Replacing radiator in 97 Accord (any tips)

I have a leak in my radiator on my 97 Accord with 165K. I have done other repairs on my car and I am considering attempting this on my own. Especially when my dealer want $500 installed.
I have looked at my Honda service manual and it seems straight forward. Basically: Drain coolant. Remove all hoses connected to radiator. Remove all fan harnesses. Remove radiator mounts. Remove radiator with fans attached. Remove fans from radiator and install on new radiator. Install in reverse order.
* Can anyone recommend an aftermarket radiator that installed easily into a 94-97 Accord? * To anyone who has done this type of repair and run into any type of complications, any additional tips would be helpfull. * One thing I would like to do is find a way to keep the transmission fluid from leaking out of the hose once I remove it from the radiator. I also plan to protect the fins with a piece of cardboard when installing the new radiator.
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My son did most of the work on my daughter's '93 Accord LX recently, and he ended up with a two day job of it. Access to the bottom was the big problem - scout it out before setting your schedule. This one had a plastic splash shield - no big deal - but there is also a cross-member on this one that runs across right about where you need to get at the hoses. He removed the cross-member, which also required separating the ball joints.... I think it can be done without removing the cross-member as long as you have the patience.
If you can deal with the lower access, the next challenge is getting the fans out. Easy, actually, except for the connectors. The trick with those was to get a medium size blade screwdriver that could simultaneously depress the tab and lever the connector apart a bit. I imagine a squirt with silicone lubricant into the gap where the two halves mate before trying to get them apart would help.
Once you get everything out of the way the radiator part is an anticlimax. I recommend new radiator hoses - a small price to pay for what probably needs replacing anyway. New clamps, of course, unless you really like those OEM thingies. Reassembly is easier than disassembly - you know the tricks and nothing fights much.
Mike
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I forgot to mention - in the '93 the radiator didn't have clearance to come out with fans attached... you may be in luck!
To control the AT fluid leak you can put bolts in the hoses.
Mike
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news:hNOdnbi4iq-

In most cases you will lose very little tranny fluid. You can check it and top it up after the job just to be on the safe side.
Now, you know that Hondas require tranny service according to schedule. Some models apparently have no filters, and if you want the tranny to survive, you must service it.
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Once you finish the job, run the engine on idle for about 20 minutes with a gallon of water in your hand. Leave the cap off of the radiator. If the level goes down, pour water into it. Keep doing this until the level remains at the top for 10 minutes. This is the technique that I learned from a mechanic to purge the air out of the system. Also, check the water level in the radiator every morning for at least a week before you start your car. If it remains at the top for three days in row--that means all of air has been purged from the system. Perhaps other people might offer other tips related to this issue. I hope that I did not leave out any steps. Make sure you have 50% water and 50% radiator fluid.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

id have no hesitations. especially if it was a 5psd with no AC.

you can get the part for half that.

cork? piece of bread?

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I've used the fingers cut off from a latex glove for capping off hoses and things. Roll the base of the finger up to form a bead. Only works if the hose is a certain diameter, though.
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    Remove the lower hose from the ENGINE end. It's lots easier than trying to get to the rad end. Just move it to the new radiator in the same orientation, and clamp it tight.     Check the trans cooler line (steel) in front of the rad for rust. They will leak out there after some time. bob
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With the new hoses in hand and a visual sanity check done, my son just cut the lower hose in two with a knife. The Gordian Knot method ;-) But thinking about it, that may have made the cross-member thing unimportant if the lower fan bolts were accessible.
Mike
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You know.....my 95 civic had a hole in one of the main lines of the radiator...it was spewing out fluid like CRAZY! Couldn't drive for more than 2 miles without overheating. Plugged hole with TOOTHPICKS! Once they break off, cover area with electrical tape....saved me 50 bucks for a replacement radiator.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You can also do an emergency repair with household pepper.
Had a relative visiting just after the start of a long touring holiday. Developed a hole among the fins (don't ask) and put a handful of pepper in the radiator. Put the lid on and ran the motor.
Not too sure of the chemistry on this but I am told it's something about the pepper circulating in the hot water, when it hits the cold air as it exits the leak turns to a solid lump and seals the leak.
Anyway he went on the rest of his holiday and 6 months later he still hadn't done anything to fix it. (it was not a modern car)
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Just looked at radiator barn site and they have 2 options, 1 has a plastic tank with aluminum core and the other brass tank with copper core - the aluminum plastic is slightly more money - which is better.
A couple of things - had a local garage change my 97 accord's radiator last summer. They used Bumper to Bumper - first 2 radiators had holes - #3 was lucky - no holes Hecho in Mexico. Watched the tech - some of the hoses were a real PITA to get off. Also he did not reconnect the AC and it did not work - figured that out. ALso the garage manager stole one of my maps - clean out your vehicle - took everything else out - how did know the AH manager was going on a trip to Chi that day - that is the map he took - crooks abound.
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| change my 97 accord's radiator What happened to your original radiator ? My '90 ( Toyo 60300, Japan made ) radiator is still fine : no rust / crack ( incl cap's rubber seals ), though by 75000 km [i] its Mitsuba fan motor's bearing already had no oil left [ii] 1 bolt @ bottom of fan motor's casing had rusted & jammed.
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I'll hazard a guess... the Great Psychic sees a crack running from left to right (or is it right to left... the vision is hazy) across the middle of the flat spot on the top of the radiator where a support crosses on the passenger side.
Anyway, that's what it was on my daughter's '93. Apparently that flat area flexes as the radiator pressure builds and deflates, until it finally cracks. Maybe the '97 doesn't have that spot.
Mike
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My 97 sprung a leak/crack from right to left or vice versa across the top where the top connects to the fins.
When buying radiators - beware of Hecho In Mexico - took 3 tries to get one that did not leak.
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* Can anyone recommend an aftermarket radiator that installed easily into a 94-97 Accord?
Buy a brand called Koyo. Very high quality at a reasonable price. Practically indistinguishable from the factory, and a perfect drop in fit. Only difference might be filler neck size requiring a different cap. Howard

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