but now I'll have to smell it first!

I have my issues with Consumer Reports also, but battery testing is pretty straight forward, plus they revealed that the AA Kirkland signature batteries are the same as the Duracells they sell for 4 times the price, and there test also showed that all alkaline batteries are essentially the same, no matter what the label, so you may as well just buy the cheapest.
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wrote:

At the Costcos that I have been to here in SoCal, the batteries are on racks with the other auto related merchandise. You find the right one, put it in your cart, and take it home. I am pretty sure there is a guide hanging there so you can look up the right battery for your vehicle, but that's about it. Thing is, after you take it home and install it, you have to figure out a way to get rid of the old one. I had my old one in the garage for a couple of years before I was able to properly get rid of it at a community hazardous waste collection event.
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wrote:

That's enough - but go over to the Groceries side and buy two or three 10# bags of Baking Soda, and a box of the rubber gloves over by the Pharmacy. Chemical Splash goggles and a 2" "Chip" disposable paintbrush you'll have to get elsewhere.
The Baking Soda serves double duty. You'll use maybe a quarter pound of it to make a water-soda paste for cleaning out the small residue of escaped acid from the battery tray and surrounding area - and the rest of the open bag (and the spare) is kept right there (along with a charged garden hose) ready for emergency sulphuric acid neutralization in case you drop and break the battery, or make a spark at the wrong time and blow the top off.
If something goes very wrong you need a large quantity of baking soda and running water on hand Right Now, no running back for it. Delay could cost your eyesight.
If it's kept in a sealed bag it doesn't go bad, at least for acid neutralization. Might not want to use an old bag for odor reduction in the fridge, or the lettuce will smell like axle grease...

Scrub off the outside with some more baking soda paste (so you don't wreck your trunk carpet), toss it in the trunk on top of a trash bag, and take it back to Costco. They have a pallet for collecting old batteries in the Tire Service area, when the truck drops off a load of new batteries they send the dead ones back for recycling.
--<< Bruce >>--
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<excellent, detailed safety info snipped>

It's good to know that you can at least take the old battery back to them on your next Costco visit.
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There are a lot of people burning old batteries to recover the lead, selling at about $1.80 @ Lbs now. A friend has a tire shop in the Sacramento Valley and is getting calls from foreign-sounding people representing themselves as school charity fundraisers looking for old tire weights and batteries. He is going to set some up for a date with the Sheriff. it isn't worth it for me to try and recover the lead in the 6 or so dead batteries I have here, they will get dropped off at a local parts store for proper recycling.
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wrote:

Actually, those fly-by-night 'recyclers' deserve an introduction to local law enforcement, because I'll guarantee any DIY efforts to recover the lead are going to break a few dozen environmental laws - Just for openers, what are they going to do with all the battery acid? Dump it down the sewer? Or the storm drains? Or just on the ground?
And if they burn them, they're going to let loose a ton of polyethylene particulates and acidic gases and lead vapors, and that is NOT going to be a good thing to live downwind from.
That kind of stuff is how Superfund Sites are born - make a quick buck and leave all the cleanup costs to government. Love Canal...
--<< Bruce >>--
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Don't forget the silver hazmat suit with the little window in the front of the hood, and a Geiger counter. (What the hell's a "Geiger," anyway?)
Oh, and that symbol of neurotic risk-aversion, a bicycle helmet. Get an extra-large one, so that it'll fit over the hood of the hazmat suit. Andf maybe a reflective vest in DayGlo orange or lime yellow. You can't be too careful, you know.

Jesus, are you talking about cleaning off a battery, or fueling a Messerschmitt Me-163 Komet rocket fighter? You forgot to mention calling the local public-safety authorities and having the three- block radius around his house evacuated before he begins.
Look: just hose down the battery, and the tray after you've removed the battery, and sprinkle some baking soda onto it right from the box; no need to make a paste. Then when the fizzing stops, hose off the areas where you'd sprinkled the baking soda. Piece of cake. Forget the goggles; just use c*mm*n s*ns* and don;t stick your face over the engine bay when you're spraying water. The same 1-lb. box of Arm & Hammer ought to be good for 2-3 battery replacements.

"Borrow" a plastic milk crate from behind a supermarket or Sebm-Lebm, and put the battery (wrapped in the aforementioned garbage bag) into that, to prevent it's falling over when you go around a corner. I always preferred to carry them in the front passenger footwell instead if in the trunk, so I could keep an eye on them, and grab the battery if necessary.

Or wait until after nightfall, and drop the old battery down a storm drain. The city public-works workers will eventually take care of it for you.
Geoff "No Dumping - Flows To Bay" Miller
-- "If it rains after a liberal washes his car, they say it's a right-wing dirty trick." -- Ann Coulter
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"Geoff Miller" ...

*snip*
Are you saying people shouldn't wear bike helmets? I mean, while riding a bike, of course. Or are you saying neurotic people wear them even while walking? (jokingly, one assumes)
If it's the former, you should work in a hospital emergency department over a weekend.
That'll settle anyone's thinking when it comes to head gear with using two-wheeled vehicles.
Natalie, nurse for 31 years
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DINGDINGDINGDINGDING! "We have a WINNAH!"
It's heresy, I know. Bear with me.

You know, when I was a kid in the Sixties and Seventies, no one wore a helmet when riding a bicycle. Ever. I mean, it never even crossed our minds. Why, we had no idea that we were in mortal peril! And back then kids rode bicycles a hell of a lot more than they do today: to and from school, to friends' houses, to the movies or the bowling alley or the hobby shop, just around town, etc.
There were no Nintendo potatoes, and consequently, there was no obesity crisis. Each grade at every school had but a token fat kid. The exposure to bicycle-related head injuries, both indi- vidual and collective, was far greater than it is today.
And yet, nobody worried. We never heard of anyone bonking his head while riding a bicycle. Oh, I'd never insist that it didn't happen. The odds being what they were with that many bicycle kid- miles being ridden every year, it had to have happened once in a while. But it was a fluke, and understood to be. It was rare enough that nobody ever heard about it. The possibility never joined "You'll break your neck!" and "You'll put your eye out!" (with or without a Daisy Red Rider BB gun) in the hysterical repertoire of even the most neurotic mother.
I lived in five different towns as a child, and not only did I not know anyone who suffered a head injury due to falling off of a bicycle, I never even *heard* of anyone who had. It stands to reason that if bicycle-related head injuries were at all common, such an incident would've been part of the local kid-lore in at least one or two of those places ("Billy's brains ran out of his head onto the blacktop! It was cool!"). But there was nary a story.
(Okay, I'll concede that once time circa 1969, I saw a kid fall off his Schwinn Sting Ray and do a faceplant onto the street. But a helmet wouldn't have helped there. And besides, he was an asshole.)
What changed? Thanks to the advent of the Culture Of Fear and a concomitant culture of risk aversion at all costs, the threshold of acceptable risk plummeted. People have lost the ability to distinguish between the probable and the merely possible. Anything that's possible is perceived to be likely, and therefore, as something that must be proactively guarded against. So now we have bicycle helmets, head restraints, the TSA, airbags, cops at schools, "stranger danger," and a child molester behind every tree.
You know? I'm glad I was a kid back then and not today. And no, I still don't wear a helmet when I ride my bike.

Then you should understand as well as anyone that since your hospital serves a wide area, the people you see with bicycle-related head injuries are a tiny subset of a vastly larger bicycle-riding population, most of whom escape without even an owie.
Geoff
-- "If it rains after a liberal washes his car, they say it's a right-wing dirty trick." -- Ann Coulter
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"Geoff Miller" ...

Oh dear.

Okayyyyyy...
But I'm betting you didn't have cars and other vehicles driving wildly, everywhere you went. Whole new world out there now.

Right with ya on kids not getting out enough.

With bike helmets, you don't necessarily have a high chance of serious injury, but if you're going to protect any part of your body while on a bike, the head is the one to protect. Arm and leg pads are a bit of a joke, however.

I wish I could say the same, but the fact of the matter is that streets are way more dangerous now. Rules have changed.

LOL so that made it okay?

I disagree about restraints and helmets - I've just seen too much good done with them.

Then ride the short bus. :-P

Troo dat, but would you want to be that one in however many thousand, whose head lands juuusst the wrong way?
Not me
Natalie
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 00:00:29 -0400, "Wickeddoll"

That is true. Folks now drive like anything that prevents them from getting to the next light a split-second sooner is a major problem.
The solution is to stop calling things accidents. If people who are driving when someone is hurt or killed is charged with a serious crime, such as assault or murder, I suspect things might change.
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--
"dgk" writ

> That is true. Folks now drive like anything that prevents them from
  Click to see the full signature.
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About 8 years ago, in one of the counties south of here (Rochester), some drunk bitch got onto route 390 in the wrong direction, slammed into another car and killed both occupants. The district attorney charged her with murder. Logic: After so many years of seeing public service ads about drunk driving, he felt she knew the risks, so when she got in the car, she had intent. The plan sort of worked: The woman ended up bargaining for the worst possible sentence for vehicular manslaughter, whatever it was at the time. She's gone for a LOT of years.
In an interview with the DA later, he said he wanted to be sure she didn't bargain downward from 10 years to 2, or any other number that would be an insult to the justice system. The murder charge began the bargaining with a much higher number. But the jury was apparently OK with the original murder charge.
I'd like to see this happen much more often.
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