Seized stripped screw

My car's distributor rotor (94 civic, see earlier post today :) ) is held in place with a a seized up philips head screw that is starting to get stripped. It doesn't look like a bolt, unlike the combo screw/bolts that
hold in the distributor cap. Anyone have a smart strategy for getting old corroded screws out?
(Can't believe I'm asking this question, oh well...)
Thanks.
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hutchtoo wrote:

The screws are usually a small allen socket, not a philips. However, yours may have been replaced with a non-stock unit. Are you indeed sure that it's a philips and not an allen?
If it is a philips, then make sure that you're using an anti-camout driver such as one of these http://tinyurl.com/aukm8 (the right size of course).
Eric
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the allen heads haven't been used for years! break the rotor and the get a vise grips on it to break it loose, or i've used an impact driver also Chip
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Well that's one way to take control of the situation!
I just have to laugh, seems in these projects I spend 50% of my time dealing with seized up screws and inaccessible bolts. :P
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hutchtoo wrote:

=========================== Did you try the pedal-to-the-metal method to see if the Owner's Manual is right? Those screws can be a real bear. (it won't smell flooded, the way carbureted cars do).
'Curly'
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I did try that, and flooding did not seem to be the problem but thanks for the suggestion.

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It's a tough one! You may have no choice but to remove the distributor (which is easy).
http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/distrotor.html
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If you can get a good bite on the screw or bolt, try TIGHTENING it. Sometimes this will break it loose, and then you may be able to back it out. Good luck.

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If you have to take out the distributor, you might grind a straight slot in the screw head with a Dremel motor and a small grinding wheel. Then you could just use a straight tip screwdriver to unscrew it. Ron

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It'll strip. The head's not deep enough. http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/distrotor.html
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hutchtoo wrote:

A few ideas:
Drill the head off - use a drill bit slightly larger than the shank of the screw. Then remove the distributor and use a pair of needle-nose ViseGrips to get it out.
Drill a small hole as appropriate and use a standard screw extractor (see http://www.mytoolstore.com/hanson/extractr.html for typical designs).
Use one of the other type of new-fangled screw removers that chew into the stripped drive indent, such as: http://tinyurl.com/9q2to or http://tinyurl.com/38ted
The latter worked well for me on the extra-soft brass screws my '87 Accord had holding the auto-choke housing to the carburetor.
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