Screeching windows

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I've tried several different libricant sprays in the window channels (tracks) to prevent the ear-splitting screeching when they are lowered or raised by the servo, but most don't cure the problem for more than a
day or two. Does anybody know something better?
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The ONLY lubricant you should be using is silicone spray. And you need to make sure you get the spray right down inside the run-channel inside the door, both front and rear.
If you've been using petroleum-based sprays, you've probably damamged the run-channel rubber.
--
Tegger

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On 5/14/2012 7:53 PM, Tegger wrote:

No, no, I only used silicone based sprays, both with and without graphite in it, just as you suggest, but the effect is pretty short-lived. I was wondering if there was something new out there that's better.
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On 05/14/2012 10:25 PM, cameo wrote:

did the window ever break and was it replaced? if so, there's probably still broken glass fragments in the channel somewhere. if not, then look at the winder mechanism.
--
nomina rutrum rutrum

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On 5/15/2012 7:08 AM, jim beam wrote:

No, the windows were never broken. What is interesting though that the passenger side window tends to screech more than the driver side, even though that one is rolled down less often. But then, the right rear window is rolled even less, yet that is quiet. But that could also be because it cannot be rolled down as far as the front window. Maybe I'll just search for some newer silicone based sprays that work longer.
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How much are you spraying in there? I've found you really need to load it on all around, to the point where it's running out and makes a mess on the windows and you need to wipe it off. Especially you need to make sure the parts inside the door are soaking wet with the silicone.
Give it a good soaking and see if that helps.
--
Tegger

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On 5/15/2012 1:16 PM, Tegger wrote:

Well, I'm going to give it another try though I have to be careful not to drop the thin plastic spray straw (tub) into the run channel because it cannot be inserted firmly enough into the spray head. If this will not work I would like to try to use some kind of grease. I wonder if lithium paste would be good for that.
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No lithium grease! Only silicone spray. Lithium will damage the rubber the channels are made of.
What you need is a really runny, slippery liquid combined with the force of an aerosol. That's silicone spray.
If the tube won't stay put (a distressingly common problem), hold the tube with one hand while pushing the nozzle with the other.
If you're really stuck, get a garage to do it for you. It only takes a few minutes.
--
Tegger

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On 5/16/2012 6:24 AM, Tegger wrote:

OK, no lithium then but those channels are not really from rubber but neoprene, right? At least that's how it looks to me and after so many years rubber would have dried out and became brittle in any case.

Actually that's how I was doing it but it's not very convenient.

First I want to exhaust all I could do myself. I think I also stop by the Honda dealer and ask from their Parts guy what they have for that.
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On 05/16/2012 11:03 AM, cameo wrote:

"neoprene" and "rubber" are both generics for literally hundreds of different polymers. unless one is being much more specific, you simply can't draw any such distinction.

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On 05/16/2012 12:41 AM, cameo wrote:

a lot of the so-called "silicone" spray lubes are just a very small percentage - the rest is ordinary petroleum distillate, and that's not good for rubber. same for greases. if you want the real deal, you've gotta pay. dow "33" is the real deal in the grease dept. and honda have a special "door rubber" grease, also very expensive.
but before you monkey about with lotions and potions, figure out where the noise is really coming from. the window level mechanism is full of levers, rollers, cables and hinges, all of which can squeak if not originally lubricated sufficiently.
--
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On 5/16/2012 9:29 AM, jim beam wrote:

Which is why it might make sense to pop off the door panel and inspect, clean, and lube from the bottom up instead of the top down. Access is lousy, but with flashlights, mirrors and an assortment of long handled brushes you should be able to fix it. If you are careful you will only have minor lacerations on your hands and a twisted back.
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On 5/16/2012 6:53 AM, Al wrote:

I just stopped by the nearby Honda dealer and the Parts guys pretty much suggested the same thing with the explanation that accummulated dirt in the tracks causes the unpleasant noise and using spray, though may help in the short run, just attracts more dirt in the long run. According to them, thorough cleaning or replacement of the rubber tracks is the only long term solution. He also suggested to try cleaning the inside of those tracks as far down as I can without removing the door panel and see if that works. If not, removing the panel and do a thorough cleaning that way, should.
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That's a good idea, but difficult to do. The channel goes down below the door sill about as far as it goes above it, and it's just about impossible to get anything other than silicone spray deep into the run channel unless you first remove the window glass.

And that's what Honda tells their dealers too. But again, that's a lot of work. I've found that a good soaking with silicone spray does the trick more often than not.
--
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On 05/16/2012 04:17 PM, cameo wrote:

depending on the age of vehicle, it's usually pretty easy to pull the rubber out with the glass in place, and slide it back also. wind the window all the way to the bottom, pull the rubber out of the channel at the top, then the sides, and then pull up so it slides in the slot. that way, it'll come all the way out. reinsertion is a reverse, sometimes with a little assistance of moving the glass up and down. i've done that to multiple civics, my accord and my toyota truck.
--
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On 5/16/2012 8:05 PM, jim beam wrote:

Whoa, that's something to see!
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On 05/17/2012 01:07 AM, cameo wrote:

go to a junk yard and try it out on another car. i'm not saying it works on every vehicle on the planet, but it's worked on mine.
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On 5/17/2012 7:40 AM, jim beam wrote:

I'm not saying it could not work, just that I see some risk in not being able to push it back after cleaning and greasing. Then I would have to be ready to remove the door panel.
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On 05/17/2012 11:55 AM, cameo wrote:

of course you do if you've not done it before, but this is precisely why i said, go to a junkyard and check it out. that way there's nothing untoward to your vehicle and you get to fully assess the possibilities.

again, the secret is to pull it out at the top, then slide it out from the sides. it goes back in exactly how it came out.
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On 5/16/2012 6:29 AM, jim beam wrote:

Yes, that's what I came to sense, too, though I hope I have not damaged neoprene with it.

Well, I'll find out just how expensive it is. Maybe it is because they carry it only in shop-size containers?

I think the fact that prior sprays of the run channels temporarily stopped the squeaking is a pretty strong evidence that the source is indeed the rubber or neoprene run channels.
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