Rear brake shoes in 2001 Odyssey

Hello,
Our car has 40K miles (pretty low) and lots of that has been highway. I am hearing a metal scraping sound that goes away after the car is driven for 10
minutes. The front disc brake pads are about 8 months old - and the sound is obviously coming from the back wheels.
Is it possible that these shoes could be worn out at 40K miles? Does Honda have them make a warning scrape when it's almost time?
Thanks, Be
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BE wrote:

Very possible. The rear brake pads on my '03 Accord wore out before the fronts and before 40k miles. I don't think there are any special low pad warning devices built into the rear pads.
John
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"Scraping"? Take it in immediately before you wreck your rotors (if they're not already gone). OEM rotors are $70 each.

You sure you've got SHOES, and not PADS? Shoes are for drum brakes. My neighbor's '02 has discs in the rear.
Rear discs require frequent servicing or they will wear prematurely. If you've neglected them, one pad (or the sliders) will get seized, and one of the pads will wear out tout suite.
Also, rear discs that incorporate a parking brake tend to wear out much more quickly than those that do not incorporate a parking brake.
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TeGGeR

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Yes, they are shoes. On the 2001 Odyssey LX (not the more expensive EX), the factory equipment was drum brakes in rear, disc in front. The EX had disc brakes on all four wheels. Quite possibly they stopped using drums the very next year, but I'm not sure.
I am taking the car in this afternoon.
Be
On 4/4/06 3:21 AM, in article Xns979B2C549EA63tegger@207.14.113.17,

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BTW, the rear wheels don't have "rotors" - they are drums, at least they are on an '01 LX.
I had the brakes checked - the Honda technician said they were barely worn and should make it to 100K miles before needing replacement. He said the noise is coming from two places:
1) the rear shoes need alignment (?) and this is an every-7500 mile routine maintenance item (true???)
2) the front pads, which are NOT honda product... These were replaced last summer and were AutoZone's best replacement pads. I installed them myself, with anti-squeak compound and careful cleaning of the caliper components.
The service tech claims that these pads can damage Honda's disc rotors. My engineer father thinks that if that's the case, it would only be because Honda and other car makers started issuing rotors in softer metal in recent years to deal with customer complaints about squeaky brakes. (How brilliant is that??? Compromise the most important component to create a temporary fix, then get lots more repair business replacing rotors that get skinned by better quality brake pads)...
I don't hear this sound coming from the front, however. The acoustics, to my ear, have it coming from the rear.
Well, at least I have time to deal with this - there is no urgent brake job right now.
Comments anyone?
Be
On 4/4/06 3:21 AM, in article Xns979B2C549EA63tegger@207.14.113.17,

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Maybe. But the only regular adjustment I know of is the one that pushes the shoes closer to the drums. AFAIK, this operation should automatically be performed whenever you step on the brake pedal.
Anybody else know differently?

Not true. The problem with aftermarket pads is that they tend to be too hard, and possessed of the wrong friction characteristics for the rest of the system. They also contain ingredients that can lead to excessive rusting and grinding noises.
Honda (and all other maufacturers) have to strike a balance between cost, longevity, noise, feel, stopping distance, driving style, corrosion, and service intervals. The result is the brakes that left the factory.
Keep in mind as well that asbestos is no longer used for brake friction materials. I've been told it was easier to deal with noise with asbestos friction linings than with the newer non-asbestos ones.
If you want longer brake life, and wish to achieve this with harder pads, you also need to install rotors with appropriate metallurgy. Aftermarket rotors are NOT noted for high quality, and will probably perform even worse than the OEM ones.
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TeGGeR wrote:

Hmmm, the Brembos I put on my '03 Accord at least hold themselves flat, unlike the factory rotors which wanted to make themselves into potato chips.
Not all aftermarket rotors are created equal. I would certainly stay away from the bargain brands.
John
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BE wrote:

BS detector going off very loudly here. I have seen rear brakes get noisy due to a build up of brake dust inside the drums. One of the many ways disc brakes are superior is that with discs the dust mostly migrates onto the alloy wheels while with drums much gets caught inside :). There are no alignment adjustments on modern drum brakes. If the self adjusters are working correctly the brakes shoes should stay in proper adjustment all by themselves. That said, pulling the drums once a year and cleaning the junk out often helps!

More BS. Dealer techs like to blame aftermarket parts as a matter of policy, even when there is no good reason for it. Certainly there are some junk bargain priced parts out there, but I doubt that this is the case on your car.
On my Accord the dealer techs insisted that the rattle I was hearing from the trunk was because I had aftermarket speakers in the rear deck. I finally figured out that the problem was the torsion bar springs for the rear trunk lid rattling on each other. I fixed it by slitting some vinyl tubing and slipping the tubing over each bar. Rattle has been 100% gone for over a year now with my fix.
The original rotors on my Accord warped at about 15,000 miles. I had been religious about proper wheel torque, etc. Dealer said tough luck. So, first I pulled the rotors and had a machine shop turn them. Within a week they warped again. Next I bought a pair of aftermarket Brembo rotors and installed them. Now over 10,000 miles later the brakes still work like a dream without a hint of vibration.
The point is, you cannot believe everything a technician, parts guy, service writer, etc. tells you. Each has their own biases and agenda and often the stuff they say simply isn't correct.
John
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BE wrote:

are you sure these are honda oem brake shoes? did you buy this vehicle new? i've had similar experiences a number of times with after-market rear shoes, and each time they've been permanently fixed by using honda oem shoes. i suggest you do the same. particularly as they're so cheap and offer so much more beneficial anti-fade characteristics.

unlikely.
front disk pads, yes, but not for rear shoes.

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Clarification: Honda puts a SQUEAL tab on the inner _disc_ brake pads only. The drums have no such feature.
No brake I know of utters a "scrape" noise unless they are already down to the steel backing, or there is lots of rust.
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Yes, the shoes on the rear wheels are factory-original. I am the only owner of this van.
Be
On 4/4/06 10:13 PM, in article hd6dne1vNJ5JqK7ZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@speakeasy.net, "jim beam"

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making noise. Upon inspection, the shoes looked brand new. It seems the drums got glazed over and when the shoe hit the drum it made the noise.
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On 4/5/06 6:45 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.com,

drums, for example, and thoroughly clean them wiith brake parts cleaner, would that take care of whatever is stuck to them?
Be
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